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Clemson Universi 



I 29.58/3:C 38/2/V.3 



National Park Service 

U.S. Department of the Interior 

Boston National Historical Park 
Charlestown Navy Yard 




3 1604 019 690 900 




Charlestown Navy Yard 
Historic Resource Study 



Volume 3 of 3 



2010 




FEDERAL 
PUBLICATION 



Front Cover: 

This aerial photograph of the Charlestown Navy Yard was taken by Airphoto 
of Wayland, Mass., on Apr. 10, 1971. At this time, the Charlestown Navy 
Yard was still a fairly busy facility, with all three dry docks being occupied 
and a variety of ships found at the yard's piers. The LSD at Pier 7 West is 
possibly USS Pensacola (LSD-38), commissioned at the yard in March 
1971. BOSTS- 13344 



Charlestown Navy Yard 
Historic Resource Study 



by 

Stephen P. Carlson 



Volume 3 of 3 



Produced by the Division of Cultural Resources 
Boston National Historical Park 
National Park Service 

U.S. Department of the Interior 
Boston, MA 

2010 



Boston National Historical Park 

Charlestown Navy Yard 
Boston, MA 021 29 

www.nps.gov/bost 



Publication Credits: Other than U.S. Navy images which are in the public domain, photographs and graphics may not be reproduced for 
re-use without the permission of the owners or repositories noted in the captions. 



Library Cataloging-in-Publication Data 

Carlson, Stephen P., 1948- 

Charlestown Navy Yard historic resource study / by Stephen P. 
Carlson. 

v. cm. 
"Produced by the Division of Cultural Resources, Boston National 
Historical Park, National Park Service." 
Includes bibliographical references and index. 

1 . Boston Naval Shipyard (Boston, Mass.)— History. 2. Charlestown 
Navy Yard (Mass.)— History. 3. Boston National Historical Park (Bos- 
ton, Mass.). 4. Historic buildings — Massachusetts — Boston. S.Bos- 
ton (Mass.) — Buildings, structures, etc. 

I. Boston National Historical Park (Boston, Mass.). Division of Cultural 
Resources. II. Title. 
[VA70.B68C37x2010] 



Contents 



Volume 1 of 3 

Statement Of Significance, Charlestown Navy Yard iii 

Contents v 

Figures & Tables vi 

Galleries & Sidebars vii 

Illustrations & Style k 

Acknowledgments xi 

Chapter 1 - Management Summary 1 

Chapter 2 - Historical Overview 9 

Chapter 3 - South Boston Annex 279 

Chapter 4 - Overview And Assessment 359 

Volume 2 of 3 

Chapter 5 - Resource Inventory 395 

Volume 3 of 3 

AppendixA- Chronology 1077 

Appendix B - Ships Built By The Navy Yard 1159 

Appendix C- Navy Yard Collections 1175 

Appendix D - Glossary 1193 

Appendix E - Bibliography 1227 

Appendix F - Existing Conditions Drawings 1239 

Index 1245 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/charlestownnavyyOOcarl 



Appendix A 

Chronology 



THIS CHRONOLOGY presents events relating to the his- 
tory of the Charlestown Navy Yard. Events are arranged in 
increasing order of specificity (i.e., events during a year are 
listed before events for which a quarter or month is known, and 
events during a month are listed before events occurring on a spe- 
cific date in the month). 

Completion dates shown for facilities construction projects are 
generally contract completion dates; when a single contract involved 
multiple facilities, individual structures may have been completed 
and occupied at an earlier date (see dates shown in Table 5- 1 ). Build- 
ing numbers for pre- 1 870 structures are those assigned in 1 868. 

With a few exceptions where the keel-laying or commissioning 
date is significant, ship construction is listed by the date of launch- 
ing. Full details of shipbuilding are given in Appendix B. 

Contextual events are shown in blue. Events relating to the 
South Boston Annex/Boston Army Base are shown in red, while 
those relating to facilities in East Boston, Chelsea, and elsewhere 
are shown in violet. Events relating to USS Constitution and USS 
Cassin Young are shown in green and brown, respectively. 

1625 
Thomas and Jane Walford became the first British settlers 
in what is now Charlestown; a major influx of inhabitants 
occurred in 1 629 and 1 630. 

1742 

June 1 The Friendship Club, forerunner of the Boston Marine 
Society, extablished. 

1754 

Feb. 2 Boston Marine Society chartered. 







"View of the Attack on Bunker's Hill, with the Burning of Charles Town, 
June 17,1 775." This engraving by Lodge after a drawing by Millar was 
prepared for Edward Barnard's New, Comprehensive and Complete His- 
tory of England published in London in 1 783. The area in the foreground 
where British troops landed for their assault on colonial positions was later 
chosen as the site for the Navy Yard. NARA 148-GW-448 



1775 
June 17 British troops landed in Charlestown to assault Colonial 
fortifications on Breed's Hill; town of Charlestown burned 
during the battle. 

1794 

Mar. 27 Naval Armament Act of 1794 signed; legislation autho- 
rized construction of six frigates and marked the birth of 
the U.S. Navy. 

1797 
Oct. 21 USS Constitution launched at Hartt's Shipyard. Boston. 

1798 

Apr. 30 Department of the Navy established with Benjamin 
Stoddert as first Secretary of the Navy. 

1799 

Feb. 25 Act authorizing construction of six 74-gun ships-of-the- 
line signed; act used as authority for the establishment of 
navy yards. 

Oct. 2 Washington Navy Yard established. 

1800 

Apr. 25 Secretary of the Navy Stoddert recommended to Presi- 
dent John Adams that navy yards be established at Ports- 
mouth, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, and 
Norfolk. 

May 9 President Adams approved location of Boston Navy Yard 
in Charlestown. 

June 2 Secretary of the Navy Stoddert commissioned Dr. Aaron 
Putnam to purchase the land for the Navy Yard on behalf 
of the government. 

June 12 Portsmouth Navy Yard established at Kittery, Mass. 

June 15 Norfolk Navy Yard established at Gosport, Va. 

June 1 7 Massachusetts General Court approved an act authoriz- 
ing the United States to purchase land for the Charlestown 
Navy Yard. 

Aug. 26 First purchase of land for Charlestown Navy Yard (from 
Richard Boylston) completed; date is regarded as the es- 
tablishment date for the yard; additional purchases would 
continue through Apr. 1 80 1 . 

Nov. 12 Secretary of the Navy Stoddert directed the Naval Agent 
in Boston to move all naval timber and other property 
from Hartt's Shipyard to the Navy Yard. 

1801 

Jan. 10 Town of Charlestown agreed to abandon public streets 

within the limits of the Navy Yard. 
Feb. 7 New York Navy Yard established at Brooklyn, N. Y 



1077 



v^Ncir lebiuwii navy Taiu nibiuii^ r^ebuui^e oiuuy 



Feb. 28 Marine Hospital severely damaged by fire. 

Sept. 7 Construction ofShiphouseG over original Building Ways 

authorized. 
Nov. Keel of USS Virginia (renamed USS Vermont in 1 827) laid 

down; construction suspended in 1825. 

1819 

June Shiphouse G completed over original Building Ways. 
Winter "Green Store" converted into temporary Receiving Ship 
for the Navy Yard. 

1820 

Masting Shears P erected at the head of the Pile Wharf. 
Aug. 22 Shed over pitch kettles destroyed by fire. 
Nov. 2 USS Alligator launched. 
Nov. 23 USS Independence designated as Receiving Ship for the 

Navy Yard. 

1821 

Picket fence erected along northern boundary of yard from 
Marine Barracks to Marine Hospital Reservation. 

Apr. 10 Board of Navy Commissioners ordered the establishment 
of volunteer fire departments at all navy yards. 

July 9 Board of Navy Commissioners approved construction of 
new Smithery O at eastern end of the yard. 

July 23 Board of Navy Commissioners approved construction of 
Commandant's Barn (Building 20). 

July 31 Board of Navy Commissioners approved construction of 
Shiphouse I (Building 71) over ways for second ship-of- 
the-line; project would be completed in July 1 822. 

Aug. 9 Army Reservation in the lower yard transferred to the 
Navy; in return, the Army obtained use of the old Black- 
smith Shop (Building 6) for storage. 

Dec. 10 New Smithery O completed. 

1822 

Jan. 15 New road between the two building ways completed. 

May 22 Keel of USS Vermont (renamed USS Virginia in 1 827) laid 
down on ways of Shiphouse I (Building 71); construction 
suspended in 1 827 and never resumed; broken up 1 874. 

1823 

Causeway connecting Smithery O and Shiphouse 1 (Build- 
ing 71) completed. 

Aug. 23 Capt. Bainbridge relieved Capt. Hull as Navy Yard Com- 
mandant. 

Sept. 22 Parcel of land at Chelsea ( 1 15 acres) purchased from Aaron 
Dexter for use as naval hospital. 

Oct. 23 Board of Navy Commissioners approved planting of elm 
trees within the yard; work commenced on Oct. 31,1 823. 

1824 

Half-Moon Battery leveled. 

Apr. 29 FY 1824 Naval Appropriations Act authorized the pur- 
chase of "a slip of land ... to straighten the back line of the 
navy yard." 

July 1 Board of Navy Commissioners approved construction of 
Navy Yard Boundary Wall between the Navy Store (Build- 
ing 5) and Salem Turnpike (Chelsea St.). 



Aug. 27 
Nov. 6 



Nov. 7 



Feb. 16 

Mar. 3 

Apr. 6 
Apr. 30 
July 25 

Aug. 2 



Oct. 15 
Nov. 29 



Dec. 



Feb. 



Apr. 



Apr. 20 

May 22 



Marquis de Lafayette visited the Navy Yard. 
Loammi Baldwin submitted report to the Navy en his sur- 
vey of the possible construction of a dry dock at the Navy 
Yard. 

Master Commandant William B. Shubrick became acting 
commandant of Navy Yard on the departure of Capt. 
Bainbridge to become President of the Board of Navy 
Commissioners. 

1825 

Board of Navy Commissioners authorized construction of 
Shiphouse H (Building 68) west of Shiphouse I (Building 
7 1 ). Ways would first be used for USS Cumberland, laid 
down on Nov. 29, 1825. 

Congress authorized establishment of a navy yard on the 
Gulf coast of Florida; a board of naval officers selected a 
site at Pensacola for this facility. 

Capt. William M. Crane assumed position of Navy Yard 
Commandant. 

Marine Hospital property at east end of Navy Yard trans- 
ferred from the Treasury Department to the Navy. 
Board of Navy Commissioners approved construction of 
Lower Quarters (Quarters L-M-N-O/Building 266) on the 
site of the Marine Hospital. 

Navy and Salem Turnpike Co. exchanged land along Sa- 
lem Turnpike (Chelsea St.) in order to straighten northern 
boundary of yard. 
USS Boston launched. 

Keel of USS Cumberland laid down in Shiphouse H (Build- 
ing 68); construction suspended and frigate not launched 
until 1842. 
Commandant's Stable (Building 2 1 ) completed. 

1826 

Belfry containing yard bell added to Shiphouse G 
Construction of Mast House & Spar Shop (Building 85) 
begun. 

Army ordnance removed from former Blacksmith Shop 
(Building 6) and transferred to Watertown Arsenal; upon 
completion of removal. Navy took possession of the struc- 
ture. 

Pensacola Navy Yard established. 
Congress directed that a study be made regarding the 
construction of dry docks at Portsmouth, Charlestown, 
Brooklyn, and Gosport. 



This painting of the 
sloop-of-war USS 
Boston was done by 
Rod Claudius in 1962 
for display on the 
guided missile cruiser 
USS Boston (CAG-1). 
NHC NH-86690-KN 




1080 



Appendix A, Chronology 



Aug. Lower Quarters (Quarters L-M-N-O/Building 266) com- 
pleted; project included demolition of Marine Hospital 
building. 

Oct. Timber Shed C (Building 1) completed; redesignated as 

Tank Shed in Jan. 1827. 

Oct. 12 Navy Yard Boundary Wall along Salem Turnpike (Chelsea 
St.) completed. 

Nov. 26 USS Warren launched. 

Dec. 26 Board of Navy Commissioners approved completion of 
launching ways at Shiphouse H (Building 68) and of cause- 
way to Smithery O. 

1827 

"Hoisting Crane" or Shears built on Pile Wharf. 

Jan. 10 President John Quincy Adams submitted the report by 
Secretary of the Navy Samuel L. Southard on the study of 
dry dock construction. Enclosing a detailed survey made 
by engineer Loammi Baldwin, Southard recommended that 
the priorities for construction be Boston, Norfolk, New 
York, and Portsmouth. 

Mar. 3 Congress authorized the construction of two dry docks, 
one north of the Potomac and one south of the Potomac, 
and directed the preparation of master plans for the devel- 
opment of all navy yards. 

June 1 Construction of Dry Dock 1 begun under supervision of 
Chief Engineer Loammi Baldwin; construction of the com- 
panion dock at Norfolk began in Nov. 1 827. 

June 13 Commodore Charles Morris assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

Sept. 15 President John Quincy Adams visited the Navy Yard. 

Oct. Alexander Parris replaced James Baldwin as assistant to 

Chief Engineer Loammi Baldwin to oversee the construc- 
tion of Dry Dock 1. 

Nov. 3 USS Falmouth launched. 



Yard Commandants In The 1820s & 1830s 



1828 

Construction of Saluting Battery commenced. 

Board of Navy Commissioners approved construction of 

Timber Shed No. 33 (Building 64). 

Board of Navy Commissioners transmitted master plan for 

the Navy Yard to Commandant Morris; plan had been 

prepared under the direction of Chief Engineer Baldwin. 

1830 

Board of Navy Commissioners approved construction of 
Timber Dock No. 5 1 (Structure 87); completed in Oct. 1 830. 
Richard Harris, on behalf of the heirs of John Harris, claimed 
ownership of the portions of Henley and Water Sts. within 
the Navy Yard that had been abandoned in 1801 on the 
grounds that the town held only a right-of-way easement 
over Harris's property. The dispute would continue for 
the next decade. 

1831 

Feb. 16 Timber Shed No. 38 (Building 75) completed. 

Apr. 6 Board of Navy Commissioners approved construction of 

Timber Shed No. 3 1 (Building 63). 
Apr. 26 Magazine K demolished. 



Apr. 1 
June 26 

Aug. 11 



Mav 7 



July 22 




Capt. William M.Crane 

BOSTS-7072 




j,*^*, f 



% 




Commodore Charles Morris 

BOSTS-7249 



Commodore Jesse D. Elliott 

BOSTS-7109 




Commodore John Downes 

BOSTS-7095 

Oct. Wharf No. 60 (Wharf No. 3 ) completed. 

Nov. 22 USS Boxer launched. 

1832 

Timber Shed No. 3 1 (Building 63) completed; work required 

demolition of Magazine K. 

Dry Dock Engine House No. 55 (Building 22) completed. 

July 23 Commodore Bainbridge relieved Commodore Morris as 
Navy Yard Commandant; plagued by ill health, he would 
resign on Apr. 13, 1833. 

Nov. 20 Board of Navy Commissioners designated Alexander Parris 
as superintendent for construction of Chelsea Naval Hos- 
pital "as soon as his services can be dispensed with from 
the Dry Dock." 

1833 

May 12 Commodore Jesse D. Elliott assumed position of Navy 

Yard Commandant. 
May 24 Construction of Steam Box No. 64 (Building 23) and Pitch 

House approved; completed in summer of 1 833. 
June 17 USS Delaware inaugurated Dry Dock 1 at Norfolk Navy 

Yard. 
June 24 USS Constitution inaugurated Dry Dock 1 ; among the 

distinguished guests present was Vice President Martin 

Van Buren; undocked on June 21,1 834. 



108! 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 
Chelsea Naval Hospital And Magazine 



ALTHOUGH NEVER FORMALLY COMPONENTS of the Navy 
Yard, the Naval Hospital and Naval Magazine located across 
the Mystic River in Chelsea came under the control of the Navy 
Yard Commandant until November 1 945, when the positions of Com- 
mandant of the First Naval District and that of Shipyard Commander 
were separated. 

The first Marine Hospital in Boston was built on a parcel of 
land in the Navy Yard transferred to the Treasury Department in 
1 805. The initial Marine Hospital was intended to serve both civil- 
ian mariners and naval sailors. In 1 8 1 1 , Congress authorized a sepa- 
rate Naval Hospital Fund. However, for over a decade the Navy 
made no efforts to build a separate hospital at Boston. 

That changed in 1823, when a naval hospital site in Chelsea 
was purchased from Aaron Dexter. Located at the confluence of the 
Mystic and Island End Rivers, it contained a large hill now known as 
Admiral's Hill. At the same time, the Navy Yard began efforts to 
reclaim the Marine Hospital site from the Treasury Department. That 
facility was turned over to the Navy on Apr. 22, 1 825. Two years 
later, on Oct. 4, 1 827, the Marine Hospital moved into a new facility 
in Chelsea fronting on Chelsea Creek. 

Meanwhile, Alexander Parris had been engaged to prepare plans 
for the Naval Hospital. On July 10, 1832, Congress approved the 
funds for construction. The Board of Navy Commissioners en- 
gaged Parris to superintend the work, which commenced in the sum- 
mer of 1833. The site chosen was not quite halfway between the 
shore and the top of the south face of the hill. Built of Vermont 
granite, the three-story structure (Building 1) opened on Jan. 6, 
1 837. A three-story addition at the west end was completed in 1 865. 

In 1855 the Marine Hospital acquired a portion of the Naval 
Hospital property for a new facility. This was completed in Decem- 





This view of the west and south sides of the Naval Hospital taken on Oct. 
4, 1913, shows how the facility was sited part way up the hill from the 
Mystic River. The smaller portion of the structure is the 1 865 addition. 

BOSTS-7984 

ber 1 857. Enlarged from three to four stories in 1 865, it remained in 
use until the Marine Hospital moved to Brighton in 1 940. The facili- 
ties were then turned over to the Navy, the main hospital building 
becoming quarters for hospital corpsmen (Building 59). 

By the early 1 900s, the Naval Hospital had become too small. A 
new facility (Building 22), located at the top of the hill, opened on 
April 24, 1915. The original hospital building was subsequently 
converted into quarters for Navy nurses. Throughout its existence, 
numerous other structures, including temporary hospital wards, 
quarters for officers, barracks, and support buildings, were erected 
on the property. 

On August 14, 1973, the hospital property was placed on the 
National Register of Historic Places as the Naval Hospital Boston 
Historic District. This designation reflected 
the fact that the official name of the prop- 
erty was always Naval Hospital, Boston. 
The Chelsea Naval Hospital fell victim to 
the same closure axe as the Na\ y Yard, clos- 
ing its doors in 1974. 

In December 1 979 the federal govern- 
ment sold 70 upland acres to the state. This 
area was subsequently redeveloped as the 
Admiral's Hill residential complex. While 
the 1915 hospital building was demolished. 



This Dec. 31. 1918, plan shows the Chelsea 
Naval Hospital site as it was at the end of World 
War I. The original hospital building (Building 1 ) 
is located on the mid-point of the south slope, 
while the 1915 hospital (Building 22), with its 
subsidiary structures, is at the top of the hill. 
The Naval Magazine (Building 2) is on the west 
side of the property, with its own pier (Pier 2). 
Note how the Marine Hospital site had been 
carved out of the original Naval Hospital prop- 
erty. The inset location plan shows the geo- 
graphical relationship between the hospital and 
the Navy Yard. It was this relationship that had 
led to the 1 869 proposal to move the Ropewalk 
from Charlestown to Chelsea. BOSTS-8073 



Ihr I SN»mlW.w.l 

rnriSK.vMA** 

M*P Or T-f n|BCN*A*IOtl 

IMTWirVBMENTS TO PBC aL«M». 



I082 



Appendix A, Chronology 



Chelsea Naval Hospital And Magazine 





This aerial photograph taken by a plane from Naval Air Station Anacostia on August 1 8, 1 925, has almost the same orientation as the 1 91 8 site plan. The 
key structures include the original Naval Hospital (Building 1 ); the Naval Magazine (Building 2); the new Naval Hospital (Building 22); and the Marine 
Hospital (later Building 59). BOSTS-7980 

the original structure (Building 1 ) and the former Marine Hospital 
(Building 59) have been reused along with many of the site's quar- 
ters. The remaining 35-acre portion of the property along the 
riverfront was transferred to the Metropolitan District Commission 
in October 1 970 for use as a public park, Mary O'Malley Park (Chelsea 
Naval Hospital Park). 



THE MAGAZINE at the Navy Yard was originally shared by the 
Army and the Navy. It subsequently became the sole property of 
the Navy. It was among the structures identified for removal in 
L.oammi Baldwin's 1 828 master plan for the yard. Although cannon- 
balls and some explosive shells would continue to be stored at the 
Navy Yard throughout the 1 9th century, the Navy looked to move 
its gunpowder storage to a more remote site. 

The Magazine was demolished in 1 83 1 . Not until June 30, 1 834, 
however, did Congress fund a new Naval Magazine to be located on 
the Naval Hospital property. Sited on the northwestern side of the 
hill, the granite Magazine (Building 2) and adjoining Quarters (Build- 
ing 3) were designed by Alexander Parris. The facility, formally 
transferred to the control of the Bureau of Ordnance in 1 867, would 
remain in use until 1912, when the transfer of materials to the new 
Naval Ammunition Depot at Hingham was completed. Both struc- 
tures continued to be used by the hospital and are among those at 
the site to be restored for reuse following the hospital's closure. 



The Naval Magazine, designed by 
Alexander Parris in a style similar 
to the Navy Yard Ropewalk Com- 
plex, consisted of two struc- 
tures — the Magazine (Building 2) 
(above) and the adjoining Quar- 
ters (Building 3) (right) — seen on 
Aug. 9, 1 921 . These photos were 
part of a detailed photographic in- 
ventory of the Navy's shore facili- 
ties. BOSTS-7987 (above); 
BOSTS-7976 (right) 




The original Alexander Parris-designed Naval Hospital (Building 1 ) has been converted into 
condominiums as a part of the Admiral's Hill development on the former Naval Hospital property. 
Note the difference in the color of the granite between the original building and the 1 865 addition 
at left in this Mar. 2003 view. Ron Gilbert, rbgilbert.com 




1 083 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Sept. Upper Quarters (Quarters B-C-D-E-F/Building 265) com- 
pleted. 

Sept. 9 Dry Dock 1 formally turned over to the Navy Yard. 

Nov. Quay wall and fence between Cordage Store F and 
Shiphouse G completed. 

1834 

Cobb Wharf demolished; new swinging gates for Timber 
Dock installed. 

Jan. 24 FY 1834 Naval Appropriations Act authorized extension 
of the quay wall, construction of the Ropewalk (Building 
58), laying stone runners for guns, and extending and 
repairing the timber docks. 

Apr. 1 Board of Navy Commissioners approved construction of 
Ropewalk (Building 58); modification of building configu- 
ration from that shown on the 1 828 master plan had been 
approved by President Andrew Jackson on Mar. 24, 1 834. 

May 13 Alexander Parris designated as Superintendent for Rope- 
walk construction project. 

June 30 Congress authorized the defense of the suit by the heirs 
of John Harris claiming ownership of the former Water 
and Henley Sts. within the Navy Yard. 
The same act also authorized the construction of a new 
Naval Magazine. This structure, designed by Alexander 
Parris, would be located on the grounds of the Chelsea 
Naval Hospital. 

July 28 Anchor Hoy & Tank launched. 

Autumn Additional stone runners laid in Gun Park to increase stor- 
age capacity. 

Oct. 31 Modification of 1 828 master plan to resite Tarring House 
(Building 60) and Hemp House (Building 62) from the lo- 
cation shown on the 1 828 master plan to that allocated to 
Timber Shed No. 30 approved. 

1835 

Feb. 13 FY 1835 Naval Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of Storehouse No. 15 (Building 34), extension of the 
quay wall east of the Mast House, and reorienting the 
Lower Quarters (Quarters L-M-N-O/Building 266) to face 
the Salem Turnpike (Chelsea St.). 

June 25 Board of Navy Commissioners approved extension of 
Quay Wall along the Mystic River edge of the yard from 
the Mast House to the Timber Dock; completed in Sept. 
1837. 

July 25 Board of Navy Commissioners approved reconstruction 
of Lower Quarters (Quarters L-M-N-O/Building 266); com- 
pleted in mid- 1836. 

Mar. 16 Commodore John Downes assumed position of Navy Yard 
Commandant. 

July 28 USS Independence entered Dry Dock 1 for conversion 
from ship-of-the-line to frigate; undocked on Aug. 1 9, 1 836. 

1836 

The U.S. Supreme Court in Harris et al. v. Elliott upheld 
the claim of the heirs of John Hams to the ownership of 
the portions of the former Henley and Water Sts. within 
the Navy Yard. 
Jan. 7 Chelsea Naval Hospital completed. 



May 14 FY 1 836 Naval Appropriations Act provided funds for com- 
pleting and equipping the Ropewalk. the Tarring House 
(Building 60), the Hemp House (Building 62), Storehouse 
No. 15 (Building 34). and changes to the Lower Officers 
Quarters (Quarters L-M-N-O/Building 266). 
The same act authorized purchase of a site near the Navy 
Yard for a new Marine Barracks. This authority would not 
be exercised. 

May 31 USS Porpoise launched. 

Sept. Iron fence replaced Navy Yard Boundary Wall in front of 
Lower Quarters (Quarters L-M-N-O/Building 266). 

Oct. 25 USS Consort launched. 

Oct. 29 USS Pioneer launched. 

1837 

Storehouse No. 1 5 (Building 34) and Saw Mill wing of Dry 
Dock Engine House No. 55 (Building 22) completed. 

Apr. 27 Board of Navy Commissioners authorized Alexander Parris 
to prepare plans of Navy Yard buildings and machinery. 

May Ropewalk (Building 58) completed. 

Sept. Tarring House (Building 60) completed. 

Dec. Hemp House (Building 62) completed. 

Dec. 2 USS Cyane launched. 

Dec. 16 Ropewalk began operation. 

1838 

Apr. Bridge across the Timber Dock repaired. 

May 31 FY 1 838 Naval Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of Shiphouse No. 39 (Building 73). 

June 20 Board of Navy Commissioners approved construction of 
Shiphouse No. 39 (Building 73). 

1839 

Mar. 3 Congress authorized the purchase of "a tract of land be- 
longing to the heirs of John Harris" within the Navy Yard. 
Apr. 24 USS Marion launched. 
Oct. 27 New Masting Shears erected on Shear Wharf. 

1840 

Mar. 31 President Martin Van Buren issued an order establishing 
a ten-hour day for navy yard workers. 

Apr. 28 Alexander Parris completed set of plans of Navy Yard build- 
ings; transmittal of plans marked end of Parris' employ- 
ment by the Navy Yard. 




This drawing of USS Cyane is from a journal of a cruise while the sloop-of- 
war was assigned to the Pacific Station in 1842-1843. BOSTS-10847 



1084 



Appendix A, Chronology 



Yard Commandants In The 1840s 








*KU 


Capt. John B. Nicolson 

BOSTS-7258 








Commodore Foxhall A. Parker 

BOSTS-7270 



The Navy purchased the portions of Water and Henley 
Sts. within the Navy Yard ( 1 .056 acres) in order to settle 
claims by the heirs of John Harris. 

1841 

Training brig Apprentice launched. 
Oil (Painters Boiling) House addition to Steam Chest (Build- 
ing 23) completed. 

FY 1841 Naval Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of Oil Boiling House (Building 23). 

1842 

Keel of USS Bainbhdge laid down in newly-completed 

Shiphouse No. 39 (Building 73). 

USS Bainbhdge launched. 

USS Cumberland launched. 

Capt. John B. Nicolson assumed position of Navy Yard 

Commandant. 

July 15 USS Ohio placed in service as Navy Yard Receiving Ship. 

Aug. 26 New Saluting Battery utilized for first time. 

Aug. 31 Board of Navy Commissioners abolished and replaced by 
a series of bureaus having cognizance over particular sub- 
jects. This organization was soon mirrored in individual 
navy yards, with each yard department reporting to its 
parent in Washington. 

1843 

June 19 President John Tyler visited the Navy Yard. 

July 24 Construction of an extension of the Navy Yard Boundary 

wall along the east edge of the yard commenced. 
Nov. 11 USS Plymouth launched. 

1844 

Boiler House (Building 22 Substation) addition to Dry Dock 

Engine House (Building 22) completed. 
June 15 Memphis Navy Yard authorized. 
Oct. 22 Construction of a Coal Shed on Site No. 1 5 authorized. 

1845 

Wharf No. 65 ( Wharf 5/Pier 8) and extension of Navy Yard 
Boundary Wall from Water St. along Quay Wall No. 58 




The ship-of-the-line USS Vermont was launched by the Navy Yard in 
September 1 848, nearly thirty years after she had been laid down. At the 
time of this engraving of her in Dry Dock 1 in 1 852, she was being consid- 
ered for assignment to the expedition to Japan being planned under Com- 
modore Matthew C. Perry, but the vessel would remain incomplete at 
Charlestown for another decade before being commissioned as a storehip 
to support the Civil War naval blockade of the South. BOSTS-14544 

(Wharf 1 ) at the west side of the yard completed. 
Nov. 28 Commodore Foxhall A. Parker assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

1846 

May 13 Congress declared war on Mexico, which had declared 
war on the United States on Apr. 23, 1 846. 

Aug. 20 USS Franklin placed in service as Navy Yard Receiving 
Ship, replacing USS Ohio, placed out of service on Aug. 
15,1846. 

1847 

Wharf No. 66 (Wharf 6/Pier 9) completed. 

Mar. 3 FY 1 848 Naval Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of Wharf No. 64 (Wharf 4/Pier 7), Brick Bam (Building 
56), Smith Shop & Plumbers Shop (Building 25), Shell 
House, and Joiners & Carpenters Shop (Building 24). 

Apr. 12 Reconstruction of Shear Wharf 61 begun. 

June 20 President James K. Polk visited the Navy Yard. 

1848 

Feb. 2 Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo ending Mexican War signed. 

Aug. 3 FY 1849 Naval Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of Timber Shed No. 37 (Building 76), Angle Wharf No. 
59 (Wharf 3), and Coal House No. 68 (Building 28). 

Aug. 14 Demolition of Shiphouse G approved by Secretary of the 
Navy George Bancroft; work began on Aug. 1 7 and was 
completed on Aug. 28, 1 848. 

Sept. 15 USS Vermont launched. 

Dec. 9 Master Commandant Joseph Tattnall became Acting Com- 
mandant on the departure of Capt. Parker for special ser- 
vice in Europe. 

1849 

Carpenters & Joiners Shop (Building 24) completed. 

Mar. 3 FY 1850 Naval Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of Sail Loft No. 24 (Building 33). 

Mar. 1 9 Commodore Downes resumed position of Navy Yard Com- 
mandant. 

Sept. Coal House No. 68 (Building 28) completed. 



- 1085 - 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 




Capt. Francis H. Gregory (1780- 
1866) saw active service in the 
War of 1812, becoming a British 
prisoner-of-war in 1814. Promoted 
to captain in 1838. Gregory saw 
active service during the Mexican 
War. After the war, he commanded 
the African Squadron before be- 
coming Commandant of the Navy 
Yard in May 1852. During his ten- 
ure, the yard began construction 
of the massive Machine Shop com- 
plex which would allow it to deal 
with steam-powered vessels. 
Retiring in 1 856, he was recalled 
to active duty as a rear admiral in 
1862, supervising naval construc- 
tion in private shipyards during the 
Civil War. BOSTS-7146 

Nov. Anglo Wharf No. 59 (Wharf 3) completed. 

1850 

Sept. 28 FY 1851 Naval Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of Store House No. 36 (Building 77). 

Oct. 26 USS John Hancock launched; ship is first Navy Yard- 
built vessel to be steam powered. 

1851 

Post-and-chain railing erected around Dry Dock 1 to pre- 
vent persons from falling into the dock. 

Mar. 3 FY 1 852 Naval Appropriations Act provided for comple- 
tion of Sail Loft No. 24 (Building 33) and Store House No. 
36 (Building 77), as well as for a Coal House near the 
Ropewalk ( Building 79). 

June 1 3 USS Ohio placed in service as Navy Yard Receiving Ship, 
replacing USS Franklin. 

Sept. 18 President Millard Fillmore visited the Navy Yard. 

Oct. 29 USS Princeton launched. 

1852 

Ropewalk Coal House ( Building 79) completed. 

Jan. Sail Loft No. 24 (Building 33) completed. 

May 19 Capt. Francis H. Gregory assumed position of Navy Yard 

Commandant. 
tug. 31 FY 1853 Na\ al Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of Pitch House & Oakum Loft (Building 10) and Mus- 
ter House (Building 3 I ). 





Up 

■ 



Rear Adm. Silas H. Stringham 
(1798-1876) began his naval ca- 
reer during the War of 1812. His 
active service included command 
of USS Ohio during the attack on 
Vera Cruz in the Mexican War. He 
became Commandant of the Navy 
Yard in 1855, serving until 1859. 
Promoted to rear admiral in July 
1862, he commanded the North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron until 
recalled to the command of the 
Navy Yard in Dec. 1863, the last 
officer to serve more than one term 
as Navy Yard Commandant. 

BOSTS-7335 




USS Cumberland Is seen at the Portsmouth Navy Yard ca. Sept. 1860. She 
had been converted from a frigate to a sloop-of-war in Dry Dock 1 at 
Charlestown during 1856and 1857. NHCNH-61867 

The Act also authorized establishment of a navy yard in 
San Francisco Bay or neighboring waters. 
Oct. 15 USS John Hancock hauled onto ways of Shiphouse H 
(Building 68) for reconstruction. 

1853 

Feb. 24 USS John Hancock launched following rebuilding. 

Mar. 3 FY 1854 Naval Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of Cooperage & Packing House (Building 38) and 
Coal House for Ropewalk ( Building 79). as well as rebuild- 
ing of Smithery O and Saluting Battery. 

May 12 USRC Bibb launched. 

July 14 Joseph E. Billings reported for duty as the yard's first 
permanent Civil Engineer. 

Aug. Pitch House & Oakum Loft (Building 1 0) and Muster House 
(Building 3 1 ) completed. 

Nov. 28 "Mechanics gate" in the Boundary Wall at the west end 
of the Ropewalk (Gate 4) opened. 

1854 

Sept. 16 Mare Island Navy Yard established as the first navy yard 
on West Coast. 

Aug. 5 FY 1855 Naval Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of Machine Shop. Smithery. Foundry. &. Forge Shop 
(Building 42); Boiler House (Building 43); and extension 
of Shiphouse 1 1 (Building 68) and slip. The act also autho- 
rized purchase of new steam engine for Dry Dock pumps. 
The Act also authorized transfer of Memphis Navy Yard 
to City of Memphis. 

Oct. Lengthening of building ways in Shiphouse II (Building 

68) completed 

Oct. 31 Memphis Navy Yard disestablished and transferred to City 
ofMemphis. 



1086 



Appendix A, Chronology 



1855 

3 FY 1 856 Naval Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of a Shell House (Building 32) and rebuilding of Dry 
Dock Engine Boiler House (Building 22). 

15 USS Merrimack launched. 

// Lightship Brilliant (LV-4) launched for U.S. Lighthouse 
Board; ship entered service on the Bishop & Clerks sta- 
tion in Vineyard Sound on Jan. 1 0, 1 856. 

/ Capt. Silas H. Stringham assumed position of Navy Yard 
Commandant. 

1856 

Shell House (Building 32) and Machine Shop Boiler House 
(Building 43) completed. 

New engine for Dry Dock pumps placed in service. 
USS Cumberland entered Dry Dock for conversion from 
frigate to sloop-of-war; undocked on May 23, 1 857. 

Aug. 16 FY 1857 Naval Appropriations Act authorized introduc- 
tion of gas lighting into Navy Yard. 

Aug. 30 Work to introduce gas lighting into Navy Yard began. 

1857 

Machine Shop, Foundry & Smithery (Building 42) com- 
pleted; work to install machinery would continue until 
1862. 

Battery and Ordnance Quay completed. 
Packing House & Cooperage (Building 38) completed. 
Mar. 3 FY 1 858 Naval Appropriations Act authorized extension 
of Dry Dock 1 and addition of third story to Packing House 
(Building 38). 

1858 

June 12 FY 1859 Naval Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of Ropewalk Boiler House (Building 79). 
July 8 Construction began on extension of Dry Dock. 
Nov. 22 USS Hartford ( IX- 1 3 ) launched. 

1859 

Feb. 15 USS Narragansett launched. 

Apr. 30 Capt. William L. Hudson assumed position of Navy Yard 
Commandant. 





During the Civil War, the Navy Yard built five sidewheel double-end gun- 
boats intended for service on coastal waters. The first of these ships, 
USS Maratanza, is seen here. BOSTS-11916 



Capt. William L Hudson 
(1794-1862) served as 
Navy Yard Commandant 
from April 1859 to June 
1862. Under his command, 
the yard mobilized to meet 
the needs of a rapidly-ex- 
panding Navy as a result of 
the outbreak of the Civil 
War. Appointed a midship- 
man in 1816, his first com- 
mand was USS Peacock 
from 1838 to her loss in 
June 1841. He later com- 
manded USS Vincennes 
and USS Niagara. He died 
only a few months after 
being relieved as yard Com- 
mandant. The Boston-built 
destroyer USS Hudson 
(DD-475) was named in 
Capt. Hudson's honor. 

BOSTS-7169 



1860 

June Navy Yard civilian employment stood at 460. 

1861 

Confederate forces seized Pensacola Navy Yard. 
FY 1862 Naval Appropriations Act authorized repairs to 
Marine Barracks (Quarters I); this project involved rebuild- 
ing and enlarging the structure. 
Attack on Fort Sumter marked start of Civil War. 
President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed naval blockade of 
the South; blockade limits expanded on Apr. 27 in response 
to the secession of Virginia from the Union. 

Apr. 20 Confederate forces seized Norfolk Navy Yard, including 
USS Merrimack, which would be converted into ironclad 
CSS Virginia. 

May 9 Bureau of Yards & Docks authorized moving of Comman- 
dant's Office (Building 29) from the Marine Barracks Pa- 
rade Ground (north side of Second Ave.) to the Shot Park 
(south side of Second Ave.). 

Aug. 5 FY 1862 Supplemental Naval Appropriations Act autho- 
rized completion of Marine Barracks (Quarters I ) project. 

Oct. 10 USS Wachusett launched. 

Nov. 20 USS Housatonic launched. 

Nov. 26 USS Maratanza launched. 

Dec. 21 Powder Boat launched. 

1862 

Mar. 9 Encounter between ironclads USS Monitor and CSS Vir- 
ginia (ex-USS Merrimack) at Hampton Roads revolution- 
ized naval warfare. 

Mar. 28 USS Canandaigua launched. 

Apr. 2 USS Genesee launched. 

Apr. 18 USS Tioga launched. 

May 9 Confederate forces abandoned Pensacola Navy Yard. 

May 10 United States forces reoccupied Norfolk Navy Yard. 



Jan. 


12 


Feb. 


21 


Apr. 


12 


Apr. 


19 



10X7 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 




The racing yacht America, which had won the first 
America's Cup race off the Isle of Wight in 1 851 , had 
been used as a Confederate blockade runner under the 
name Camilla. Scuttled on the Florida coast to avoid 
capture, Camilla was raised by the Navy in early 1 862 
and placed in commission as USS America. She spent 
much of the Civil War serving the Naval Academy, tem- 
porarily relocated from Annapolis to Newport. R.I. Here 
she is seen off the Charlestown Navy Yard in 1863. 
Sold to former Massachusetts Governor Gen. Benjamin 
Franklin Butler in 1873, America remained in private 
ownership until 1 921 . At that time she was presented 
to the Naval Academy as a training ship (IX-41 ), serving 
as such until a March 1942 blizzard resulted in the 
collapse of the structure protecting her while she was 
out of the water for an overhaul. Her crushed remains 
were disposed of in 1 945. 

Peabody-Essex Museum 6238 



June 3 Commodore John B. Montgomery assumed position of 
Navy Yard Commandant. 

June II Navy Yard began to utilize water from the Cochituate Res- 
ervoir. 

July 14 FY 1 863 Naval Appropriations Act authorized completion 
of Marine Barracks (Quarters I) repairs; purchase of 
Nesmith forge hammer and futtock sawmill and construc- 
tion of Heavy Hammer House (Building 40) and Saw Mill 
(Building 67) to accommodate them; construction of a 
Foundry coal house (Building 43 addition) and an Ord- 
nance Store (Building 39); and the purchase of Oakman & 
Eldridge's Wharf. 

Fall Reconstruction of Marine Barracks (Quarters I) completed. 

1863 

Feb. 1 7 USS Tallapoosa launched. 

Mar. 3 FY 1 864 Naval Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of new Joiners Shop & Painters Loft (Building 36) and 
additional funds for Heavy Hammer House (Building 40), 
as well as an extension of the Shear Wharf 

Mar. 23 USS Monadnock launched. 

June I Navy Yard took possession of tract of land (2.32 acres) 
purchased on July 1 , 1 862, from Oakman and Eldridge at 
west side of yard; purchase included White's Wharf as 
well as Building 3 (built 1 840) and Building 4 (built 1 827). 

June 4 USS Pequot launched. 

July 30 USS Winooski launched. 

Aug. 28 USS Saco launched. 

Dec. 15 Rear Adm. Silas H. Stringham resumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

1864 

New Water Closets (Buildings 13, 14) and Yards & Docks 

Workshop (Building 54) completed. 

New Heavy Hammer House ( Building 40) completed. 

Jan. 2 Keel of USS Pompanoosuc laid down; never launched; 
broken up 1883. 

Mar. 14 FY 1864 Deficiency Appropriations Act authorized con- 
struction of temporary storehouse for provisions (Build- 
ing 37). 



Mar. 28 The Navy purchased the former Edgeworth Tool Co. prop- 
erty in Maiden for use as a Nitre Depot. 
Keel of USS Quinsigamond laid down; never launched; 
broken up 1884. 

FY 1865 Naval Appropriations Act provided additional 
funding for Joiners Shop (Building 36), Shear Wharf ex- 
tension, and Ordnance Store (Building 39), as well as for 
railroad tracks in the yard. 
USS Ammonoosuc launched. 
Employment peaked at 4,955. 



Apr. 15 



May 21 



July 21 
Dec. 



1865 

Mar. 3 FY 1866 Naval Appropriations Act authorized the con- 
struction of an addition to the 2nd story of the Ropewalk 
(Building 58), two building slips, and a Tar Pit (Building 
59). 

Apr. 9 Surrender of Gen. Robert E. Lee to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant 
marked effective end of Civil War. 

Apr. 20 Explosion in the Shell House (Building 32) killed four men 
and wounded six others. 

Sept. 9 USS Guerriere launched. 

Oct. 18 Construction of Coal Shed on former Oakman & Eldridge 
Wharf (Building 7) approved. 

Nov. 4 Navy Yard railroad system inaugurated. 

Nov. 30 Construction of USS Keywadin and USS Quinsigamond 
suspended; never resumed; broken up 1 884. 

1866 

Joiners Shop & Paint Loft (Building 36). Ordnance Store 
(Building 39). Copper Shop (Building 44). Repair Shop 
(Building 45), Battery Shed (Building 48), Coal Shed (Build- 
ing 78), and Hoop Furnace (Building 80) and addition of 
2nd floor to Plumbers & Tinners Shop (Building 28) com- 
pleted. 

Construction of USS Confiance, USS Meredosia, and USS 
Serapis canceled; screw sloops-of-war had been ordered 
in 1 863 but not laid down. 
Apr. 17 FY 1 867 Naval Appropriations Act authorized widening of 
main entrance to the Navy Yard as well as filling of a por- 
tion of the Timber Dock and an addition to the Stable 
(Building 56). 



1088 



MppcMUiA /-\, ^Miunuiuyy 



This June 1871 photograph of a council of war on board USS Colorado off 
Korea shows three men who either had served or would become Com- 
mandants of the Navy Yard in the post-Civil War era. Former Commandant 
(1866-1869) RearAdm. John Rodgers, then in command of the Asiatic 
Squadron, stands at the right of the table with his hand on a chart. Seated 
to his immediate right is Rodgers' Chief of Staff, Capt. Edward T. Nichols, 
who would serve as Navy Yard Commandant from 1 873 to 1 876. Standing 
second from left with his arms folded, Cdr. Lewis A. Kimberly, then com- 
manding officer of USS Benicia, would serve as Commandant from 1 885 to 
1887. ' NHCNH-63678 



Apr. 25 Bureau of Yards & Docks authorized construction of 2nd 

floor to Coal House (Building 28) for use as Plumbers & 

Tinners Shop. 
June 1 6 Nitre Depot at Maiden placed under command of the Navy 

Yard Commandant. 
July 4 Joseph Billings resigned his position as Civil Engineer of 

the Navy Yard. 
Aug. 25 USS Manitou launched. 
Oct. 4 Navy purchasedtractofland(0.014acres)near Main Gate 

to the yard from Ann M.H. Hull, widow of Isaac Hull. 
Dec. 15 Commodore John Rodgers assumed position of Navy Yard 

Commandant. 

1867 

Wood Shed (Building 2), Oil Boiling House (Building 1 1 ), 
Marine Corps Officer-of-the-Day Quarters (Building 30), 
Boiler Storage Shed (Building 41 ), Spare Machinery Shed 
(Building 46), Gun-Carriage Shed (Building 57), Grindstone 
House (Building 65), Steam Box (Building 86), and Sheds 
(Buildings 88, 89) completed. 

June 25 President Andrew Johnson visited the Navy Yard. 

July 1 A reorganization of navy yard administration saw the cre- 
ation of departments within each yard paralleling and re- 
sponsible to the various bureaus in Washington, with 
buildings in the yards assigned to the appropriate depart- 
ments. 

Aug. 15 USS Nantasket launched. 

Nov. 18 Charlestown City Council granted Navy Yard permission 
to erect a new fence and gateway at the Main Gate of the 
yard. 

1868 

During FY 1 868, the current Navy Yard building number- 
ing system was instituted. 

Iron Platers' Shop (Building 16), Saw Mill (Building 67), 
and Coal Shed (Building 72) completed. 

Apr. 11 Navy acquired site for New London Navy Yard. 

Oct. 31 USS Alaska launched. 

Dec. 12 Navy acquired League Island in Philadelphia as new site 
for Philadelphia Navy Yard. 

1869 

Woodsheds (Buildings 8 1 , 82, 83) completed. 
Mar. 11 Secretary of the Navy Adolph E. Boric established a board 
of senior officers to review and report on the condition of 
navy yards. 




Oct. 6 Naval Board on Yards and Docks submitted a report on 
the Boston Navy Yard, recommending numerous improve- 
ments, including moving of Ropewalk to Chelsea Naval 
Hospital property. 

Nov. 2 Steam heating introduced into various yard buildings. 

Dec. 15 Commodore Charles Steedman assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

1870 

Aug. 24 Bureau of Yards & Docks authorized Boiler House Chim- 
ney addition to Building 22. 

1871 

Apr. 14 Addition of third story to Muster House (Building 31) 
authorized; completed in the summer of 1 87 1 . 

Sept. 18 Site of new Timber-Bending Mill (Building 66) approved; 
completed in the spring of 1 872. 

Oct. Contract awarded to John W. Griffiths for purchase and 

installation in the Navy Yard of a timber-bending machine. 

1872 

Angle-Bending Furnace (Building 61) and Shiphouse 
(Building 92) on former Shiphouse G site completed. 

July 22 Additions to Quarters C and D authorized; work was com- 
pleted during FY 1 873. 

Sept. 15 Commodore Enoch G. Parrott assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

1873 

Furnace (Building 9), Scale House (Building 1 9), and Equip- 
ment Department (Ropewalk) Boiler House (Building 52) 
completed. 

Aug. 20 Yard workers commenced breaking up the incomplete USS 
Virginia. 

Oct. 18 Commodore Edward T.Nichols assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

1874 

During FY 1 874 additions to Quarters B, E, and F were 
completed. Also during the year gas lighting was installed 
in Buildings 1 6, 22, 24, 33, 36, 38, 39, 42, 44, 58, 79, and 92. 

Jan. 1 City of Boston annexed City of Charlestown. 

Mar. 5 USS Intrepid launched. 

Oct. 23 USS Vandalia launched. 

Oct. 24 USS Adams launched by Donald McKay; McKay's con- 
tract for the ship had authorized him to use Navy Yard 
facilities in the construction of the screw sloop-of-war. 



- 1089 - 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 

Late 19th Century Navy Yard Commandants: A Gallery 
FROM Till; CIVIL WAR through the end ofthc 1 9th century, most in that position in this period not shown elsewhere in this appendix 



Navy Yard Commandants (excluding William F. Spicerand Henry F. 
Picking, who died in office) held the post for terms of approximately 
three years. This gallery presents portraits of all officers who served 



in order of service. Parker. Badger, and Selfridge — along with John 
Rodgers and Lewis A. Kimberly — have been honored by the Navy 
by having destroyers named for them. 




rm 




& 




V* I 






C> 


lut ~<ri 



Commodore John B. Montgomery RearAdm. Charles Steedman Commodore Enoch G. Parrott Commodore Foxhall A. Parker, Jr. 

BOSTS-7245 BOSTS-769 BOSTS-7273 BOSTS-7271 




Commodore William F. Spicer Commodore George M. Ransom Commodore Oscar C. Badger Commodore William P. McCann 

BOSTS-77329 BOSTS-7291 BOSTS-7012 BOSTS-7213 





t*TE 



Capt. Thomas O. Selfridge 

BOSTS-7311 



RearAdm. Joseph Fyffe 

BOSTS-7126 



\ 





Commodore Joseph N. Miller 

BOSTS-7242 



RearAdm. Henry F Picking 

BOSTS-7279 



1875 
Blacksmith Shop (Building 25) demolished and rebuilt in 
new location as Cart Shed and Blacksmith Shop. 
Oct. 28 I TSS Wabash replaced USS Ohio as Navy Yard Receiving 
Ship; Ohio would remain moored at the yard until sold for 
scrapping in 1883. 

1876 
Jan. 7 Original Philadelphia Navy Yard at Southwark closed and 
new yard at League Island established. 

This drawing of USS Vandalia. the last wooden warship built by the Navy 
Yard, was done by former Commandant RearAdm. Lewis A. Kimberly 
while in command of the Asiatic Station. It shows the vessel in Apia Harbor, 
Samoa, just before the March 1 889 hurricane that sank the ship. 

NHCNH-42117 




1 090 



Appendix A, Chronology 




Products of the Charlestown Navy Yard were prominently displayed as a part of the U.S. Navy's exhibit at the 1876 International Centennial Exposition 
held in Philadelphia. The view at left shows spools of rope ranging from 1 to 6 inches in diameter marked "U.S. Ropewalk, Navy Yard, Boston." In front 
of the spools is a length of 8-inch diameter cable that was later displayed in the Ropewalk and is currently preserved and displayed as a part of the 
museum collection of Boston National Historical Park. The view at right shows models of dry docks, timber bent by the Navy Yard's Bending Mill (Building 
66), and a monument made from wood of ships lost in the Hampton Roads area during the Civil War, including, second and third from the top, the Boston- 
built USS Cumberland and USS Merrimack. Products of the Ropewalk would also be displayed at the 1 892 Columbian Exposition in Chicago. 

NHC NH-80854 (left); NH-80855 (right) 



May 10 The U.S. Centennial Exposition opened in Philadelphia. 

Rope and other products from the Charlestown Navy Yard 

were among the more prominent features of the U.S. Navy's 

exhibit at the world's fair. 
Oct. 2 Commodore Foxhall A. Parker, Jr., assumed position of 

Navy Yard Commandant. 



1878 



May 



American Wood Preservation Co. opened wood treatment 

plant in Building 41. 
June 26 Commodore William F. Spicer assumed position of Navy 

Yard Commandant. 
June 30 Extension to Quarters E completed by PL. Ritner. 
Nov. 29 Commandant Spicer became the first commandant since 

Samuel Nicholson to die in office; Captain of the Yard 

Capt. Milton Haxtun became Acting Commandant. 

1879 

During FY 1 879, Buildings 35,51,55, and 72 were demol- 
ished along with the major portion of Building 1 . 
Extensions to Quarters A, B, and F, as well as an addition 
to the south end of the Commandant's Barn (Building 20), 
completed. 

New entrance to the Navy Yard from Chelsea St. at the 
Tank Shed (Building 1 ) opened. 
Feb. 15 Commodore George M. Ransom assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

1880 

Coal Shed (Building 7), which replaced an earlier struc- 
ture, and Watch House (Building 84) completed. 



During FY I 
demolished. 



1881 

; 1 , Buildings 2, 8, 1 1 , 1 3. 50, and 53 were 



1882 

During FY 1 882, Buildings 9 and 1 4 were demolished. 

Feb. 15 Commodore Oscar C. Badger assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

Aug. 5 FY 1 883 Naval Appropriations Act provided for the con- 
struction of two steel cruisers. This act, along with the FY 
1 884 Naval Appropriations Act of Mar. 3, 1 883, marked the 
birth of the "New" Navy of steel. 

1883 

June 6 Commission on Navy Yards issued preliminary report rec- 
ommending that Boston Navy Yard not be used for ship 
construction and repair in peacetime but that it should 
continue as a manufacturing yard for rope and canvas 
products. 

June 23 Secretary of the Navy William E. Chandler ordered all work 
except rope manufacture and in the sail loft suspended. 

1885 

Apr. 10 Commodore Lewis A. Kimberly assumed position of Navy 

Yard Commandant. 
May American Wood Preservation Co. ceased operations in 

Building 41 
July 1 Employment reached post-Civil War low of 1 1 9. 

1886 

During FY 1 886, Building 86 was demolished. 
Dec. 18 Secretary of the Navy William C. Whitney ordered the 
Navy Yard closed as shipyard and redesignated as a manu- 
facturing yard effective Feb. 1, 1887. 

1887 

Mar. 3 FY 1 888 Naval Appropriations Act provided funds for re- 
building wharves and repairs to Dry Dock 1 floating gate. 
June Naval Prison in Building 38 completed. 



1091 - 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



June 1 Commodore William P. McCann assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

1888 

Building 54 demolished. 
Sept. 7 FY 1889 Naval Appropriations Act provided funds for lay- 
ing new water pipes. 

1889 

During FY 1889 a new Flagstaff was erected in place of 

one which had rotted away. 

Buildings 37, 57, 6 1 , 65, 74, 8 1 , 83, and 86 demolished. 
Mar. 2 FY 1 890 Naval Appropriations Act funded rebuilding Lower 

Officers Quarters (L-M-N-O) and alteration and repair of 

the Marine Barracks (Quarters H-I-K). 
Sept. 18 Contract awarded for reconstruction of Lower Officers 

Quarters (Quarters L-M-N-O). 

1890 

May 31 Captain Thomas O. Selfridge assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

June 30 FY 1 89 1 Naval Appropriations Act provided funds for in- 
stalling an electric welding machine upon guarantee that 
"it will operate satisfactorily in the welding of steel links 
for chain cables of the various sizes up to two and one 
half inches in diameter"; act also funded a new boiler and 
pumping machinery and resetting the end of Dry Dock 1 
as well as additional tools "required to further improve the 
condition of the yard for building and repairing iron and 
steel ships . . . [and] repairing modern marine machinery," 
including improvements to the boiler-making plant. This 
act effectively reversed the 1 886 closure order. 

1891 

Mar. 2 FY 1 892 Naval Appropriations Act provided funds for 
constructing steel shears as well as extensions and re- 
newals of the water pipe system and wharf repairs. 

July I Conversion of Shell House (Building 32) into Comman- 
dant's Office authorized to replace existing offices in Build- 
ing 29, which had been condemned on June 27, 1 89 1 . 

Sept. 16 Puget Sound Naval Station established; redesignated 
Puget Sound Navy Yard on July 23, 1 90 1 . 

Oet. Installation of new engine and pumps for Dry Dock 1 in 

Building 22 completed. 

Dec. Conversion of Timber-Bending Mill (Building 66) into Iron 
Platers Shop completed. 

1892 

Floating Derrick No. 2 (YD-2) launched. 
Oct. New Steel Shears delivered by S.C. Forsaith Machine Co. 

1893 

Mar. 3 FY 1 894 Naval Appropriations Act provided funds for 
wharf repairs. 

July 13 Rear Admiral Joseph Fyffe assumed position of Navy Yard 
Commandant. 

Vbv. 14 Secretary of the Navy granted revocable permit to the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners for the construc- 
tion of a sewer main through the Navy Yard. 





■ 


( Viixtz: *_l ..v ' • : v % 2*d 


j£-"jfffr w 4JPTlC3P 


1 '*-/- ." 


rflflftf*' 



The 1890s were a period of considerable experimentation as the Navy 
sought to determine the nature of its battle fleet. One of the more unusual 
vessels built in this period was the steel armored harbor defense ram USS 
Katahdin, constructed by Bath Iron Works. From Jan. 25 to Mar. 19, 1895, 
and again from Sept. 21 to Oct. 24, 1895, she was in Dry Dock 1 as Bath 
personnel worked to complete the vessel so that she would meet contract 
requirements for formal delivery to the Navy. Boston Athenaeum 

1894 

July 26 FY 1 895 Naval Appropriations Act provided funds for an 
electric light plant and the introduction of steam heat into 
the Marine Barracks and Officers' Quarters (Buildings H- 
I-K). 

This Act also authorized repair of USS Constitution for 
use as a naval militia training ship. 

Aug. 3 Commodore Joseph N. Miller assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

Sept. 20 Contract awarded to General Electric Co. for establish- 
ment of Electric Light Plant in Building 28. 

1895 
Feb. New steel shears on Wharf 2 completed. 
Mar. 2 FY 1 896 Naval Appropriations Act provided additional 

funds for the electric light plant, including service to the 

Receiving Ship Wabash. 
Mar. 12 First electric lights in the Navy Yard placed in use. 

1896 

Mar. 1 7 Building 4 1 collapsed due to snow load on roof. 

June 10 FY 1 897 Naval Appropriations Act provided funds for al- 
teration of Building 56 as a Cart Shed, and for boilers for 
the electric light plant. 

1897 

East end of Building 56 converted into Cart Shed for stor- 
age of yard vehicles. 

Telephones introduced into Navy Yard, with switchboard 
installed in Building 31. 
Jan. Demolition of Cart Shed (Building 25) completed. 



kw: 



Appendix A, Chronology 



The Navy Yard In Winter: A Gallery 

WINTER WEATHER always posed a problem for navy yards lo- winter of 1898-1899. The views show the yard just prior to the start 
cated in the northeast. This gallery presents a series of views of the of the major modernization campaign which would transform it from 
yard following a heavy snowfall in the late 1890s, probably the a nearly-obsolete facility into a modern shipyard. 




This view looks west across the Dry Dock. From left to right are the Boat House (Building 94); the Foundry (Building 1 6); the Store House (Building 5), 
then housing a variety of activities including the pay office, dispensary, labor board, museum, and paint shop; and Quarters B-F Rising above the roof 
of the Foundry are the Hoosac Docks Grain Elevator and Hoosac Stores No. 1 &2. BOSTS-14957 




This view shows Quarters B through F. At this time, they were occupied 
by the Equipment Officer, Naval Constructor, Chaplain, Steam Engineering 
Officer, and General Storekeeper, respectively. BOSTS-14957 



Note the vine-covered pergola covering the walk leading up to the Com- 
mandant's House (Quarters G) as well as the wooden fence and guard 
house. A gas lamp is at right, while a relatively new electric light hangs 
from an arm on the utility pole. Within a decade, overhead wires would be 
placed underground. BOSTS-14957 



1093 




Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 
The Navv Yard In Winter: A Gallery 



This view shows the Marine Barracks (Quarters H-l-K) looking across a 
depleted Shot Park. Note the USS Niagara figurehead in the center and the 
Marine Corps Officer of the Day Office (Building 30) at right. 

BOSTS-14957 





These views look east across the Gun Park. Above, buildings visible in the 
background are, from left to right, the Muster House (Building 31), the 
Commandant's Office (Building 32), the Joiners Shop (Building 36), and the 
Machine Shop (Building 42) with its landmark chimney (Building 43). In the 
image at left, the Niagara figurehead is at left while the Muster House 
(Building 31 ) is in the center background. 
BOSTS-14957 (above); Burroughs Collection. Bostonian Society (left) 








* ^ -^ »*■ 




Building 23 (left), then a Plumbers Shop, was the former Chapel while 
Building 24 was the Carpenters Shop & Rigging Loft. BOSTS-14957 


■^...^yj.,, 


V 





A worker shovels the wooden sidewalk of 5th St. in this image, Building 24 
is at left, while Building 28, the Electric Light Station, is on the east side of 
the street. BOSTS-14957 




These two views show the Wet Basin (Structure 90/91 ). At left, looking south, the Receiving Ship Wabash, long a fixture on the yard's waterfront, can 
be seen. The image at right looks east and shows the Joiners Shop (Building 36), Rolling Mill & Anchor Shop (Building 40), and the Machine Shop Complex 
(Buildings 42/43). Beginning in the spring of 1 899 the Wet Basin would be transformed into Dry Dock 2 and a Recreation Field. BOSTS-14957 



1 0^4 - 



Appendix A, Chronology 



Mar. 3 FY 1898 Naval Appropriations Act provided funds for 
swinging gates for Dry Dock 1 and for additional culverts 
in the Dry Dock caisson. It also funded adding an addi- 
tional story to the Marine Barracks. 
The Act also transferred funds appropriated in FY 1895 
for repair of USS Constitution lor "such work as may be 
necessary for the proper care and preservation of that 
historic vessel." This action provided the funding neces- 
sary to tow the ship from Portsmouth to Boston. 

May 5 Commodore Henry L. Howison assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

Sept. 21 USS Constitution arrived at Navy Yard from Portsmouth 
Navy Yard. 

1898 

Shiphouse (Building 73) demolished. 

Addition of a 4th floor to the Marine Barracks (Quarters I) 

completed. 

New London Navy Yard redesignated as coaling station. 

Jan. Atlantic Works of East Boston awarded contract for in- 
stallation of additional culverts in the Dry Dock caisson. 

Feb. 15 USS Maine destroyed by internal explosion in Havana 
Harbor, Cuba; belief that explosion was external led to 
increased calls for war with Spain. 

Apr. 25 Congress declared war on Spain. 

May 4 FY 1 899 Naval Appropriations Act provided funds for an 
iron roof for Building 42 and modem machine shop tools. 
The act also authorized the construction of Dry Dock 2 
when it funded four timber dry docks to be built at the 
Portsmouth. Boston, Philadelphia, and Mare Island Navy 
Yards and gave the Secretary of the Navy the authority to 
build one of these docks of granite and concrete rather 
than timber. Boston was chosen to receive the granite 
dock; later acts authorized the other docks to be built of 
the more durable materials as well. 

Sept. 7 New pier and bulkhead line, establishing waterside bound- 
ary of yard, approved; action added approximately 1 8 acres 
to the area of the yard. Jurisdiction over this area was 
ceded to the United States by the Massachusetts General 
Court by act of Feb. 7, 1899. 

Dec. 10 Treaty of Paris ending Spanish-American War signed. 

1899 

Coal House (Building 7) and Navy Yard Boundary Wall on 
Pier 1 demolished. 



In Oct. 1899 one of the heroes of 
the recent war with Spain became 
Commandant of the Navy Yard. 
Rear Adm. William T. Sampson 
(1840-1902) had defeated the 
Spanish fleet at Santiago, Cuba, 
on July 3, 1 898. He was the most 
prominent naval officer to com- 
mand the yard since William 
Bainbridge and Isaac Hull in the 
1810s and 1820s. 

NHC NH-85578-KN 





Mar. 3 



Commodore Henry L. Howison 
( 1 837-1 91 4) assumed the position 
of Navy Yard Commandant in May 

1897. An 1858 graduate of the 
U.S. Naval Academy, Howison had 
served during the Civil War and in 
a number of posts ashore and 
afloat afterwards, including a term 
as Commandant of the Mare Is- 
land Navy Yard from 1 893 to 1 896. 
He headed the yard during the 
Spanish-American War, being pro- 
moted to Rear Admiral in Sept. 

1898. Following his relief as Com- 
mandant in Mar. 1899, he com- 
manded the South Atlantic Station 
until he retired in Oct. 1899. 

NHCNH-66247 



Enlarged Ropewalk Power House (Building 96) completed. 
Building 44 moved southward and converted into office 
for construction inspectors for Dry Dock 2 project. 
Major portion of Battery Shelter (Building 49) demolished. 
FY 1 900 Naval Appropriations Act provided funds for the 
Gate House (Building 97); a new railroad system, along 
with locomotives and cars; a Coal Handling Plant (Build- 
ing 109); repairing the drainage system and connecting 
into the Metropolitan Sewer; construction of new piers 
and extension of old ones; an Electric Light Building 
(Building 108); and electric elevators in four storehouses. 
The act also authorized the Navy to enter into an agree- 
ment with the Fitchburg Railroad to rebuild the slip be- 
tween Pier 1 and Hoosac Pier, the entire project, including 
work on Pier 1, was to be at the railroad's expense. 
Contract for construction of Dry Dock 2 awarded to O'Brien 
& Sheehan of New York; work commenced on Apr. 1 3. 
Rear Adm. Henry F. Picking assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

Navy and Fitchburg Railroad signed agreement covering 
enlargement of Fitchburg Slip between the Navy Yard and 
Hoosac Pier. 

Commandant Picking became the third Commandant to 
die in office. 

Rear Adm. William T. Sampson assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

Iron Platers Shop (Building 66) damaged by fire; recon- 
struction completed in 1900. 



Mar. 


14 


Mar. 


25 


Aug. 


29 


Sept 


8 


Oct. 


14 


Nov. 25 



June 7 



1900 

New Shipkeepers & Foremen's Office (Building 1 00), Tim- 
ber Drying Kiln (Building 101), Oil Tank (Building 1 02), 
and Iron & Steel Storage Shed (Building 1 12) completed. 
Fire Apparatus House (Building 6) demolished. 
Wharves 4, 5, and 6 extended and renumbered as Piers 7, 
8, and 9. 

New Pier 6 (later 7) completed by William J. Lawler. 
FY 1901 Naval Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of a new Shipfitters Shop (Building 104), Metalwork- 
ers Shop (Building 106), Chain & Anchor Storage Shed 
(Building 103), Yards & Docks Shop Building (Building 



1095 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Early 20th Century Yard Commandants 




RearAdm. Mortimer L. Johnson 
BOSTS-7181 



RearAdm. George F.F. Wilde 

BOSTS-7368 





RearAdm. Albert S. Snow 

BOSTS-7323 



RearAdm. William Swift 

BOSTS-7338 



107), and Smithery for Construction & Repair (Building 
105); rebuilding of Machine Shop No. I in Building 42; 
extension of the Equipment Shops (Building 40); new piers 
and wharves; railroad and platform scales; a wharf-pillar 
crane; and a new caisson for Dry Dock 1 (including the 
funds from FY 1 898 swinging gate project). 
July 19 Mast House & Spar Shed (Building 85) destroyed by fire. 

1901 

Paint Shop (Building 10) moved from original location to a 
new site on reconstructed Pier 1 and Saw Mill (Building 
67) moved from First Ave. to location beside Building Slip. 
Pitch House (Building 1 1 0) constructed by Fitchburg Rail- 




USS Olympia (C-6), the flagship of Adm. George Dewey at the Battle of 
Manila Bay on May 1 , 1 898, is tied up to Pier 6 East on Nov. 1 , 1 902. The 
pier, together with Pier 7 in the background, was a part of the major mod- 
ernization effort to allow the yard to service steel vessels such as Olym- 
pia. BOSTS-13844 



May 18 
July 8 
July 12 
July 26 

Aug. 12 
Aug. 14 

Oct. 3 
Oct. 21 

Oct. 31 

Nov. 1 
Nov. 19 



Apr. 3 



July 1 



Oct. 



road south of Building 24 to replace demolished Pitch 
House (Building 12). 
Building 88 demolished. 
Railroad Repair Shed (Building 111) completed. 
Contract for reconstruction of Pier 1 awarded to Norcross 
Bros. 

FY 1902 Naval Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of a new Saw Mill & Spar Shed (Building 114). Water 
Closets (Buildings 118, 1 19), and new piers and wharves; 
extensions to the Naval Prison (Building 38); paving; dredg- 
ing; a fire-protection system; central heating system; wa- 
ter and sewer system extensions; and railroad system ex- 
tensions. 

Contract for construction of Power House portion of Forge 
Shop (Building 105) awarded to P.J. McCaffery. 
Contract for reconstruction of Machine Shop No. 1 (Build- 
ing 42) awarded to Connors Bros. 
Contract for construction of Coaling Plant ( Building 1 09) 
awarded to Augustus Smith. 

Contract for construction of Chain & Anchor Storage Shed 
(Building 103) awarded to F.G. Coburn; contractor de- 
faulted on Nov. 18, 1902, delaying completion to Aug. 
1903. 

Charleston (S.C.) Naval Station established; designated 
Charleston Navy Yard on Aug. 1, 1902. 
Contract awarded to L.L. Leach & Sons for the construc- 
tion of Shipfitters Shop (Building 1 04) and Metalworkers 
Shop (Building 106). 

RearAdm. Mortimer L. Johnson assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

Contract for extension of Building 40 awarded to F.G. 
Coburn; contractor defaulted on Nov. 1 8, 1 902, delaying 
completion until July 1903. 

The Navy Yard log recorded that the new steel Caisson 
for Dry Dock 1 was launched "without a hitch and of more 
than ordinary interest." 

Contract for construction of new Main Gate (Building 97) 
awarded to George W. Harvey. 

Contract awarded to L.L. Leach & Sons for the construc- 
tion of the Public Works Shop and Power Plant (Buildings 
107 and 108). 

1902 

Scheme for systematic numbering of Navy Yard streets 
implemented. 

Painting of building numbers on all buildings completed. 
Paving of Lincoln Ave. completed. 
Contract awarded to Norcross Bros, for construction of 
new Saw Mill (Building 114). 

FY 1903 Naval Appropriations Act authorized an addi- 
tional Water Closet (Buildings 124); a Dispensary (Build- 
ing 120); extensions to the Electric Light Plant (Building 
108); the culvert between Dry Docks 1 and 2; portal crane 
tracks; an underground conduit system; 100-ton shears; 
additional paving; water and sewer system extensions; 
and purchase of a locomotive crane. 
Marine Corps Rifle Range (Building 122) completed. 



10% 



Appendix A, Chronology 



Dec. 31 Contract for construction of Smithery (Building 105) 
awarded to L.L. Leach & Sons. 

1903 

Coal Barge No. 90 (YC -90) to Coal Barge No. 105 (YC- 
105) launched. 

Mar. 3 FY 1 904 Naval Appropriations Act authorized additional 
Water Closets (Buildings 126, 127); extensions to the rail- 
road system, electric light plant, and central heating sys- 
tem; additional paving and drains; construction of a Paint 
Shop (Building 125); improvements to Buildings 42 and 
43; and an extension to Building 107. It also funded elec- 
tric cranes for the Foundry, Boiler Shop, and Smithery 
together with machinery for various shops. 

Apr. Main Gate (Building 97) completed. 

May Water Closets for Building 42 (Buildings 1 1 7, 1 1 8) com- 
pleted. 

Shipfitters Shop (Building 104) completed. 
USS Pentucket (YT-8) launched. 

Chain & Anchor Storage Building (Building 103) com- 
pleted. 

Addition to Forge Shop & Rolling Mill (Building 40) com- 
pleted. 

Construction & Repair Power House (Building 105 
Headhouse) completed. 
Water Closets (Building 1 24) completed. 
Wireless Telegraph Station (Building 129) and Utility Tun- 
nel ("Conduit") from Main Gate to 9th St. along First Ave. 
and along 7th St. from First to Third Aves. completed. 

1904 

Foreman's Office & Labor Shed (Building 1 00) moved from 

location south of Building 24 to one east of Building 24 to 

clear site for new Paint Shop (Building 125). 

Pile Driver No. 5 (YPD-5) and Floating Workshop No. 1 

(YR-1) launched. 

Metalworkers Shop (Building 106) completed. 

Contract awarded to American Hoist & Derrick Co. for 

purchase of Portal Crane 12 and construction of crane 

track around Dry Dock 2. 

Apr. 2 7 FY 1 905 Naval Appropriations Act authorized extensions 
to the electric light plant and railroad system; additional 
paving; underground conduit system; new capstans for 
Dry Dock 1 ; a Wire Rope Mill (Building 62 Extension); and 
an Anchor & Chain Shed. It also authorized purchase of 
additional locomotive cranes and installation of electric 
lights in the Marine Barracks, as well as the consolidation 
of all electrical power plants in the yard. 
The same act authorized the purchase of land and con- 
struction of a new Naval Magazine "on or near the New 
England coast, north of Cape Cod" and directed that upon 
its completion the existing magazine at Chelsea be discon- 
tinued. Land purchases for this new facility at Hingham, 
Mass., would begin in 1 906 and continue until 1913. 

May New Saw Mill (Building 1 14) completed. 

June 1 Rear Adm. George F.F. Wilde assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 



— . 



The early 1 900s saw the Navy Yard 
resume shipbuilding, using the Build- 
ing Ways on the site of Shiphouse 
No. 39 (Building 73). USS Pentucket 
(YT-8) is seen on the ways on Apr. 
1,1903. Construction of the harbor 
tug had begun on Jan. 29 and she 
would be launched on July 16, 1903. 
BOSTS-14957 




Most of the craft the yard built in this 
period were utilitarian barges 
whose launchings were not seen 
as significant enough to record in 
the yard's official logs. One of a 
series of 16 barges completed in 
1903-1904, Coal Barge No. f02(YC- 
102) is seen at one of the yard's 
piers in May 1916. BOSTS-7629 



Contract for construction of Dispensary (Building 120) 
awarded to Jones & Meehan. 

July 4 Floating Derrick No. 13 (YD- 13) delivered to the Navy 
Yard; construction had been authorized in FY 1 90 1 . 

Aug. Annual report of the yard's Civil Engineer recommended 
construction of a new Dry Dock 3 to the east of Dry Dock 
2; while this recommendation would be repeated in subse- 
quent reports, no new dry dock would be authorized. 
Contract for construction of Paint Shop (Building 125) 
awarded to Connors Bros. 

USS Cumberland (YX-%) launched; first steel and last sail- 
only ship built by the Navy Yard. 

Building 3 demolished except for portion of north wall 
retained as yard wall. 

Smithery (Building 105), Public Works Shop (Building 107), 
Central Power Plant (Building 108), and Coal Storage & 
Handling Plant (Building 1 09) completed. 
Contract awarded to Hyde Windlass for electric capstans 
for Dry Dock 1 ; project completed in July 1 905. 
Contract awarded to Smith & Robinson of New York for 
construction of culvert connecting Dry Dock 1 to new 
Pump House (Building 123); contractor declared bank- 
ruptcy on May 12, 1905, when project was 98.4 percent 
complete; project would be completed in Aug. 1 905 

Oct. 27 Replacement of Machine Shop No. 2 in Building 42 com- 
pleted. 

Nov. 21 Contract awarded to Bernard Rolf for construction of new 
Pier 5 (later Pier 6); work completed on May 19, 1905. 

Dec. Grounds of former Gun Park south of Commandant's House 
landscaped. 

1905 

During FY 1905, Second Ave. between 3rd St. and 6th St. 
was paved with wood block paving. 
Reconstruction of Pier 1 completed; project included mov- 
ing of Building 10 and construction of Coal Storage & 
Handling Plant (Building 1 09). 
Dry Dock 2 approach Piers 3 and 4 completed. 
Ash Lighter No. 13 ( YA- 1 3 ), Ash Lighter No. 14 ( YA- 1 4), 
and Garbage Lighter No. 5 (YG-5) launched. 



Aug. 


16 


Aug. 


17 


Sept. 




Sept. 




Sept. 


22 


Oct. 


10 



- 1097 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Feb. 20 Rear Adm. Albert S. Snow assumed position of Navy Yard 
Commandant. 

Mar. Boiler House addition to Building 33 demolished. 

Mar. 5 FY 1 906 Naval Appropriations Act authorized extensions 
to water, sewer, fire protection, and railroad systems; ad- 
ditional paving; portal crane tracks extension; and con- 
struction of an Oil Storehouse (Building 131). 

May Southern portion of Building 28 removed and Building 23 
moved from area between Buildings 22 and 24 to east side 
of Building 24 to permit construction of portal crane tracks 
between Dry Dock 1 and Dry Dock 2. 

May Dispensary (Building 120) completed. 

Aug. 1 Portal crane tracks around Dry Dock 2 and extending be- 
tween Building 24 and Building 28 completed 

Aug. 12 The Navy Yard Log recorded that "at 8:34 AM the U.S. 
Armored Cruiser Maryland [CA-8] . . . was taken into the 
New Dry Dock #2 (first Ship in the Dock)." 

Oct. 9 Contract for extension of portal crane tracks around Dry 
Dock 1 awarded to CM. Leach; project completed in Jan. 
1906. 

Oct. 12 Contract for construction of new Pier 2 awarded to Will- 
iam H. Ellis of Boston; work completed on Oct. 19, 1906. 

Dec. 1 Dry Dock Pump House (Building 1 23) completed. 

1906 

Shiphouses (Buildings 68, 71) demolished. 
Majority of Building 67 demolished; remainder renumbered 
as Building 130. 

Addition to Wireless Telegraph Station (Building 129) and 
new Power Station for USS V/abash (Building 134) com- 
pleted. 

During FY 1906, brick paving was installed on Third Ave. 
and on 6th St. between First and Third Aves. 

June 29 FY 1 907 Naval Appropriations Act provided funding for a 
Refuse Kiln (Building 135); extension of the Power Plant 
(Building 108) ; a new paint room in Building 77; and addi- 
tional paving, dredging, and underground conduit. 
The same act authorized restoration of USS Constitution 
"as far as may be practicable, to her original condition." 

Sept. 12 Contract for extension of Building 103 awarded to L.L. 
Leach & Sons; project, which involved erection of a steel 
lean-to on its east side, was completed in May 1907. 

1907 

Mar. 2 FY 1 908 Naval Appropriations Act authorized continued 
paving; electric plant, heating system, telephone system, 
and railroad system extensions; railroad rolling stock; con- 
version of Building 23 into Water Closets; second floor 
extension to Ropewalk (Building 58); and other improve- 
ments to Buildings 42, 107, and 108. 

Apr 30 Extension of Saluting Gun Shed (Building 49) completed. 

June 14 PaintShop (Building 125) completed. 

June 30 As of this date, the yard possessed 13.500 feet of paved 
and 6,500 feet of dirt and cinder streets: 19.000 feet of 
railroad track; and 2.800 feet of portal crane track. 

Aug. 19 Building 114 completed. 



Nov. 16 Rear Adm. William Swift assumed position of Navy Yard 
Commandant. 

1908 

Jan. 8 Contract awarded to CM. Leach for construction of addi- 
tion to and new roof on Building 23. 

Mar. 25 CoalBargeNo. 227(YC-227) launched. 

May 2 Coal Barge No. 228 (YC-228) launched. 

May 13 FY 1909 Naval Appropriations Act authorized repairs to 
Pier 1; extension of the Power Plant (Building 108): rail- 
road rolling stock; and extensions of telephone system, 
railroad system, and underground conduit system. It also 
funded machine tools for the Boiler Shop extension and 
the Coppersmith Shop and provided for "completion" of 
the Marine Barracks, which involved construction of the 
Marine Corps Administration Building (Building 136). 

May 13 Pearl Harbor Navy Yard authorized. 

May 29 Coal Barge No. 229 (YC-229) launched. 

Dec. 29 Coal Barge No. 230 (YC-230) launched. 

1909 

Ammunition Lighter No. 1 7 (YE- 17) launched. 
Marine Corps Administration Building (Building 136) com- 
pleted; project had required demolition of Building 30. 

Mar. 3 FY 1910 Naval Appropriations Act provided funding for 
extension of the sewer system: dredging; waterfront im- 
provements; and fire protection for the Ropewalk. 

June 9 Naval Magazine at Hingham established; first ammuni- 
tion would not arrive until Jan. 1911. Following the trans- 
fer of munitions, the Chelsea Magazine was discontinued 
and turned over to the Chelsea Naval Hospital. 

Dec. 31 Rear Adm. John C Fremont assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

1910 

Concessioner J. M. Crowley opened Restaurant in Build- 
ing 28. 

Ammunition Lighter No. z'J(YE-23) launched. 
FY 1911 Naval Appropriations Act provided funding for 
dredging; waterfront improvements; railroad extensions: 
miscellaneous building improvements: and paving. 
Building 24 severely damaged by fire. 
Contract awarded to CM. Leach for extension of railroad 
tracks onto Piers 3. 4. and 6 and on 9th St. and Third Ave. 
Addition to north end of Commandant's Office (Building 
32) completed by CM. Leach. 

1911 

Refuse Kiln (Building 135) completed. 
Marine Rifle Range (Building 1 22) moved to new location 
near Building Slip. 

Wireless Station transferred to Building 10. 
Mar. 4 FY 1912 Naval Appropriations Act authorized construc- 
tion of an Officer's Quarters (Quarters P): improvement of 
the Central Power Plant (Building 108): enlargement of 
Dry Dock 2: waterfront improvements; paving: electrical 
system extensions: and miscellaneous building improve- 
ments. 



Feb. 20 
June 24 



Sept. 25 
Oct. 10 

Nov. 



1098 



Appendix A, Chronology 




Commandant Rear Adm. John C. Fremont (1 851- 
1911) was the son and namesake of famed 
explorer Maj. Gen. John C. Fremont and grand- 
son of Missouri Senator Thomas Hart Benton. 
On Mar. 7, 1 911 , he died suddenly in his study in 
Quarters G. On the following day, in a pouring 
rain, Navy Chaplain Capt. Charles H. Charlton 
conducts a funeral service on Second Ave. prior 
to the movement of the body to South Station for 
its final journey to Arlington National Cemetary. 
BOSTS-7122 (left); BOSTS-7542 (right) 



Commandant Fremont died; his funeral was held in the 
yard on Mar. 8,1911. 

Capt. DeWitt Coffman assumed position of Navy Yard 
Commandant. 

Wire Rope Mill addition to Hemp House (Building 62) 
completed by J.E. Locatelli. 

Oil Storage House (Building 131) and extension of second 
floor ofRopewalk (Building 58) completed. 
Extension of Utility Tunnel ("Conduit") completed. 
Pier 4 A completed. 

Pensacola Navy Yard closed; facility would later be devel- 
oped as Naval Air Station Pensacola. 

1912 

Gasoline Storage Tank and Pump House (Building 139) 
constructed. 

Receiving Ship USS Wabash placed out of service. 
FY 1913 Naval Appropriations Act provided for the recon- 
struction of Building 24 as well as electrical and railroad 
system extensions. 

Directors of the Port of Boston approved the construc- 
tion of a large dry dock as a part of its development of the 
South Boston waterfront. 




.$*>" 



BEK*r 



ill* 



T /»i<*. 




1913 

Railroad tracks extended onto Piers 2 and 5. 

Chain Forge moved from Building 40 to Building 105. 

Mar. West end of Building 63 destroyed by fire. 

Mar. 4 FY 1914 Naval Appropriations Act provided funding to 
remodel Buildings 40 and 77; move the Boiler Shop from 
Building 42 to Building 1 06; extend the Dispensary (Build- 
ing 1 20); and provide fuel oil storage. The act also autho- 
rized construction of a new Marine Barracks and Officers 
Quarters. 

Summer Captain of the Yard's Quarters (Quarters P) completed. 

1914 

Coal Barge No. 288 (YC-288) and Coal Barge No. 289 
(YC-289) launched. 

Woodworking Shop moved to Building 1 1 4. 
Addition to Dispensary (Building 120) completed. 
Stone Crusher ( Building 1 40) completed. 

Feb. 19 Construction of Supply Ship No. 1 (AF-1) assigned to 
Navy Yard, marking start of major ship construction at the 
yard. 

Apr. Fuel Oil Tank on site of Timber Dock 87 completed by 

Riter-Conley Co., with site work performed by yard labor; 
project also included new Pump House (Building 141). 

June 30 FY 1915 Naval Appropriations Act authorized the transfer 
of the funds appropriated for a new Marine Barracks and 
Officers Quarters to construction of a new Building Slip 
(Shipways 1 ). The act also provided funding for improve- 
ment of sanitation, including washrooms, lockers, and 
water closets, and additional transportation facilities. 

June 22 Directors of the Port of Boston awarded contract for the 
construction of Commonwealth Dry Dock. 

July 28 Austria declared war on Serbia, marking the beginning of 
World War I in Europe. 

Nov. 6 Capt. William R. Rush assumed position of Navy Yard 
Commandant. 

Dec. Addition to Oil Storage House (Building 131) completed. 

1915 

During FY 191 5, Railroad Repair Shed (Building 1 1 1 ) was 
removed. 

Incoming Commandant Capt. William R. Rush (1 857-1 940) (left) poses with 
his predecessor Capt. DeWitt Coffman ( 1 854-1 932) (center) in front of the 
Commandant's Offices (Building 39) on Nov. 6, 1914. BOSTS-7532 



low 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 
Hingham Naval Ammunition Depot 



BY THE EARLY 1 900s the Naval Magazine at Chelsea was inad- 
equate for the Navy's needs. Thus, the Fiscal Year 1 904 Naval 
Appropriations Act, approved on March 3, 1903, authorized the 
appointment of a board of naval officers to "recommend a site or 
sites for one naval magazine on the New England coast, north of 
Cape Cod, suitable for the use of the Boston and Portsmouth navy- 
yards." 

The board recommended a site on the Back River in Hingham, 
south of Boston. The Fiscal Year 1905 Naval Appropriations Act, 
signed on April 27, 1904, provided the first appropriations for land 
acquisition and authorized eminent domain proceedings if neces- 
sary. The act further directed that the Navy "discontine the maga- 
zine now in the city of Chelsea not later than the time when the new 
magazine for the New England coast is ready to be occupied." 

Ultimately, the Navy would acquire 990.262 acres of land in 
Hingham and Weymouth. The new Naval Magazine was estab- 
lished on June 9, 1 909, with Lt. Cmdr. Julian L. Latimer as the Inspec- 
tor of Ordnance in Charge. Ammunition stocks began to arrive in 
January 191 1, and the facility was considered complete in 1913. It 
was renamed Naval Ammunition Depot (NAD) Hingham in 1 9 1 6. 

During World War I, the facility specialized in supplying small 
and medium-caliber ammunition to the fleet. To support its activi- 
ties, a new shell house, as well as 15 storage buildings, and numer- 
ous support buildings were constructed. The site also housed a 
naval training camp. Following the war, the site was used for the 
storage and issuance of gun ammunition since it lacked facilities for 
storage of depth charges, bombs, and other explosives. 

World War II saw a considerable expansion of the Naval Am- 
munition Depot. Because of the extensive traffic between the site 
and either the Navy Yard or ships arriving or departing Boston, the 
Navy replaced the highway drawbridge (State Route 3A) over the 
Back River with a higher, fixed bridge. Additional barracks for both 
Navy and Marine personnel were built. Near the end of the war, the 



depot began to specialize in the manufacture of variable-time fuses 
for anti-aircraft artillery and in the production of 5-inch rockets. 
Ammunition handling units here, as well as at other naval ammuni- 
tion facilities, consisted of African-American sailors. 

The Back River site was insufficient to meet demands, and in 
1941 the Navy began construction of an annex site a short distance 
away in Hingham, Cohasset, Scituate, and Norwell. This 3,747.63- 
acre installation was known as the Cohasset Naval Magazine as 
well as the Cohasset Annex. 

Following World War II, work at the depot involved munitions 
overhaul and disposal. The main Hingham site was placed in a 
maintenance status on March 31,1 950. It was finally closed in 1 96 1 , 
and disposed of by the General Services Administration (GSA) for 
various purposes. The largest single tract, 469 acres, went to the 
town of Hingham in 1971 and became Bare Cove Park; 237 acres of 
land on the Weymouth side of the Back River was acquired by that 
town in 1972 as Great Esker Park. 

In April 1956, a portion of the Cohasset Annex site was trans- 
ferred to the Army for the construction of a Nike-Ajax anti-aircraft 
missile facility (BO-38). The missile installation was deactivated in 
December 1961. In that same year, the Navy reported 3 ,200 acres as 
surplus, retaining the remaining acreage for use by a contractor, 
American Cyanamid, doing research work on solid rocket propel- 
lants. This project ended in December 1965. In March 1967, the 
Navy issued a license to the Army covering its remaining Annex 
property. That service operated it as the Cohasset Army Ammuni- 
tion Activity unil October 1968. 

The Navy's formal involvement with the Annex ended in 1 97 1 , 
when it transferred its remaining property to the Army. It became 
the Hingham/Cohasset Army Reserve Center. The facility closed in 
late 1982. 

In 1 967 the General Services Administration conveyed 2,99 1.33 
acres of the Annex site to the state for park and recreation use. The 




i^. 



, 



**! 



Safety was always an im- 
portant consideration in the 
storage and handling of 
explosives. Note in this Oct. 
1 939 aerial photograph how 
the individual storage maga- 
zines and other buildings of 
the Hingham Naval Ammu- 
nition Depot were spread 
throughout the 990-acre 
site. An internal railroad 
system facilitated move- 
ment of munitions to and 
from the site's pier. Note 
that the land on the 
Weymouth side of the Back 
River (upper left) was left 
undeveloped as a safety 
buffer zone. Numbers indi- 
cate the location of struc- 
tures shown elsewhere in 
this sidebar. BOSTS-8078 



1 00 



Appendix a, onronoiogy 



Hingham Naval Ammunition Depot 




The individual storage buildings at the NAD Hingham were fairly small in 
size and constructed of concrete to reduce danger of explosion and fire. 
This Apr. 26, 1922, photograph of Building 15, one of the site's many 
Magazines, is part of an early 1 920s project to document the facilities of the 
First Naval District. BOSTS-8079 

property opened as Wompatuck State Park in 1969. In 1985, GSA 
began the process of transferring the former Army Reserve land to 
the state for addition to the park. In May 1 986, a 1 25-acre portion of 
that site was withdrawn because of the need for environmental 
remediation; the remainder was conveyed to the state in September 
of that year. After the inactive Army Reserve Center was officially 
closed by the 1995 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) round, 
the Army Corps of Engineers undertook the site cleanup under the 
Defense Environmental Restoration Program. The land was ulti- 
mately transferred to the state on May 3, 2004, ending not quite a 
century of military involvement in the Hingham-Cohasset area. 




Ammunition handling was a particularly dangerous activity, and during 
World War II a segregated Navy assigned African-American sailors to such 
duties. On May 11, 1944, freight lighter VF-477 (seen here at the time of her 
completion by Niagara Shipbuilding of Buffalo, N.Y., on Sept. 20, 1943) left 
NAD Hingham to undertake disposal of condemned explosives and rockets 
in deep water off Massachusetts. In addition to the 1 5-man regular Navy 
crew, 16 African-American sailors from the depot were on board. At 12:30 
p.m. an explosion engulfed the vessel, resulting in her sinking within 40 
"ninutes with the loss of six crewmembers and eleven men of the depot 
detachment. This tragic event, blamed in part on inadequate training of 
ardnance handling crews, was overshadowed a little over two months 
ater by the massive explosion at the Port Chicago Naval Magazine in 
California. That July 17,1 944, incident, in which 320 died, is commemo- 
ated by the Port Chicago Naval Magazine National Memorial, established 
)y Congress in 1 992. NARA 



As a military installation, the Naval Ammunition Depot included quarters for 
officers and barracks for sailors and the Marine Corps guard detachment. 
This Aug. 11, 1922, view shows Quarters A, occupied by the Inspector of 
Ordnance in Charge. BOSTS-8189 




As with other military facilities in the area, the NAD benefited from WPA 
projects in the 1 930s. This Dec. 2, 1 937, view shows the widened road- 
way leading to the Administration Building (Building 114). Note the railroad 
tracks which provided for internal movement of munitions. One of the 
many concrete Storehouses (Building 100) is seen at right. BOSTS-8167 




This aerial photograph taken on Aug. 12, 1959, shows the Cohasset Nike 
Site (BO-38). This facility, designated as Battery A, 3rd Missile Battalion, 
52nd Artillery, was one of a series of anti-aircraft missile sites located 
around Boston. U.S. Army Signal Corps 566948 



1 101 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 






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One of the most significant events in the early 1 91 Os was the start of major 
ship construction. Thus, the keel laying for Supply Ship No. 1 , later named 
USS Bridge, was conducted with due ceremony on June 12,1915, includ- 
ing an elaborate printed program (above). The "Young Boys Amateur 
Gang" (right) who drove the first rivet consisted of the children of officers 
assigned to the yard. BOSTS-10537 (right); BOSTS-10540 (above) 



Modernization of Shipbuilding Ways (Shipways 1) com- 
pleted; project included the erection of four hammerhead 
cranes built by McMyler-Interstate. 
Steel-framed lean-to of Building 103 removed and reerected 
as Condemned Stores Shed (Building 142) . 
FY 1916 Naval Appropriations Act provided funding for 
paving; a hot water supply system; and electrical distri- 
bution system extensions. 
Building 64 destroyed by fire. 

Keel of Supply Ship No. 1 (AF-1) laid down on newly- 
modernized Shipways. 
Construction of the Commonwealth Dry Dock begun. 



Mar 3 



May 
June 12 

Oct. 13 



1916 



Apr 



New coaling tower on Coaling Plant (Building 1 09) com- 
pleted. 
May 13 Navy Yard hosted an open house in honor of Navy Day to 
publicize naval preparedness efforts. 
USS Bridge (AF- 1 ) launched. 

FY 1917 Naval Appropriations Act (Naval Expansion Act) 
authorized a massive three-year naval construction pro- 
gram. Four of the auxiliaries authorized under this legisla- 
tion would be assigned to the Charlestown Navy Yard. 
The same act also provided funding for an air-compressor 
plant ( Building 1 08) and toilet and locker facilities. 



May 18 
Aug. 29 











1 f" 






» i 


m 


m 


u 1 P 







•>-_' 



Sailors participate in a weapons demonstration during Navy Day celebra- 
tions on May 13, 1916. The open house was in part intended to show the 
preparedness efforts being made by the Navy brought about by the possi- 
bility that the United States would become involved in the European war 
raging since the summer of 1914. Within two years, this Recreation Field 
would become a storage area filled with temporary sheds. BOSTS-7629 




Apr. 17 
June 21 
Aug. 
Oct. 6 



Dec. 1 



1917 

Addition to north end of Building 125 completed. 
New Garage (Building 1 50), Ordnance Storehouse (Build- 
ing 153), and Band Stand (Building 163) completed. 
Mar. 4 FY 1918 Naval Appropriations Act provided funding for 
construction of a Locomotive & Crane Shed (Building 
144); Power Plant improvements; and an extension of the 
Chain Shop (Building 105). 

The same act also authorized the Navy to lease the Com- 
monwealth Dry Dock for a six-year period provided it was 
built within 30 months. 
United States declared war on Germany. 
Torpedo Testing Barge No. 2 (YTT-2) launched. 
Addition to Central Power Plant (Building 108) completed. 
FY 1918 Deficiency Appropriations Act authorized the 
construction of two Marine Railways, one of which would 
be built at the Charlestown Navy Yard. 
USS Constitution renamed USS Old Constitution. 

1918 

Freight Lighter No. 77 ( YF-77) to Freight Lighter No. 82 
(YF-82) launched. 

Extensions at north end of Restaurant (Building 28), at 
north end of Oil Storage House (Building 131), and at west 
end of Garage (Building 1 50) completed. 
Navy Yard ceased manufacture of wire rope. 
Buildings 43, 1 1 8, and 1 1 9 demolished along with portion 
of Building 42 to accommodate construction of new Ma- 
chine Shop. 

Addition to Paymaster's Office (Building 32) completed. 
Building 1 10 relocated to accommodate construction of 
Marine Railway. 

Mar. General Storehouse (Building 149) completed; work in- 
cluded demolition of Buildings 63 and 64. 

Mar. 12 Lockwood's Basin in East Boston acquired by the Na\ y. 
[pr. 12 Construction of Boston Army Base (Boston Quartermas- 
ter Depot) in South Boston begun. 

Apr. 23 U.S. Army purchased land (57.596 acres) in South Boston 
for Boston Arm) Base from the state for SI .3 million. 



102 



Appendix A, Chronology 



Building USS Pecos (AO-6): A Gallery 



DURING WORLD WAR I, the Navy Yard's shipbuilding efforts ships (oilers), all of which were assigned to Boston. This gallery 
were directed to large naval auxiliaries rather than combatant ships, documents construction of the final ship of the group, USS Pecos 
The Naval Expansion Act of August 29, 191 6, authorized three fuel (AO-6). 




The keel laying took place on the Shipways on June 2, 1 920. A little over a month later, on July 6, 1 920, the bottom of the vessel was 

BOSTS-13927 beginning to take shape. BOSTS-13924 




As the ship's hull began to take shape on the Shipways as seen in the Jan. 
7, 1921, view at left, her engines were being fabricated by the yard's 
shops. At right, the main engines are seen nearing completion in Building 
42's Machine Shop No. 1 . BOSTS-13924 (left); BOSTS-13925 (right) 



By April 22, 1 921 , all was in readiness for launching. Vessels were built so 
that the stern was the first part to enter the water. BOSTS-13928 





following her christening by Miss Anna S. Hubbard, Pecos slid down the 



vays into the water on April 23, 1921. 



BOSTS-13928 



Following launching, much work remained to be done. On July 1 3, 1 921 , 
workers swarm over USS Pecos, berthed at Pier 7 West, even as USS 
Whitney (AD-4) begins to rise on the Shipways. Commissioned on Aug. 
21, 1921, USS Pecos would be sunk by the Japanese on Mar. 1. 1942. 

BOSTS-13924 



- H03 - 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



June 25 New pier and bulkhead line, establishing waterside bound- 
ary of yard, approved; action added approximately 12.35 
acres to the area of the Navy Yard. Jurisdiction over this 
area was ceded to the United States by the Massachu- 
setts General Court by act of July 15, 1 938. 

July Compressor House addition to Central Power Plant (Build- 
ing 108) completed. 

July 1 FY 1 9 1 9 Naval Appropriations Act funded waterfront and 
Power Plant (Building 1 08) improvements and reconstruc- 
tion of the Machine Shop & Foundry (Building 42) 

()i i. 17 ( ongress authorized purchase of Commonwealth Dry Dock 
property. 

Nov. 9 Oxy-Acetylene Generation Plant (Building 165) completed. 

1919 

Additions to Paymaster's Office (Building 32) and General 
Storehouse (Building 149) completed. 
New Scale House (Building 19) completed; complex in- 
cluded both Railroad Scale and Truck Scale and replaced 
original Scale House (Building 19). 
New Steel Storage Shed (Building 187) completed. 

Jan. Addition to Dispensary (Building 1 20) completed. 

Feb. 11 Employment peaked at 12,844. 

May 1 USS Brazos (ACM) launched. 

June 2 USCGC Ossippee inaugurated Marine Railway. 

June 5 Boston Army Base (Boston Quartermaster Depot) in South 
Boston completed. 

July 11 FY 1920 Naval Appropriations Act provided funding for 
"shore facilities for Commonwealth Dry Dock, South Bos- 
ton." 

Rear Adm. Samuel S. Robison assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

Lockwood's Basin in East Boston designated as annex of 
Navy Yard. 
USS i irginia ( BB- 1 3 ) inaugurated Dry Dock 3. 



Yard Commandants, 1919-1935 



July 25 
Sept. 6 

Dec. 22 

. ipr. 28 
June 2 



1920 

Commonwealth Dry Dock (100.929 acres) in South Boston 
purchased by the Navy for $4.3 million; designated as Dry 
Dock 3. 
USS Neches (AO-5) launched. 



1921 

Addition to Pump House (Building 1) at South Boston 
Annex completed along with paving and installation of 
crane rails. 

Capt. CM. Simmers assumed the position of Shipyard 
Manager. 

USS Pecos (AO-6) launched. 

U.S. Ami\ issued re\ ocable permit to U.S. Shipping Board 
for use by the board of most of the wharfage space at the 
Boston Army Base as well as the Wharf Shed (Building 10 
[119]), North Pier Shed ( Building 7 [1 17]), and South Pier 
Shed(Building8[118]). 
May 27 Rear Adm. Albert Gleaves assumed position of Navy Yard 
Commandant. 

Rear Adm. Henry A. Wiley assumed position of Navy Yard 
Commandant. 



Apr. 23 
May 2 




Rear Adm. Samuel S. Robison 

BOSTS-7297 



Rear Adm. Albert Gleaves 

BOSTS-7138 




Rear Adm. Henry A. Wiley Rear Adm. Louis de Steiguer 

BOSTS-7390 BOSTS-7086 




Rear Adm. Philip Andrews 

BOSTS-7005 



Rear Adm. Louis M. Nulton 

BOSTS-7262 




Dec. 31 



Rear Adm. Henry H. Hough 

BOSTS-7165 

1922 

Portal Crane 50 delh ered to Drj Dock 3 at South Boston 

Annex In MeM\ ler-lnterstatc. 
Feb. 6 Washington Naval Arms Limitation Treat} signed. 
Apr. 26 Receiving Ship USS Southeiy (W-26) placed in service. 

1923 
June 14 Rear Adm. Louis de Steiguer assumed position of Navy 

Yard Commandant. 
Oct. 12 USS Whitney (&D-4) launched. 



1 104 



Appendix A, Chronology 



During the 1 920s, as naval construction and repair programs declined, the 
Navy Yard kept busy by contracting its services to the U.S. Shipping Board 
and private shipowners. Of particular value was the new South Boston 
Dry Dock, one of the largest in the world at the time. Here, the White Star 
liner RMS Majestic enters the dock on Nov. 16, 1922. Launched in 1914 as 
the German Bismarck and taken over incomplete by the British as war 
reparations, Majestic was the sister ship of another frequent Dry Dock 3 
visitor in the 1920s, the liner Leviathan (ex- Vaterland), which had served 
as an American troopship during World War I. BOSTS-11897 

1924 

May 24 FY 1925 Naval Appropriations Act provided funding for 
reconstruction of the roof of the Foundry (Building 42-C). 
The same act also authorized construction of additional 
facilities for Dry Dock 3. 

Sept. Replacement of front porches on Quarters L-0 completed. 

1925 

Feb. 11 FY 1926 Naval Appropriations Act provided funding for 
waterfront improvements and replacement of the salt wa- 
ter circulation loop. 

Mar. 3 Congress authorized restoration of USS Old Constitution 
(IX-21), including national subscription fundraising pro- 
gram ("Pennies Campaign") to finance the work. 

July 25 USS Old Constitution ( IX-2 1 ) renamed USS Constitution 
(IX-21). 

Oct. 24 Rear Adm. Philip Andrews assumed position of Navy Yard 
Commandant. 

1926 

Navy Yard employees Albert M. Leahy and Carlton G. Lutts 
invented die-lock chain. 
May 21 FY 1927 Naval Appropriations Act provided funding for 
waterfront improvements. 

1927 

New Pump House & Suction Well (Building 191) com- 
pleted. 

Utility Building (Building 1 3, later Building 14) at South 
Boston Annex constructed utilizing components salvaged 
in 1921 from Navy boiler shop at Providence, R.I. 
June 16 USS ( 'onstitution (IX-2 1 ) entered Dry Dock 1 for restora- 
tion; undocked on Mar. 1 5, 1 930. 

1928 

Die-lock chain adopted as standard anchor chain for the 
Navy. 
May 21 FY 1 929 Naval Appropriations Act provided funding for 
waterfront and Power Plant improvements, as well as elec- 
trical system improvements at Dry Dock 3. 

1929 

Mar. 2 FY 1930 Naval Appropriations Act provided funding for 
waterfront and Power Plant improvements. 

Nov. New kitchen additions on Quarters L-M-N-O completed. 

Dec. Replacement of Navy Yard Boundary Wall along Rope- 
walk with steel picket fence completed. 

1930 

Capt. Ross P. Schlabach assumed position of Shipyard 
Manager. 




Apr. 22 London Naval Arms Limitation Treaty signed. 

June 11 FY 1931 Naval Appropriations Act provided funding to 

continue waterfront and Power Plant improvements. 
June 16 Rear Adm. Louis M. Nulton assumed position of Navy 

Yard Commandant. 
Fall Coal Handling Plant (Building 1 09) demolished except for 

Electrical Substation. 

1931 

— During FY 1 93 1 , following successful tests during FY 1 930, 
the U.S. Lighthouse Service adopted die-lock chain as its 
standard for mooring lightships. 

New Substation (Building 192) south of Building 103 com- 
pleted. 

Feb. 28 FY 1932 Naval Appropriations Act provided funding to 
continue the waterfront improvements program. 

July 1 USS Constitution (IX-2 1 ) recommissioned. 

Sept. 29 Construction of USS Macdonough (DD-351) and USS 
Monaghan (DD-354) assigned to Navy Yard, marking re- 
sumption of ship construction by the yard. 

1932 

Conversion of Building 105 Headhouse into Roundhouse 
for the yard's locomotives completed. 
Feb. 18 Motor Tug KMr-7 J (YMT-15) launched. 

1933 

New Railroad Scale (Structure 234) installed at Scale House 

(Building 19). 
Jan. 15 Harbor Tug YT-11 9 (Y7-W9) launched. 
June 16 Funds allocated under National Industrial Recovery Act 

for the construction of destroyers by the Navy. 
June 30 Rear Adm. Henry H. Hough assumed position of Navy 

Yard Commandant. 
July 12 USS Southery (DC-26) decommissioned as Receiving Ship; 

Receiving Station barracks opened in Building 39. 

1934 

Mar. 27 Vinson-Trammell Act authorized naval construction up to 
treaty limits and replacement of overage ships. 

May 3 Acting Secretary of the Navy established the primary mis- 
sion of the Navy Yard as destroyer construction with a 
secondary mission of manufacturing cordage and chain. 



1105 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Commandant Rear Adm. Walter R. Gherardi (1875-1939) presided over a 
yard that was beginning its new role as a shipbuilder and undergoing 
extensive modernization of its physical plant. Only a few months after his 
arrival, he endorsed the birth of the yard's newspaper, Boston Navy Yard 
News, as a vehicle "to spread good will, to help the Boston Yard by promot- 
ing high craftsmanship, [and] to give us a means of expression whereby 
we may set our goal and obtain directions for reaching it." BOSTS-9026 



May 7 USS Constitution (IX-21) returned to Navy Yard after 
completion of nearly three-year tour around the country; 
decommissioned on June 8, 1934. 

Aug. 22 USS Macdonough (DD-351) launched. 

Nov. 12 Explosion destroyed Acetylene Plant (Building 165) and 
damaged Building 114. 

1935 

Portal Crane 3 delivered by Orton Crane & Shovel Co. 
Two 300-ft. Radio Towers erected near Ropewalk at 6th 
and 9th Sts. 

USS Monaghan (DD-354) launched. 
Congress authorized construction of Marine Barracks 
(Building 15) at South Boston Annex. 
President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 
7034, creating Works Progress Administration; renamed 
Work Projects Administration on July 1, 1939. 
Rear Adm. Walter R. Gherardi assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant 
Sept. 14 USS Case (DD-370) and USS Conyngham (DD-371) 
launched. 



Jan. 9 
Apr 15 

May 6 



June 5 



1936 

Substation addition to Building 104 completed; later re- 
designated Building 224. 

WPA forces undertook repairs/replacement of sun porches 
on Quarters G, L, and 0; remodelling of interior of Build- 
ings 4 and 5 for Naval Reserve activities; modifications to 
Building 36 for Production Division Storage; removal of 
cell block and modifications to Building 38 for Garage Re- 
pair Shop; remodelling of Building 107 for Building Trades 
Shop; and repairs and repainting of Building 1 53 interior 
for Ordnance Storage. 

Jan. 10 First issue of yard newspaper, Boston Navy Yard News 
(after Dec. 1945, Boston Naval Shipyard News) published. 

Apr. 30 Capt. Edmund R. Norton assumed position of Shipyard 
Manager. 

Aug. Garage & Quarters Addition to Building 1 and new Sal- 
vage Stores (Building 193) completed by WPA. 

Sept. 30 USS Constitution (IX-21) entered Dry Dock 1 for minor 
hull repairs; undocked on Oct. 2, 1936. 

Oct. 27 Plaques on Buildings 5 and 1 05 commemorating the Brit- 
ish landings during the Battle of Bunker Hill unveiled. 

Oct. 31 USS Mugford (DD-389) and USS Ralph Talbot (DD-390) 
launched. 

1937 

Buildings 154. 155, 156, and 157 demolished. 

End of Pier 1 rebuilt by WPA forces. 

New Acetylene Plant (Building 165) and Gasoline Filling 





ON THE BATTLE FRONT 






Birr* i>r & pmM€M 






, 1 mw* ■» 




May 10 
Aug. 

Sept. 



Jan. 

Apr 26 

May 14 

May 17 

June 10 
June 25 



Station (Building 1 94) , as well as Garage addition to Boat 
Storehouse (Building 77), completed by WPA. 
New Marine Barracks (Building 15) at South Boston An- 
nex completed by WPA. 
Capt. John W. Woodruff assumed position of Shipyard 
Manager. 

Pier 1 Electrical Substation (Building 109) completed by 
WPA. 

Addition to Marine Corps Administration Building (Build- 
ing 136) completed by WPA. 

1938 

Shipbuilding Ways (Shipways 1) lengthened and widened. 
Addition to Building 47 completed by WPA: project con- 
verted building into Galley & Mess for ship crews. 
Building 131 demolished by WPA. 
Receiving Station barracks moved from Building 39 tc 
Building 33; Building 33 named Frazier Barracks (for Daniel 
Frazier. a seaman on USS Enterprise wounded in actior 
offTripoliin 1804). 

FY 1939 Naval Appropriations Act authorized Structure 
Shop Extension (Building 104). 

USS Mayrant (DD-402) and USS Trippe (DD-403; 
launched. 

Naval Expansion Act signed: directed increased nava 
construction. 

USS Powhatan (YT- 1 28) launched. 
FY 1938 Deficiency Appropriations Act authorized im 
provements to Shipways. 



1106 



Appendix A, Chronology 




In July 1938 two naval officers who would play crucial roles in the Navy 
Yard's expansion just before and in the early days of World War II reported 
for duty. Capt. Charles L. Brand (left) became Manager of the Industrial 
Department, or Shipyard Manager. According to an obituary published in 
the Boston Naval Shipyard News in 1 953, Brand, who was promoted to 
Rear Admiral in Nov. 1941, "personally laid out ... on a drafting table main- 
tained in his office" many of the major buildings added to the yard during his 
tenure. The day after Brand arrived, Rear Adm. William T. Tarrant (right) 
became Commandant of the Navy Yard and the First Naval District. One of 
the major decisions made by him was to promote the development of the 
South Boston Annex. Tarrant left the yard in July 1 942, with Brand follow- 
ing in Oct. of that year. NARA RG181 (left); BOSTS-7340 (right) 

July 25 Capt. Charles L. Brand assumed position of Shipyard 

Manager. 
July 26 Rear Adm. William T. Tarrant assumed position of Navy 

Yard Commandant. 
Dec. Kitchen wing addition to Commandant's House (Quarters 

G) completed by WPA. 

1939 

New Oil Storehouse (Building 131) completed. 

Fuel Oil Pump House (Building 141) moved from original 

location to new location within the yard. 

May 25 FY 1940 Naval Appropriations Act authorized extension 
of Machine Shop (Building 42). 

June 1 Commandant Tarrant appointed board of officers to study 
development of Naval Dry Dock at South Boston. 

June 2 Congress authorized construction of facilities for ship re- 
pair at the Naval Dry Dock, South Boston. 
The same act authorized the acquisition of private dry 
docks at Hunters Point, San Francisco, as an annex to the 
Mare Island Navy Yard. 

June 22 Pipe Shop (Building 195) completed. 

Sept. 3 Great Britain and France declared war on Germany, mark- 
ing start of World War II in Europe. 

Sept. 8 President Franklin D. Roosevelt declared a limited national 
emergency in response to start of World War II in Europe 

Sept. 8 Navy Yard closed to visitors. 

Sept. 18 Congress authorized the acquisition of private dry dock 
at Bayonne, N.J., as an annex to the New York Navy Yard. 

Oct. 20 USS O 'Brien (DD-4 1 5), USS Walke (DD-4 1 6), USS Madi- 
son (DD-425), and USS Lansdale (DD-426) launched. 

1940 

Portal Crane 1 9 delivered by Kaltenbach Corp. 
Mar. 27 Navy received license from the state to fill an area at the 
South Boston Annex in order to construct new jetties. 



Apr. 24 
May 
May 25 
May 31 

June 14 



Aug. 1 



Aug. 10 
Aug. 21 
Aug. 30 
Sept. 9 



Dec. 10 



Jan. 

Jan. 3 

Feb. 13 

Feb. 14 
Feb. 15 
Mar. 
Mar 6 
Mar. 11 

Mar. 17 



Mar. 18 


June 


June 14 


July 


July 28 


Aug. 



USS Meredith (DD-434) launched. 
Extension of Machine Shop (Building 42-A) completed. 
USS Gwin (DD-433) launched. 

USS Wilkes (DD-441) and USS Nicolson (DD-442) 
launched. 

Naval Expansion Act signed; together with act signed on 
July 19, 1940, this legislation authorized the "Two-Ocean 
Fleet" concept. 

Construction of addition to Central Power Plant (Building 
1 08) began; work included demolition of Building 1 1 7 and 
was completed in early 1 942. 

President Franklin D. Roosevelt visited the Navy Yard. 
Seaplane Wrecking Derrick YSD-11 (YSD-1 1 ) launched. 
Covered Lighter YF-2 5 8 (YF-25S) launched. 
FY 1941 Supplemental National Defense Appropriations 
Act authorized construction of Light Shop Activities Build- 
ing (Building 197). 

First Naval District offices moved from Building 39 to North 
Station Industrial Building at 150 Causeway St., Boston; 
later transferred to Fargo Building in South Boston. 

1941 

Addition of Sentry House to Garage & Quarters (Building 
1 ), including demolition of original Building 1 , completed. 
Addition to Administration Building (Building 39) com- 
pleted. 

Crotty Brothers awarded a concession contract to oper- 
ate a civilian cafeteria in Building 36. 
Machine Shop (Building 1 6) at South Boston Annex com- 
pleted. 

Plans to develop South Boston for ship outfitting and 
repair work announced. 

State legislation authorizing extension of Piers 4, 4A, and 
5 beyond the Harbor Commissioners' line approved. 
Seaplane Wrecking Derrick YSD-22 (YSD-22) launched. 
Seaplane Wrecking Derrick YSD-23 (YSD-23) launched. 
New Temporary Storehouse (Building 198) completed. 
Seaplane Wrecking Derrick YSD-20 (YSD-20) launched. 
Lend-Lease Act authorizing construction and leasing of 
war materials and equipment to Great Britain signed. 
USS Humboldt ( AVP-2 1 ) launched. 
FY 1941 Supplemental National Defense Appropriations 
Act authorized purchase of land and construction of hous- 
ing and messing facilities for ships' crews. 
USS Matagorda ( AVP-22) launched. 
Henley St. Gate (Gate 2) opened; granite from wall removed 
at that location used to replace fence in front of 
Commandant's House on Chelsea St. 
USS Forrest ( DD-46 1 ) and USS Fitch (DD-462) launched. 
Navy Yard took over Commonwealth Pier No. 5 (World 
Trade Center). South Boston; used b\ Supply Dept. of 
Navy Yard until Nov. 28, 1945. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts approved donation of 
land (68.196 acres) to the United States for expansion of 
South Boston Annex. 

American Society for Nondestructive Testing organized 
as the American Industrial Radium and X-Ray Society in 



107 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



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r—rti. fU|rf CK4W !»■*• • 1 r I h«r hMHI WTT ik*. •»- 

I 

•*** ** ■ i" •*• ►• ••<» fctrmf li >.< iw 

K> ~«1 —I tfcf - - - Wwl hi Mfrm ■ c. 

IkML ate. l». ,-~.. _f« * Hn iCKt 



i?# 






Building 34; yard employees Philip D. Johnson and Carlton 
G. Lutts were among the original organizers, with Lutts as 
its first chairman. 

Aug. 24 USS Constitution (IX-2 1 ) recommissioned. 

Sept. Shipways 2 completed; project involved demolition of a 
portion of Building 104 and Pier 7. 

Sept. Piers 1 and 2 at South Boston Annex completed; con- 
struction of Piers 3, 4, and 7 and extension of Piers 1 and 2 
at South Boston Annex begun. 

Sept. 27 USS Cowie (DD-632) and USS Knight (DD-633) launched. 

Oct. Concrete Pier 5 completed, replacing wooden Pier 4A. 

Oct. Extension of Pier 6 (formerly Pier 5) completed. 

Oct. New Storehouse (Building 1 99) completed. 

Oct. 1 7 State legislation authorizing construction of Shipbuilding 
Dock ( Dry Dock 5) and associated facilities outside of the 
existing Harbor Commissioners' line approved. 

Nov. U.S. Naval Drydocks, Hunters Point established at the 
former Bethlehem Steel Hunters Point shipyard, purchased 
in Dec. 1939; became San Francisco (Hunters Point) Naval 
Shipyard on Nov. 30, 1945. 

Nov. I Navy Yard assigned construction of twelve escort ves- 
sels (BDE-1 toBDE-12) for transfer to Great Britain. 

Nov. 10 Construction of Shipbuilding Dock (Dry Dock 5) begun 
by J.F. Fitzgerald Construction Co. of Boston; work in- 
cluded demolition of Buildings 139, 141, and 153aswellas 
the Fuel Oil Tank and Gasoline Tank. 

Dec U.S. Naval Drydock, Roosevelt Base, Terminal Island, es- 

tablished; became Terminal Island Naval Shipyard on Nov. 



World War II saw a dramatic change in the composition of the Navy Yard's 
workforce. For the first time, large numbers of women and minorities were 
employed. At left, the shipyard newspaper published a major feature on 
the first woman welder, Peggy Merigo, in its Jan. 14,1 943, issue. 




The diversity in the workforce is 
seen in these two artworks by Af- 
rican-American artists and yard 
employees. The painting above 
by Calvin Burnett depicts the Navy 
Yard Employees Band, while the 
watercolor at right by Allan Rohan 
Crite is entitled "Have Your Pass 
Ready" and depicts workers leav- 
ing the yard. BNHP (above): 
Boston Athenaeum (right) 




Dec. 
Dec. 7 

Dec. 10 

Dec. 26 

Dec. 31 



Feb. 



Feb. 
Feb. 



30, 1945, and Long Beach Naval Shipyard in Mar. 1948. 
Construction of West. North. last, and South Jetties at 
South Boston Annex completed. 

Japanese forces attacked Pearl Harbor; United States de- 
clared war on Japan on Dec. 8 and on Germany and Italy 
on Dec. 1 1 . 

USS Doran (DD-634) and USS Earle (DD-635) launched. 
Fargo Buildings (3.5 acres) on Summer St. m South Bos- 
ton acquired by Navy under eminent domain procedures. 
Sludge Removal Barge YSR-3 (YSR-3) launched. 

1942 

Waterfront Office (Building 109). Public Works Adminis- 
tration Building (Building 200). and Industrial Service 
Buildings (Buildings 21 lA-C)on Pier 5 completed. 
Navy Yard took delivery of Portal Cranes 62-69 from Ameri- 
can Hoist & Derrick Co.; cranes 62 and 65 assigned to Pier 
5. crane 63 to Dry Dock 3 at South Boston Annex, crane 64 
to Dry Dock 5, cranes 66-68 to South Boston Annex jet 
ties, and crane 69 to Pier 7 at South Boston Annex. 
New Light Shop (Building 197) and north and east exten 
sions of the Pipe & Shipfitters Shop (Building 195) com 
pleted. 

Reconstruction of Marine Railway 1 1 completed. 
New NavalNet Depot (Building Ph structural Shop (Build 



n OS 



Appendix A, Chronology 



ing 1 8), Temporary Storehouse ( Building 1 1 >), Administra- 
tion Building (Building 2 1 ), and Crews' and Officers' Wash- 
rooms (Buildings 22. 23) as well as addition to Marine 
Barracks ( Building 1 5) at South Boston Annex completed. 
South Boston Annex officially designated U.S. Naval Dry 
Dock, South Boston. 

USS Guest (DD-472) and USS Hutchins (DD-476) 
launched. 

Frazier Barracks (Building 33) ceased to function as Re- 
ceiving Ship Boston. 

Keels of HMS Bayntun (BDE-1 ) and HMS Bazely (BDE-2) 
laid in incomplete Dry Dock 5. 

USS Bennett (DD-473) and USS Fullam (DD-474) 
launched. 

Area occupied by Marine Railways 12 and 13 officially 
designated as the Chelsea Annex of the Boston Navy 
Yard; this property had been purchased from Green's Ship- 
yard and Boston Dry Dock Co., respectively, in 1 94 1 . 
Navy awarded ownership of Chelsea Street Garage (Build- 
ing 204) (0.383 acres) following successful eminent do- 
main proceedings. 

Tirrell Estate (17.29 acres) in South Boston acquired by 
the Navy under eminent domain for use as "K" Street 
Annex. 

Underground Water Storage Tanks (Structures 220, 221, 
223) completed. 

USS Hudson (DD-475) and USS Charrette (DD-581) 
launched. 

Navy Fire Fighters School at "K" Street Annex commis- 
sioned. 

HMS Bayntun (BDE-1) and HMS Bazely (BDE-2) 
launched. 

Rear Adm. Wilson Brown, Jr., assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

USS Connor (DD-582) and USS Hall (DD-5 83) launched. 
USS LST-301 (LST-30 1 ), USS LST-302 (LST-302), USS LST- 
303 (LST-303), and USS LST-304 (LST-304) launched; all 
four ships would be transferred to Great Britain in Nov. 
1942. 

Reconstruction of Marine Railways 12 and 13 at Chelsea 
Annex completed. 

USS LST-305 (LST-305) and USS LST-306 (LST-306) 
launched. 

Capt. Earl F. Enright assumed position of Shipyard Man- 
ager. 

Dry Dock 5 completed. 

Power Plant (Building 20) and Shop Building (Building 53) 
at South Boston Annex completed. 
USS LST-307 (LST-307) and USS LST-308 (LST-308) 
launched. 

HMS Berry (BDE-3),HMS Blackwood (BDE-4),USSLST- 
309 (LST-309), and USS LST-3 1 (LST-3 1 0) launched. 
Construction of U.S. Naval Fuel Depot Annex in East Bos- 
ton completed; work had begun in Jan. 1 942 and the facil- 
ity became usable in Aug. 1942. 
USS Evarts (DE-5) and USS Wyffels (DE-6) launched. 



Wartime Commandants 

The Commandants of the Navy Yard during World War 1 1 spent much of their 
time performing ceremonial duties, as seen in these three views. 



Rear Adm. Wilson Brown, Jr., 
poses with the sponsor of the as- 
yet-unnamed escort vessel BDE- 
5, Miss Rhoda C. Grady (center), 
and her mother, Mrs. Ronan C. 
Grady, at the launching ceremony 
on Dec. 7, 1942. Her father, Capt. 
Ronan C. Grady, was Captain of 
the Yard. BOSTS-11076 




On Feb. 1 3, 1 943, five days after as- 
suming command, Rear Adm. Robert 
A. Theobald addresses yard work- 
ers on the occasion of the presenta- 
tion to the Navy Yard of a two-star 
Army-Navy "E" (Efficiency) banner. 
BOSTS-13352 




Rear Adm. Felix X. Gygax looks on as Mrs. Marjorie Guile christens USS 
Marlboro (APB-38) on Shipways 2 on Nov. 1 7, 1 944. Mrs. Guile had been 
chosen as sponsor because her husband, Marcus H. Guile, an employee 
of the Inside Machine Shop, had been one of the top recipients of beneficial 
suggestion awards. BOSTS-11920 



Jan. 



Jan. 9 



1943 

Portal Cranes 87-89 delivered by Marion Steam Shovel 
Co.; crane 87 assigned to Pier 1 and cranes 88-89 assigned 
to Dry Dock 4 at South Boston Annex. 
Portal Cranes 90-91 delivered to South Boston Annex by 
Kaltenbach Corp.: crane 90 assigned to jetties and crane 
91 assigned to Dry Dock 4. 

Steel Storage Shed addition on north side of Boiler Shop 
(Building 106) completed. 

Margaret "Peggy" Merigo became first qualified female 
welder as women began to take jobs in Navy Yard indus- 
trial shops. 

USS Griswold (DE-7), USS Steele (DE-8), USS Carlson 
(DE-9), and USS Bebas (DE- 1 0) launched. 



1 1 09 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 
Ship Christening — USS Earle (DD-635): A Gallery 



THE CONCEPT OF CHRISTENING a warship can be traced as far 
back as ancient Babylonia. From its beginnings in the 1790s, 
the United States Navy has followed this tradition, which involves 
a sponsor breaking a bottle of liquid over the ship's bow. While 
early sponsors were male, by the 1 840s the Navy had adopted the 
practice of female sponsors. 

The shipyard archives includes extensive files on ship chris- 
tening ceremonies compiled by the aide to the Commandant. This 
gallery includes a selection of the documents, as well as several of 
the pictures taken on the occasion, for USS Earle (DD-635), launched 
on December 1 0, 1 94 1 (see Chapter 2 for a photograph of this launch). 

For ships such as destroyers named for individuals, the spon- 
sor was usually a female relative of the person being honored. Thus, 
when the Navy determined in 1941 to name Destroyer No. 635 for 
the late Rear Adm. Ralph Earle ( 1 874- 1 939), who had been Chief of 
the Bureau of Ordnance during World War I and, following his re- 
tirement, president of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) in 
his native Worcester, Mass., it consulted his widow, who suggested 
that their daughter Mary be given the honor of sponsoring the 
vessel. In keeping with tradition, the Navy would identify the spon- 
sor in all official documents only as Mrs. John Fore Hines, Jr. 

Once the sponsor had been determined, the Navy Yard Com- 



mandant had the duty of arranging the christening ceremony. This 
involved contacting the sponsor and obtaining the names of indi- 
viduals whom she desired be present on the occasion. Once the 
final launch date was settled, formal invitations were sent out to 
these guests. In the case of USS Earle, they included a large num- 
ber of faculty and staff from WPI as well as friends and relatives of 
the admiral and his daughter. 

During the 1930s and 1940s, the Navy Yard utilized bottles of 
domestic champagne for ship christenings. These bottles were deco- 
rated with a plate commemorating the occasion and held in wooden 
boxes. The yard also purchased American beauty roses as a gift to 
the sponsor. For USS Earle, the Navy authorized the yard to spend 
not more than $250 for the ceremony. 

On the day of the christening, the sponsor was met by the 
Commandant and escorted to the site of the launching, in this case 
Shipways 2. At the appointed time, Mrs. Hines swung the bottle 
against the bow of the ship while reciting the words, "I christen thee 
USS Earle" Upon the breaking of the bottle, shipyard workers 
removed the wedges keeping the hull in place and the ship slid 
stern-first into the waters of Boston Harbor. A tug then maneuvered 
the vessel to the location where fitting out work would be done. 



.-.'■i: 



Ptmm 

To I 






Wbtir 



U4] 



Ha Oblaf .ft th« buram »f Kartgatiftft. 

hntD, hiiKiiiiwt'.i, 



Brbjoetf Rr«. Jotn P. Mxmm, /», 
UBS KAUJC (MOW)* 



Bpoaaor far 



It, WMrtkKi Titfa tha irt.t-** of Ktj. EaJpfe 
B*;U th* Ac'.Lnc flacratarj ot UN H*i», Soncrwh]* Jaana 
Farraatal, ku Ua',(fi*\ci Mr*, jatan T. IlA*», Jr. of 3T 
St. Ima'.M Rs»i1, Ariaorm, tmzcuijlimnl* ■>• tpxior far tb* 
OM BA>li , M»d la luur sf bar ftthar, ttx lata k**r 
A*al.r*i noijfa Earl., II,*. »*»j 4 



S, 



till jou ;l»ui itjit^ with 
clad with t%a It 



llMi all 



I. *, iibit* 

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"ttlua 



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C«. :. Vi.r.) 
Har.r.lnt 13 I 
Supply OTtltar 
aid* 






I.I .... 



FU» 
lacoaino. 



This memorandum dated Oct. 9, 1941, from the Bureau of Navigation in 
Washington notified the Navy Yard Commandant of the identity of the spon- 
sor for USS Earle and directed him to arrange the details of the ceremony 
with her. Note the name of the bureau chief, then an obscure naval officer 
but soon to become one of the best-known naval figures of World War II, 
Chester W.Nimitz. BOSTS-15404 



D«t«fcW lb, 1 U. 



[i*»f kr». .-lnaa: 



DM ^HaUiUI, AdaOral Tarraat, 
. u*t ^tu Ua-uraaa 1/ laa Cblaf at U* frart 
•r navigation toat /oti jur« •+** tMliuM »t 
U* ■ ■ u atary «tf W* mj *a tiouar for «*• 
U.»»*. IAHUI m* aa««* (DUtruitiM at tit* .■«•' 
VM MTy Taj*. 

*« tri* (iHtBt irliui baa t*»i»tlv« 
data far v,» laueabi** or tha IamU 1» .vaaabar 
15, J*U. 1 »1U lafara r«« l*l*r, yntmtXr a 
*MVa la aliUH, tha ****% fata of tha lauaa*. 
Ua ana aha dat»ll* la HUHilia ti trollo. 

la Ui> aataatlaa, *1U j«u ;laa»a i*t 
MM C aMab M liiil un illHif Vlmi to aaoa 
/dfc alaa t« oar* lultalluna aaat: *• Ma M«r 
tard i» bo* *U*«a la caaaral alaltirt ■, 11 la 
. M.atMry tfaat tba Inritaa tuatla l-a raatriataa 
la Htttr, arafaroklr M ****« aba are m]«Um 
•ad 1 — i l ata w*»fl *f reur faa.lj. 

farj alMaral/ f«ur>, 



Kra. Job* r. 

. t. .ui» ual 
a**a»«ra, "faajfllaala 



On Oct. 16, 1941, 
Aide to the Comman- 
dant Lt. Cmdr. Brooke 
Schumm sent this 
letter to the sponsor 
informing her of the 
tentative date of the 
launching and ask- 
ing for her guest list. 
BOSTS-15404 



One of the most in- 
teresting items in the 
file is this informal 
note which accom- 
panied the formal 
notification letter. It 
reveals that Cmdr. 
Schumm was a 
friend of Mrs. Hines, 
whose husband 
was a fellow Navy 
officer, and is the 
only document in the 
file to address Mrs. 
Hines by her own 
given name. 

BOSTS-15404 



1*. 1*41. 



^a» Maryi 

'1**m aaauaa taa foraal.t/ «f t&a 
aaaloa«4 Ltl*r, ba* ftaa Uo 11 vault o**«r 
«* t» ti.ta lt loa* 1M urrial.l riaTort 

NMJ ua Iir. la«cU s forwrt to 
«MU4 >«-. ut /otutajr a*t Urt fasllj at... 
/on aoaa to aaatM. 

1 aaaw jroa auat U* aJiJarlacafJw 
i-w* «*.«?. Uaa U *kmi •■, baa I baTht 
va laaa a «ooa HUM adaa I a*. 



• Ibi HU.il racart*. 



WT». .uka r. Llaaa it. 
}t *l. 7aul* .«*4 

J aaaarl*«o..a 



1110 



Appendix A, Chronology 



Ship Christening— USS Earle (DD-635): A Gallery 



IM*«r «, l»4i. 



Uf aaar Urm, Maaa: 

■Jha laauollu* tl-ao lor Um U,i,3, 
>■■!! ku baaa darioitalj Ml for Yadnaaaajr, 

Daaaabar iota, at 1; JO r.M. 

!ha la.illati.o&a to tt« guaata 
alll La hqI oat a_-irU7, In auaraana* «JWi 
U* 1U* fMI anaalttaa la at aMU. 



aatlalpatLng ti.a plaa 

■Laf ?*• »t «aa lau*4blM. f I ml, 

llnaaralj | aaa» 



UaaaV, faaialaf. . . . 

JUaa to tba Giaaaanaaatu 



Kr»» J. 7. IUm, Jr, 

>? M. rati' a aoaa 
axoaara, j acxaylranla 



This follow-up letter 
from Cmdr. Schumm 
informed the sponsor 
of the final date of 
launching and that in- 
vitations were about 
to be sent. At this 
point in time, the invi- 
tations were done in 
the form of individual 
letters. Later, formal 
printed invitations 
would be used to re- 
duce the workload as 
the number of chris- 
tenings grew. 

BOSTS-15404 




Immediately prior to the ceremony, a shipyard photographer took pictures 
of the sponsor and her party. Mrs. Hines (center) holds her bouquet of 
roses. At far left is her husband, Lt. Cmdr. John F. Hines, Jr., while Rear 
Adm. William T. Tarrant stands at right. Flanking Mrs. Hines are her mother 
and Mrs. M. E. Trench. BOSTS-11011 




Two days before the 
ceremony, the yard 
photographed the 
"christening fluid" 
and its container. 
BOSTS-11011 



A tugboat has taken charge of the newly-launched destroyer and is begin- 
ning to maneuver her away from the Shipways towards her fitting out 
location. Note the remains of the launching cradle under the hull to the right 
of her number. BOSTS-11011 






M 



at, kfaV 



(MM) 

l»:> *»om laa, a,. »*-af.j) srr/M-u or ™. >, iut> 
EM 



taa riaanli.a, l.rr TtM, *,«*.. 
"f*. at salaa. 



*a M» JUUa limJJl aai I Jul Aaa alaa/i la, 4 

taa Man lava at 1J16 (*rT) an »■ an i«i#, l ..a.r au, Ui, 



J. 
at taa Baal 
JiLLrai/,. taa lauaaaUt *f Ua Mo .«*.*► I J<%J*, 



ntarataa (a]l 
>>1 M* ua 



lha faLLowta* InTaraaUiBi La femtaaaa, a* r*-*lfM to- 



(») 



w 



ava. Jaaa 7, <4U*» .'r, 
TT *t. ramia aaaa 
Iraaora, r«7nj/.Tnr-U 

aj a 



arm, half*. ^rU .<~..aar*i aaiaarl, JatrW if M 
Uawt, 3laaT. Anr t. aaaa* A., M I.Sjwraar'a I 
■*«. aV ». " 



aa a/ dUtUa Hi lala hMUi 

aaar adalnu b. f, Ourartaa, ILU fiUka) 

H i i ll », 1. a - ill, tajrar af mnm f, aaaa. 

aM an, »*.«au 
'nilaut filliaa «*»»! *f Clan Lnl¥ar«lty, aaa 



jaa. aaafku* -al-i— .»~i 



fttfhJMI 

M 



a*. U1U >:&joJ5.' 



U3. 



far HiiiUa af 



Mr*. Jaan *• llaM Jr. la Un aMarfitar af taa Lata 
aaar Malnl laloti aula. U.j.s., Tar aaaa tba aals 
la I 



IT! aaaa ana Una af flald aaaa. 

Mar** aa. lark IUK aaaaatla ahaaaa««a, 

{«> Taa UM lalLI la tba 7fVa aaaaa* laH aaaa at 
Jam. 



Mar, 



ft i In 






Following the christening and launching, the Commandant submitted a for- 
mal report to the Bureau of Ships. It enclosed copies of the photographs 
taken on the occasion, and provided information on the sponsor and her 
party as well as other distinguished guests. BOSTS-15404 




ll ll 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 




When he reported to duty as Ship- 
yard Manager in Oct. 1942, Capt. 
Earl F. Enright (left) was no stranger 
to the facility. He had previously 
served as assistant to the Produc- 
tion Officer in 1920 and 1921 and 
as Production Officer from 1 927 to 
1933. BOSTS-13352 



Jan. 


26 


Feb. 




Feb. 


8 


Feb. 


9 


Feb. 


22 



Mar. 



Mar. 


10 


Mar. 


19 


Apr. 




Apr. 


6 



Apr. 10 

Apr. 22 
. Ipr. 24 



USS Crouter (DE-1 1 ) and HMS Burges (BDE- 12) launched. 
Extensive rehabilitation and construction of new facilities 
at Chelsea Annex completed. 

Rear Adm. Robert A. Theobald assumed position of Navy 
Yard Commandant. 

U.S. Naval Dry Docks, Roosevelt Base, Terminal Island, 
Calif, formally established. 

USS Seid (DE-256), USS Smartt (DE-257), USS Walter S. 
Brown (DE-258), and USS William C. Miller (DE-259) 
launched. 

Sub-Assembly Shop (Building 30), Ordnance Shop (Build- 
ing 3 1 ), Supply Department (Building 32), Boiler House 
(Building 46), and Cafeteria (Building 48) at South Boston 
Annex completed. 

USS Cabana (DE-260) and USS Dionne (DE-261) 
launched. 

USS Halligan (DD-584) and USS Haraden (DD-585) 
launched. 

Extension of Piers 4, 7, 8, and 9 completed. 
USS Canfield (DE-262), USS Deede (DE-263), USS Elden 
(DE-264), and USS Cloues (DE-265) launched. 
Capt. Adrian R. Matron assumed position of Shipyard 
Manager. 

USS Wintle (DE-266) and USS Dempsey (DE-267) launched. 
USS Wakefield (AP-21) inaugurated Dry Dock 4, South 
Boston Annex. 





Throughout World War II, yard workers were encouraged to participate in 
war bond and blood drives. Many celebrities lent their services to such 
campaigns. Here actor James Cagney entertains workers in front of Build- 
ing 197 in Oct. 1943. BOSTS-13352 



Enright's successor as Manager, Capt. Adrian R. Marron, is seen with 
Acting Secretary of the Navy James V. Forrestal (left) and Vice Chairman 
of the War Production Board Charles Wilson during an inspection of the 
Ropewalkon May 5, 1944. Eighteen months later, as a part of the reorga- 
nization that separated the posts of Navy Yard and First Naval District 
Commandants, Marron would become the first Commander of the Boston 
Naval Shipyard. BOSTS-13352 

June 4 USS hovering (DE-272) and USS Sanders (DE-273) 
launched. 

July New Incinerator (Building 203). and Locker & Toilet (Build- 
ing 206) and extensions of Riggers Shop (Building 24), 
Telephone Building (Building 3 1 ), Frazier Barracks (Build- 
ing 33), Administration Building (Building 39). Paint & Oil 
Storehouse (Building 13 1 ), Pipe Shop (Building 195), and 
Storehouse (Building 199) completed. 

July Labor Board and Personnel Division addition to Rope- 
walk (Building 58) completed. 

July New Security Building ( Building 24). Garage & Locomo- 
tive House (Building 28), Dispensary & Fire Station (Build- 
ing 29), Public Works Shop (Building 49). Trainer Building 
(Building 55), Sen ice Building ( Building 56). and Gun Shed 
(Building 58), and additions to Machine Shop (Building 
1 6). Administrative Building (Building 2 1 ). and Police Build- 
ing (Building 23 I at South Boston Annex completed. 
Employment peaked at 50, 1 28 persons, of whom 8,348 were 
women. 

USS New comb (DD-586) and USS Bennion (DD-662) 
launched. 

HMS Gardiner (DE-274), HMS Goodall(DE-215). HMS 
Goodson (DE-276), and HMS Gore (DE-277) launched. 
HMS Keats (DE-278) and HMS Kempthorne (DE-279) 
launched. 

Navy awarded ownership of parcel of land (0.321 acres) 
adjacent to the west side of the Navy Yard at Wapping St. 
following successful eminent domain proceedings. 
Chelsea Annex placed m active use. 
HMS Kingsmill ( DE-280). HMS Lawford (DE-5 1 6). HMS 
Louis (DE-5 1 7), and HMS Lawson (DE-5 1 8) launched. 

Aug. 19 Navy Yard issued request for proposals for construction 
of extension to Forge Shop (Building 105). 



1112 



Appendix A, Chronology 

Aug. 30 HMS Lindsay (DE-519) and HMS Loring (DE-520) 

launched. 
Sept. 12 USS Cassin Young{DD-793) launched by Bethlehem Steel 

Co.. Shipbuilding Division, San Pedro, Calif. (Bethlehem 

Steel Hull 90 16). 
Sept. 15 Construction of unnamed escort vessels DE-801 to DE- 

832 cancelled. 
Sept. 24 HMS Hoste (DE-521), HMS Moorsom (DE-522), HMS 

Manners (DE-523), and HMS Mounsey (DE-524) launched. 
Oct. 6 USS Heywood L. Edwards (DD-663) and USS Richard P. 

Leary (DD-664) launched. 
Oct. 7 USS Edward H. Allen (DE-53 1 ) and USS Tweedy (DE-532) 

launched. 
Nov. Rehabilitation of Piers 6 and 7 completed. 
Nov. I Number of women workers peaked at 8,520. 
Nov. 2 HMS Inglis (DE-525), HMS Inman (DE-526), USS O 'Toole 

(DE-527), and USS John J. Powers (DE-528) launched. 
Nov. 8 USS Howard F. Clark (DE-533) and USS Silverstein (DE- 

534) launched. 
Nov. 1 7 USS Mason (DE-529) and USS John M. Bermingham (DE- 

530) launched. 
Dec. 7 USS Lewis (DE-535), USS Bivin (DE-536), USS Rizzi (DE- 

537), and USS Osberg (DE-538) launched. 
Dec. 1 7 USS Sheehan (DE-541 ) and USS Oswald A. Powers (DE- 

542) launched; completion cancelled on Jan. 7, 1 946, and 

incomplete ships scrapped. 
Dec. 27 USS Wagner (DE-539) and USS Vandivier (DE-540) 

launched; completion suspended on Feb. 17, 1947. 



BOSTON NWY YARD 




truii. ir. i'ii 

l - •• Lift *»• 



ii».«j k nM<iim 



As World War II progressed, the 
Navy Yard prepared formal pro- 
grams for ship launchings. These 
provided a detailed timeline for the 
accomplishment of the various tasks 
required to launch a ship, and iden- 
tified the ship sponsors. As this pro- 
gram illustrates, most of the LSTs 
were built as side-by-side pairs. 

BOSTS-15404 



■ i ■ ' r 



ai aching or Tltt L>rr >W- I.ST »» . 



m«« 



\T-rn. 



■ ~~ »«•-• I* 



wrm V* •«»*• WP' 






>ii« *m* Mmm mmat «^mt I 



r«* 


■■ i i m9m in 


in. 


lIMM 


ini 


piMpn mi~m 


in* 


UlnuAlp « hal i^ i*H m 


IT» 


i (Mi •••* - • *•" ■*— ■ 1 




1 !>• *»*>«. 




1 LtlWJt 


in» 


«■ BtMtn imam n 




One of the most significant steps on the road that led to the desegregation 
of the U.S. Navy involved the Boston-built escort vessel USS Mason (DE- 
529), whose crew consisted of African-American sailors. Commanding 
Officer Lt. Cmdr. William M. Blackford is seen with part of the crew on her 
fantail during commissioning ceremonies on Mar. 20, 1 944. 

NARA80-G-218856 

Dec 31 USS Cassin Young (DD-793) commissioned at San Pedro, 
Calif. 

1944 

Extension of Waterfront Office (Building 109) and bar- 
racks addition to Building 1 98 completed. 
Jan. 27 USS Groves (DE-543) and USS Alfred ^//'(DE-544) 

launched; completion cancelled on Sept. 5, 1944, and in- 
complete ships scrapped. 
Jan. 27 USS LST-980 (LST-980) and USS LST-981 (LST-981) 

launched. 
Feb. 10 USS LST-982 (LST-982) and USS LST-983 (LST-983) 

launched. 
Feb. 10 Portal Crane 91 placed in service at Dry Dock 4. 
Feb. 25 USS LST-984 (LST-984) and USS LST-985 (LST-985) 

launched. 
Mar. 5 USS LST-986 (LST-986) and USS LST-987 (LST-987) 

launched. 
Mar. 12 USS LST-988 (LST-988) and USS LST-989 (LST-989) 

launched. 
Mar. 13 Construction of unnamed escort vessels DE-425 to DE- 

437 cancelled. 
Mar. 20 USS Mason (DE-529) commissioned; ship was first to have 

an African-American crew. 
Mar. 27 USS LST-990 (LST-990) and USS LST-991 (LST-991) 

launched. 
Apr. 7 USS LST-992 (LST-992) and USS LST-993 (LST-993) 

launched. 
Apr. 17 USS LST-994 (LST-994) and USS LST-995 (LST-995) 

launched. 
May 2 USS LST-996 (LST-996) and USS LST-997 (LST-997) 

launched. 
May 14 USS LST-998 (LST-998) and USS LST-999 (LST-999) 

launched. 
May 26 USS LST-1 000 {LST-\00Q) and USS LST- 100! (LST-1001 ) 

launched. 
June 8 USS LST-1 002 (LST-1002) andUSS LST-1 003 (LST-1003) 

launched. 



1113 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



The LST: A Gallery 



MORE THAN ANY OTHER TYPE of vessel built by the Navy 
Yard during World War II, the Tank Landing Ship, or LST, 
reflected the nature of the conflict. The LST was a direct result of 
the requirement to bring troops and equipment to enemy shores. 
During the war, the Navy ordered 1 1 54 LSTs. Of these, 47 were 
allocated to Charlestown. In addition, the yard built six self-pro- 
pelled barracks ships (APB) which employed a modified version of 
the LST hull. These vessels were built in pairs on the yard's 
shipways. The sponsors of the LSTs were either female yard work- 
ers or the wives of workers who had received awards for their con- 
tributions to the war effort. 

The primary features of the LST were a shallow draft, which 
allowed the ship to reach beaches, and the bow doors and ramps to 
permit vehicles to be driven directly off the ship. 

The spaciousness of the LST led to its conversion into a series 



of different types of repair ship. Some of these conversions oc- 
curred after the LST had been in service, while many were commis- 
sioned as LSTs only long enough for them to sail to shipyards 
where they would be fitted out for their new roles. 

The last three LSTs ordered from the Navy Yard, only two of 
which would be completed following the end of hostilities, were 
intended as experimental ships, employing traditional steam power 
plants instead of the diesel engines used on their sisters. 

While most Boston-built LSTs were sold for scrap or conver- 
sion to commercial operation between 1 946 and 1 948, eight survived 
to receive "county" names in 1955. Several of these ships, along 
with the barracks ships, would go on to see active combat service 
during the Vietnam War, serving both as "mother ships" for the fleet 
of small riverine warfare craft and as supply carriers. 




Because a number of LSTs, including several of Boston-built ships, partici- 
pated in Operation Overlord, the June 1 944 invasion of Normandy, under 
the White Ensign as British ships, they wore large nationality letters as well 
as their numbers. Here, USS LST-310 unloads a truck onto either Omaha or 
Utah Beach. NARA 



While the first Boston-built LSTs saw service in the Mediterranean and 
European Theaters, later ships formed part of the amphibious forces in the 
Pacific. Here LST-990 and several sisters are seen at Leyte in the Philip- 
pines. NavSource 





Three Boston-built LSTs became landing craft repair ships. With her bow 
doors open, USS Poseidon (ARL-12, ex-LST-1037) tends to several types 
of landing craft off Okinawa in 1 945. NavSource 



A number of LSTs were converted into hospital ships for the evacuation of 
wounded soldiers and marines from beachheads. USS LST(H)-1033was 
the only Boston-built ship so converted. Note the "H" following her number 
in this view taken at Subic Bay, Philippine Islands, on July 18,1 945. 

NavSource 

A few Boston-built LSTs had lengthy postwar careers. After winning two 
battle stars for involvement in the Iwo Jima and Okinawa invasions, USS 
Monmouth Counfy (LST-1 032) would be reactivated in 1965 and sent to 
Vietnam. She isseenhereatVungTau, South Vietnam, ca. 1968. 

Robert M. Young, NavSource 




1I14 



Appendix A, Chronology 



Construction of USS Harold J. Ellison (DE-545), USS 
Myles C. Fox (DE-546), USS Charles R. Ware (DE-547), 
USS Carpellotti (DE-548), USS Eugene A. Greene (DE- 
549), USS Gyatt (DE-550), USS Benner (DE-55 1 ), USS Ken- 
neth D. Bailey (DE-552), USS Dennis J. Buckley (DE-553), 
USS Everett F. Larson (DE-554), USS Rogers Blood (DE- 
555), USS William R. Rush (DE-556), USS William M. Wood 
(DE-557), and five unnamed ships (DE-558 to DE-562) can- 
celled; names reassigned by the Navy to destroyers built 
elsewhere. 

USS LST-1028 (LST- 1028) and USS LST-1 029 (LST- 1029) 
launched. 

USS LST-1030 (LST-1030) and USS LST-1031 (LST- 1 03 1 ) 
launched. 

USSZS7/-70J2(LST-1032)andUSSLSr-/033(LST-1033) 
launched. 

Navy acquired parcel of land (0.32 1 acres) outside of yard 
between Wapping St. and Henley St. following success- 
ful eminent domain proceedings. 

Caisson barges YC-1147 {YC-\ 147) and YC-U48(YC-\ 148) 
completed. 

Construction of USS Dorado (SS-526), USS Comber (SS- 
527), USS Sea Panther (SS-528), USS Tiburon (SS-529), 
and unnamed SS-537 through SS-544 cancelled. 
USSLS7/-/O34(LST-lO34)andUSSLS7W035(LST-lO35) 
launched. 

USS APL-ll (APL-11) and USS APL-12 (APL-12) 
launched. 

USSLSr-/036(LST-1036)andUSSLSr-70J7(LST-1037) 
launched. 

USS APL-13 (APL-13) and USS APL-32 (APL-32) 
launched. 

RearAdm. Felix X. Gygax assumed position of Navy Yard 
Commandant. 

USS Marlboro (APB-38) and USS Mercer (APB-39) 
launched. 

USS APL-33 (APL-33) and USS APL-34 (APL-34) 
launched. 

USS Amberjack (SS-522), USS Grampus (SS-523), USS 
Pickerel (SS-524), and USS Grenadier (SS-525) launched. 

1945 

New seawall between Piers 5 and Piers 6 and 7 completed. 

USS Tortuga (LSD-26) launched. 

USS Lancetfish (SS-296) sank at Pier 8 West; salvaged on 

Mar. 23, 1 945, but decommissioned. 

Construction of unnamed destroyers DD-905 to DD-908 

cancelled. 

USS Donner (LSD-20) launched. 

USS Benewah (APB-35) and USS Nueces (APB-40) 

launched. 

V-E Day; end of World War II in Europe. 

USS Fort Mandan (LSD-2 1 ) launched. 

Covered lighters YF-891 (YF-891 ) and YF-892 (YF-892) 

launched. 

USS Colleton (APB-36) launched. 

USS Whetstone (LSD-27) launched. 



July 28 USS ( 'onstitution (IX-2 1 ) entered Dry Dock 1 for minor 
hull repairs; undockedon Aug. 2. 1945. 

July 30 USS Echols (APB-37) and covered lighter YF-893 (YF- 
893) launched. 

Aug. 14 V-J Day; end of World War II in the Pacific; Navy Yard 
workers received a two-day holiday to celebrate the occa- 
sion. 

Sept. USS ( Onstitution (IX-2 1 ) reopened to public visitation. 

Nov. 30 The Navy instituted the first major reorganization of the 
shore establishment since the establishment of naval dis- 
tricts in 1903. 

Boston Navy Yard redesignated Boston Naval Shipyard; 
U.S. Naval Dry Docks, South Boston, redesignated as 
South Boston Annex, Boston Naval Shipyard; Commo- 
dore Adrian R. Marron assigned as Shipyard Commander. 
This reorganization separated command of the yard from 
that of the First Naval District, although the District Com- 
mandant would continue to live in the Commandant's 
House until 1976. 

1946 

The Federal Employees Veterans Association (FEVA) or- 
ganized under the leadership of leadingman welder Ken- 
neth T Lyons to represent returning veterans in the fed- 
eral workforce. FEVA became a national organization in 
1947 and was reorganized as the National Association of 
Government Employees (NAGE) on July 16, 1961. 
— Boston Group, Atlantic Reserve ( 1 6th) Fleet, established 
at South Boston to house "mothballed" ships, particu- 
larly escort aircraft carriers. 

Construction of USS LST-1155 (LST- 1155) cancelled. 
USS Cassin Young (DD-793) decommissioned at San 
Pedro, Calif. 

USS LST- 11 54 (LST- 1 1 54) launched. 
Tennis Courts (Structure 236) completed. 
Capt. Wesley McL. Hague assumed position of Shipyard 
Commander. 
Dec. 31 First Shore Station Development Plan issued. This master 
plan for future development of the Navy Yard would be 
continually updated over the next quarter century. 



Jan. 7 


Mar 28 


July 19 


Oct. 2 


Nov. 6 





The editors of the Navy Yard News chose the image above of First Ave. 
looking towards Gate 1 to capture the sense of peace and relief that people 
felt on V-J Day. The caption was "The Lonely Street." BOSTS-13352 



1M5 



unarlestown Navy Yard Historic Kesource btudy 




Many workers spent lengthy careers at the Navy Yard. Leadingman 
Ropemaker Frank B. "Barney" Christensen began work as a "boy" in the 
Ropewalkatage 16 in 1898. Fifty years later, on Mar. 31, 1948, Shipyard 
Commander Capt. Wesley McL. Hague honors his half century of service 
by designating him "Honorary Shipyard Commander" for the day. Looking 
on are Secretary of the Navy John L. Sullivan and First Naval District 
Commandant Rear Adm. Morton L. Deyo. BOSTS-13352 

1947 

Buildings 33 A, 205, 209, 2 1 1 A, and 2 1 1 C, and a portion of 
Building 2 1 5B demolished. 
— Buildings 1 9A, 27, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 7 1 , and 75 at the South 
Boston Annex demolished. 

Jan. U.S. Naval Storehouse, Hingham, Mass., became Hingham 

Storehouse Dept. of the Navy Yard; department was 
closed on Sept. 30, 1948. The facility then became the 
Naval Industrial Reserve Shipyard, under the jurisdiction 
of the Navy Yard. 

June 1 6 Commandant, 1 st Naval District, assumed collateral duty 
of Commander, Naval Base Boston. 

Oct. 31 Chelsea Annex declared surplus by the Navy and turned 
over to War Assets Administration for disposal. 

Nov. Operation of Shipyard Cafeteria transferred from conces- 
sionaire to Civilian Cafeteria Board. The Board became 
part of the Employee Cooperative Association in 1 957. 

1948 

Ammunition Bunker (Building 272) completed. 
Paint removed from brick walls of Marine Barracks (Quar- 
ters I). 

Apr. Radio Tower near Ropewalk at 6th St. demolished. 

Apr. I Headquarters, New England Division, Army Corps of En- 
gineers, moved into Building 21 at the South Boston An- 
nex. 

May Conversion of Laundry (Building 1 0) to Sonar Building, 
including construction of addition housing sonar test tank, 
completed. 

June 3 Revised pier and bulkhead line, defining waterside bound- 
ary of the yard, approved; revision added approximately 
7.35 acres to the Navy Yard. Jurisdiction over this area 
was ceded to the United States by the Massachusetts 
General Court by act of June 1, 1948. 

Summer Extension of Dry Dock 1 completed. 

July 8 Transducer Repair Facility for the East Coast established 
at the Navy Yard. 



Dec. 12 Lockwood's Basin declared surplus by the Navy and 
turned over to War Assets Administration for disposal. 

1949 

Buildings 2 1 1 A and 2 1 1 C demolished. 

Wooden Band Stand (Structure 260) built at base of Flag 

Pole on Shipyard Mall. 

June Reconstruction of outer portion of Dry Dock 2 completed. 

June 18 Rear Adm. R. Morgan Watt, Jr., assumed position of Ship- 
yard Commander. 

Dec. 28 Rehabilitation of Flag Pole (Structure 242) completed. 

1950 

Reconstruction of Foundry (Building 42C) completed; 
project incorporated former Flask Yard into structure. 

Feb. 27 In conjunction with the opening of the Mystic River Bridge 
(Mystic-Tobin Bridge), Gate 2 became one-way as an en- 
try to the yard and Gate 1 became one-way as an exit. 

Mar. 30 Naval Ammunition Depot Hingham placed in a mainte- 
nance status; officially closed in 1 961 . 

Apr. 1 Long Beach Naval Shipyard inactivated; reactivated on 
Jan. 4, 1951. 

June 25 North Korea invaded South Korea, marking start of Ko- 
rean War. 

Aug. Redevelopment of Hoosac Pier adjacent to Navy Yard 
completed. 

Aug. 25 Navy Yard began a three-day celebration of its Sesqui- 
centennial. This anniversary marked the first time the 
yard had commemorated its founding. 

Aug. 25 War Memorial dedicated. 

Nov. 27 New Chapel (Building 143) dedicated. 

Dec. 7 Capt. Pleasant D. Gold, Jr., assumed position of Shipyard 
Commander. 

1951 

Floating Crane YD-32 (YD-32). built from components from 
other cranes, christened. 

Porches on the upper floors of the Marine Barracks (Quar- 
ters I) enclosed. 
Apr. 27 Port of Boston Authority approved license for the con- 
struction of four Dolphins on boundary line between Navy 
Yard and Hoosac Pier. 



The 150th anniversary of the estab- 
lishment of the Navy Yard was the 
first time that the yard officially cel- 
ebrated the anniversary. A number of 
events were held, both within the yard 
and at venues such as the Hatch Shell 
on the Charles River Esplanade. Here, 
Shipyard Commander Capt. R. Mor- 
gan Watt, Jr., crowns Mary Connelly 
as Miss Sesquicentennial on Aug. 22, 
1950. BOSTS-7544 




1116 



Appendix A, Chronology 



"A.B.C.'s Of B.N.S.": AGallery 



AS A PART OF ITS CELEBRATION of the sesquicentennial of 
he Boston Naval Shipyard, the Boston Naval Shipyard News 
ran a series of cartoons by shipyard artist Patsy L. Napoli that pre- 
sented an illustrated capsule history of the yard under the title, 
"A.B.C.'s of B.N. S." The series ran, with gaps, between January 
1950 and May 1951. 

This gallery presents these cartoons in their original publica- 
tion order. The drawings contained in them were often based on 
historical prints and photographs in the yard's files. Many of those 
actual graphics appear elsewhere in this report. With a few excep- 
tions, largely relating to beliefs contained in internal yard histories 
disproven by later research (such as the claim that shiphouses origi- 
nated at the Navy Yard) the information is accurate. 



This photograph of artist Patsy L. 
Napoli, who began his career with 
the Boston Daily Advertiser in 
1 930 and came to the yard in Aug. 
1943, shows him at work on his 
comic strip The Yardbirds, a fea- 
ture that ran in the Shipyard News 
in the 1950s. 

Boston Naval Shipyard News, 
Mar. 23, 1956 




TKI ItlTON * * * * I 



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1117 - 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 

A.B.C.'s Of B.N.S. ": A Gallery 



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• v. 



- 1 1 If 



Appendix A, Chronology 



"A.B.C.'sOfB.N.S.'iAGallery 








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1119 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 

"A.B.C.'s Of B.N.S." : A Gallery 



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1120 



\ppendixA, Chronology 



"A.B.C.'s Of B.N.S." : A Gallery 




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1121 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Stud> 

"A.B.C.'s Of B.N.S.": A Gallery 




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- 1122 



Appendix A, Chronology 



A.B.C.'s Of B.N.S.": A Gallery 






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1123 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



One of the duties of the Shipyard Commander was the presentation of a 
variety of awards to employees. Here, in Feb. 1 954 Capt. Pleasant D. Gold, 
Jr. (1902-1965), presents Supervisory Planner & Estimator John H. Nolan 
with an award for a beneficial suggestion that saved the Navy $561 ,000. 
Looking on are Nolan's wife Helen (center) and daughters Phyllis (left) and 
Jean (right). BOSTS-7569 

June 4 Navy Yard started conversion of USS Picking (DD-685), 
lead ship in SCB-74A modernization program for Fletcher- 
class destroyers. 

June 25 Contract awarded for erection of Light Towers 238 to 240 
along west side of Dry Dock 2. 

Sept. 7 USS Cass in Young (DD-793) recommissioned at San Di- 
ego. Calif. 

Sept. 28 Congress authorized improvements to Power Plant (Build- 
ing 108). 

Oct. New Truck Scale (Structure 235) installed on First Ave. at 

Scale House (Building 19). 

Nov. 5 National Shawmut Bank opened in Building 32. 

1952 

Shed addition at north end of Building 1 completed; shed 
had formerly been independent temporary structure. 
New dewatering pumps installed at Dry Dock 5. 

Apr. 17 Congress authorized abandonment of Chelsea St. access 
to Building 204 in exchange for provision of substitute 
facilities by the Mystic River Bridge Authority. 

June 30 Employment reached post- World War II peak of 1 3,600. 

July 14 Congress authorized expansion of Electronics and Electri- 
cal Shop (Building 197). 

Aug. 26 Navy acquired parcel of land (0. 1 63 acres) between Build- 
ing 204 and Mystic River Bridge (Mystic-Tobin Bridge) 
from Mystic River Bridge Authority; land was required to 
allow construction of access to Building 204 following 
closure of Chelsea St. for the construction of the Central 
Artery connection to the Mystic River Bridge. 

Sept. 5 USS Cassin Young (DD-793) entered Navy Yard for SCB- 
74A modernization; completed on Jan. 6, 1 953. 



Mar. 2 



July 27 
Oct. 16 



Nov. 2 



1953 

Ferry service between Charlestown and the South Boston 

Annex instituted, using YFB-S1 (YFB-81 ), the former yacht 

Amada. 

Armistice ending Korean War signed. 

Five shipyard employees were among the 37 killed in an 

explosion and fire on board USS Leyte (CVS-32) which 

was undergoing conversion at the South Boston Annex. 

Eight longshoremen were killed in an explosion in the hold 

of MV Black Falcon at Berth F of the Boston Army Base. 



On Oct. 1 6, 1 953, at 3: 1 5 p.m., while under conversion to an antisubmarine 
warfare carrier alongside the West Jetty at the South Boston Annex, USS 
Leyte (CVS-32) suffered an explosion in her port catapult machinery room. 
After a hard fight by both yard and city firefighters, the fire was extin- 
guished at 7:57 p.m. As a result of the fire, 37 men died and 28 were 
injured. Here, in this Associated Press photograph clipped from the Chris- 
tian Science Monitor by the yard's public affairs staff, ambulances and 
other emergency vehicles are seen alongside the vessel. Interestingly, 
other than a list of the five shipyard employees killed, the yard's internal 
newspaper made no mention of the explosion. BOSTS-13344 




1954 

Additions to Buildings 1 08 and 1 97 completed. 

Chain Forge upgraded to permit production of larger chain 

(4 3 /4-inch) for Forrestal-c\ass aircraft carriers. 

Feb. 26 Rear Adm. Philip W. Snyder assumed position of Ship- 
yard Commander. 

July I Navy Yard started work to complete USS Wagner (DER- 
539) and USS Vandivier (DER-540), whose construction 
had been suspended at the end of World War II. as radar 
picket escorts (SCB-46A). 

July 6 Construction of addition to Building 120 for Dental De- 
partment begun by Arielli Construction Co.; completed in 
Jan. 1955. 

July 23 Legislation authorizing restoration of USS Constitution 
(IX-2I) and permanent berthing in Boston signed. 

July 27 Congress authorized repairs to and lease of portions of 
Boston Army Base to Port of Boston Commission. 

Aug. 31 Hurricane Carol caused extensive damage to buildings at 
both Charlestown and South Boston and nearly capsizes 
the escort carrier Nehenta Bay (CVE-74), berthed at the 
Naval Operating Base in East Boston. 

1955 

Quarters A and Building 202 demolished. 
"K." Street Annex declared surplus to shipyard needs. 
Jan. New aboveground Steam Distribution System at South 

Boston Annex completed. 




1124 



Appendix A, Chronology 



Shipyard Commanders: The Final 20 Years 




Rear Adm. Philip W. Snyder Rear Adm. William E. Howard, Jr. 

BOSTS-7325 BOSTS-7167 



Capt. Fred L. Ruhlman Rear Adm. William A. Brockett 

BOSTS-7306 BOSTS-7038 




RearAdm. Frank C. Jones 

BOSTS-7182 



RearAdm. Stuart C. Jones 

BOSTS-7184 



RearAdm. Robert C. Gooding 

BOSTS-9382 



RearAdm. Raymond W. Burk 

BOSTS-7042 




Capt. Russel L.Arthur 

BOSTS-7009 



June 27 

July 15 
Aug. 24 



Sept. 



Rear Adm. William E. Howard, Jr., assumed position of 
Shipyard Commander. 

Congress authorized replacement of Piers 4, 6, and 1 1 . 
Conversion of USS Gyatt (DD-7 1 2 ) to prototype guided- 
missile destroyer ( DDG-7 1 2, later DDG- 1 ) assigned to Navy 
Yard; completed on Mar. 8, 1 957. 

Curtain gates and new entrance and parking area for USS 
Constitution between Building 4 and Hoosac Stores com- 
pleted; designation 1 st St. replaced on yard maps by "Park- 
ing Area." 

1956 

Mar. 26 The Army entered into a lease with the Port of Boston 

Commission for use of portions of the Boston Army Base. 
fitly 23 Conversion of USS Providence (CL-82) to guided-missile 

cruiser (CLG-6) assigned to Navy Yard; completed on Dec. 

31,1959. 

Congress authorized replacement of Pier 7. 

USS Suffolk County (LST-1173) launched; last warship 

built by the Navy Yard. 



iug. 3 
Jept. 5 



Oct. 28 Production of die-lock chain in the Forge Shop featured in 
live broadcast of CBS-TV children's program Let s Take A 
Trip; broadcast not carried by local CBS affiliate. 

Dec. Reconstruction of Pier 1 1 to accommodate aircraft carriers 
completed; project included installation of portal crane 
tracks along new length of pier. 

1957 

Mar. 4 USS Constitution (IX-21 ) entered Drv Dock 1 for minor 
hull repairs. 

June 12 USS Cassin Young ( DD-793) entered Navy Yard for oxer- 
haul; completed on Sept. 12, 1957. 

Aug. Reconstruction of Piers 4 and 6 completed: portal crane 
tracks extended from Dry Dock 2 to connect with existing 
tracks on Pier 5 and new tracks on Piers 4 and 6. 

Nov. 26 Conversion of USS Albany (CA-123) to guided-missile 
cruiser (CG- 1 0) assigned to Navy Yard; completed on Nov. 
3,1962. 

Dec. 21 Boston Naval Shipyard Employee Cooperative Associa- 
tion established. 



1125 



THE CHARLESTO WN NAVY YARD was more than either a mili- 
tary installation or an industrial plant. It was a community, both 
for the naval personnel assigned to the yard and its civilian 
workforce. Whether in small groups within individual shops or as 
part of yardwide professional and social organizations, workers as- 
sociated with each other outside of their official duties. 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 

The Navy Yard Community : A Gallery 

This gallery provides images of employees — and their fami- 




One of the most active professional groups within the shipyard was the 
Master Mechanics & Foreman's Association. This group portrait was taken 
on Dec. 15, 1944. In the front row, left to right, are R.W. Buckmaster, 
Outside Machine; J. Hickey, Moldor [sic]; T. McQueeny, Dockmaster; R. 
Kneeland, Power House; C. Schofield, Shipfitter; C. Donahue, Electrician; 

E. Blyth, Plumber; T. Kaes, Ropemaker. In the second row, left to right, are 

F. Simon, Sheet Metal Worker; C. Duke, Painter; A. Leahy, Forge; A. Ander- 
son, Inside Machine; J. Potts, Public Works; T. Foulkes, Riggers; T. Murray, 
Woodworker; G. Ruby, Patternmaker; R. Dragone, Transportation; and F. 
Sullivan, Boilermaker. BOSTS-7418 

Sports were an important part of employee activities. This image shows 
the yard's 1906 baseball team. From left to right are Bernard O'Hayre, 
George Augherton, Larry Chase, Scott Whicher, Robert J. Murphy (back), 
Frank V. Manning, Frank Collins, Walter Murphy, and Harry J. Phelps. 

BOSTS-7415 




The community spirit of yard workers was exemplified by their participation 
in charitable campaigns. Here, Swedish starlet Marta Toren presents feath- 
ers to George C. Tegan and Francis Repetto for their contributions to the 
annual Red Feather Campaign (the local precursor to the United Fund) on 
Oct. 31,1950. BOSTS-7510 



Many social activities for yard employees involved their families. Here, 
children of Supply Dept. workers pose for a group picture during the 
department's Dec. 1 957 Christmas party. BOSTS-7499 



lies — sharing in extra-curricular activities. From its birth in the mid- 
1 930s, the shipyard's internal newspaper provided extensive cover- 
age of such events and promoted causes such as charitable giving 
and blood donation. 




Individual shops often had their own informal organizations which spon- 
sored social activities for their members. Here, the women of the Structural 
Shop attend an Easter party during World War II. BOSTS-7412 





M26 - 



Appendix A, Chronology 



The Boston Naval Shipyard News served 
the shipyard community, keeping employ- 
ees informed of major yard activities and 
official policies. Whether recognizing 
those rewarded for their extraordinary 
contributions or providing news of per- 
sonal accomplishments outside of the job, 
the vast majority of its stories, however, 
related to yard workers. The News also 
served as the primary means of promot- 
ing causes such as safety, charitable giv- 
ing, and blood donation. The Oct. 21, 
1 960, issue is typical in this respect. The 
lead story promotes a dance being held 
by the Recreation Association, while other 
articles note the kickoff of the annual 
United Fund campaign and the blood do- 
nation program as well as providing sta- 
tistics on disabling injuries. 

BOSTS-13352 



Shipyard employees also participated in 
events outside of the yard such as the 
annual Evacuation Day and Bunker Hill 
Day parades. Here the float for the 1 961 
Evacuation Day — better known as the St. 
Patrick's Day — parade prepares to leave 
Charlestown for South Boston. 

BOSTS-7632 



The Navy Yard Community: A Gallery 



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Tmt H« Oitt H-*» 



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niHDwHwn 111 




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1127 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 




Feb. 


13 


Mar. 


11 


Mar. 20 


Apr. 


I 


Aug. 


8 


Nov. 




Dec. 


30 



In the post-World War II era, the Navy Yard celebrated the Christmas holi- 
days with a series of special events aimed at the children of yard workers. 
Here, on Dec. 21 , 1 961 , Shipyard Commander Rear Adm. William A. Brockett 
and Cmdr. Donald V. Cox, commanding officer of the newly-commissioned 
USS Robison (DDG-1 2), pose on that vessel with Santa Claus, eighteen 
times over, before the 1 5th Annual Children's Christmas Parties held in each 
of the yard's shops. BOSTS-14107 

1958 

Erection of 50-ton Portal Cranes 24 and 25 by Star Iron & 
Steel Co. completed. 

Contract for construction of aboveground steam line on 
Pier 1 awarded to P.J. Riley & Co. 

Aportion (15.90 acres) of the "E" Street Annex declared 
excess to shipyard needs. 

U.S. Naval Receiving Station, Boston redesignated U.S. 
Naval Station, Boston. 

USS Cassin Young (DD-793 ) entered Navy Yard for over- 
haul; completed on Oct. 4, 1 958; work largely performed at 
South Boston Annex. 

Reconstructed Pier 7 dedicated; project included installa- 
tion of portal crane tracks connecting with those at Pier 6. 
GSA sold a portion of the"IC Street Annex to Boston 
Edison Co. for $185,000. 

1959 

Gate 1 Gate House (Building 267) completed; project in- 
cluded demolition of Main Gate (Building 97). 
Band Stand (Structure 260) rebuilt; project included mov- 
ing War Memorial to site in front of the Band Stand. 

Apr. 24 Navy Yard started FRAM I (SCB-206) conversion of USS 
Pem'(DD-844), lead ship in FRAM program for Gearing- 
class destroyers; completed on May 10, 1960. 

June 15 Capt. Fred L. Ruhlman assumed position of Shipyard Com- 
mander. 

Nov 20 Navy conducted first public "turnaround cruise" for USS 
Constitution (IX-21). 

1960 

Hammerhead Crane 6 and Gate 5 Gate Houses (Buildings 
243, 257) demolished. 

Feb. 29 East Boston Fuel Annex disestablished. 

Apr. 29 USS Cassin Young (DD-793) decommissioned at Norfolk 
Naval Shipyard; later transferred to Inactive Ship Mainte- 
nance Facility Philadelphia. 

May 27 Contract awarded for paint removal from brick surfaces of 
Buildings 4, 5. and 265 (Quarters B-C-D-E-F). 



July Remaining portion of the "K" Street Annex sold. 

July 6 Congress authorized exchange of portions of the "E" Street 
Annex for Massport lands occupied under permits by the 
Naval Station; actual exchange occurred in 1965. 

Aug. 15 A portion ( 1 8.65 acres) of the "E" Street Annex declared 
excess to shipyard needs. 

Sept. 15 Rear Adm. William A. Brockett assumed position of Ship- 
yard Commander. 

Sept. 30 Inactivation of industrial activities at South Boston An- 
nex, except for Dry Docks 3 and 4, completed. 

Dec. 19 USS Constitution (IX-21 ) designated as National Historic 
Landmark. 

1961 

Summer Reconstruction of Gate 4 pedestrian ramp completed. 
July 21 One of two Fargo Buildings (Building 37) (1.42 acres) at 

South Boston Annex sold. 
Sept. Boston Group, Atlantic Reserve Fleet, disestablished; 

group had been largest tenant at South Boston Annex. 
Oct. 5 New caisson for Dry Dock 2 delivered; built by Bromfield 

Corp., East Boston, Mass. 

1962 

Buildings 208, 218, and 219 as well as outer portion of 

Building 2 1 1 B demolished. 

Naval Ammunition Depot Hingham declared surplus by 

the Navy. 
Feb. Improvements to dewatering system for Dry Docks 1 and 

2 completed; work included new inlet in Dry Dock 1 and 

new pumps in Pump House (Building 123). 
June 29 Rear Adm. Frank C. Jones assumed position of Shipyard 

Commander. 
July 27 State legislation authorizing erection of Collimation Tower 

(Structure 1 10) on Pier 2 at South Boston approved. 

1963 

May 23 Tarring House (Building 60) placed in inactive status. 

May 28 West, North, East, and South Jetties at South Boston re- 
designated as Wharves 105-108. respectively. 

June Greenhouse addition at the south end of the Carriage 
House (Building 2 1 ) demolished. 

Dec. 3 USS Constitution (IX-2 1 ) entered Dry Dock 1 for hull re- 
pairs; undocked on Mar. 25. 1964. 

Dec. 7 Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara informed Presi- 
dent Lyndon B. Johnson of his opinion that the Navy 
Yard, along with those at New York. Philadelphia, and San 
Francisco, should be closed. 

1964 

Committee to Retain the Boston Naval Shipyard formed to 
oppose possible closure of the yard. 
South Lean-to of Building 16 and West Lean-to of Build- 
ing 2S at South Boston Annex demolished. 

Apr. 17 Secretary of Defense McNamara visited Navy Yard, rais- 
ing possibility of yard closure. 

June 1 Shed addition at north end of Building 10 demolished. 

June 10 Proposal to demolish Building 60 cancelled. 

. lug. 7 Gulf of Tonkin Resolution signed; legislation became au- 



1128 



Appendix A, Chronology 

"I Am An Artist": Allan Rohan Crite, Navy Yard Draftsman/Technical Illustrator 

ALLAN ROHAN CRITE was an artist since the age of six. His 
drawings, paintings, and prints reflect the world that surrounds 
him in any given moment; often this vision is infused with religious 
overtones. His work, which has been internationally acclaimed and 
exhibited at institutions such as the Museum of Modern Art in New 
York and the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, illustrates the 
miraculous and whimsical dignity of life's ordinary events. 

For over 30 years, Allan Rohan Crite worked at the Boston 
Naval Shipyard as a draftsman and technical illustrator. First hired 
in 1 941 , Crite carved out a unique place for himself working first as a 
draftsman, then eventually retiring as an illustrator. During this time 
Crite influenced how ships were designed and how urban life was 
recorded. As he himself said, "There wasn't much difference be- 
tween the work I was doing in the yard and the work I was doing 
outside. Because it was related." 

Though his work at the Navy Yard involved technical draw- 
ings, Crite always considered himself an artist. Born in 1910 and a 
nearly life-long resident of Boston, the artist's skills were evident 
early on when he studied in the 1 920s at the Children's Art Center in 
the South End of Boston. Later, Crite was one of the first African- 
American students at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, gradu- 
ating in 1936. 

In the 1930s he embarked on creating a series of images of 
urban life in Boston known as the "Neighborhood Series." Some of 
these works were created as part of the Works Progress Admin- 
istration's Federal Art Project (WPA/FAP), a New Deal program that 
employed artists during the Depression. His involvement with the 
WPA/FAP set the tone for his artistic work for years to come and 
represented the beginning of a long-term working relationship be- 
tween the artist and the federal government. 

As a draftsman in the Design Department of the Navy Yard, 
much of Crite's first work in the yard consisted of mechanical draw- 
ings of engineering, propulsion, and boiler systems. As Crite con- 




This photograph of Allan Rohan Crite working at his desk in the Design 
Division drafting room in Building 39 appeared in the Boston Naval Shipyard 
News of June 30, 1 952, in connection with an article highlighting the publi- 
cation of his book, Three Spirituals From Earth to Heaven. 

BOSTS-7100 



"Consultation in the Drafting Room" 
is one of a series of watercolors 
of shipyard scenes Crite did in 
1943. This image includes a self- 
portrait. Boston Athenaeum 









■ 



.-•■ 

■5' 



• 



I • - 








WW UMWBTm 




Although not as well-known as the work of the 
laborers who fabricated components and built 
and repaired ships, the work of the designers 
and draftsmen who produced the thousands of 
highly-detailed drawings required to build a mod- 
ern warship was a crucial element of shipyard 
operations. Allan Rohan Crite was one of many 
draftsmen employed to prepare accurate plans 
for the fabrication of components such as this 
6x5-in. bearing for the aft end of a high-pres- 
sure turbine for a group of G/ea\/es-class de- 
stroyers built at three different yards between 
1939 and 1941. By the time Crite prepared this 
drawing on May 10,1 944, four of the eight ves- 
sels to which it applied -USS Gwin (DD-433), 
USS Meredith (DD-434), USS Monssen (DD- 
436), and USS Ingraham (DD-444)— had been 
sunk due to enemy action or collisions. 

NARARG 19 Series 5730 



The text of this sidebar is based on exhibit and brochure texts developed 
by former Boston NHP Park Ranger Maryrose Grossman. 



I 129 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 
"I Am An Artist": Allan Rohan Crite, Navy Yard Draftsman/Technical Illustrator 



tinued working in the yard, his artistic talents were recognized. He 
advanced from drafting to three-dimensional perspective drawings 
as engineers would have him flesh out their designs. Such draw- 
ings afforded the opportunity for greater artistic freedom and cre- 
ativity on the job; as Crite later stated, "Straight drafting would 
drive me out of my mind!" It would, however, be a while before the 
title "Illustrator/Technical Equipment" caught up with the work that 
Crite had already been doing. 

In addition to official duties, Crite drew cartoons for shipyard 
campaigns and special events, which were frequently found in the 
Boston Naval Shipyard News from the 1950s to the 1970s. He 



i "I IMIJ 




In 1 958 Crite drew this cover for the yard 
history prepared by George O.Q. 
Mansfield. 



Crite's outside art often fea- 
tured religious themes. Here, 
that influence carries over to 
this drawing that graced the 
cover of the program for the 
retirement service for Chaplain 
Cmdr. Robert W. Odell held in 
the Navy Yard Chapel (Build- 
ing 143) on Nov. 30, 1972. 

ace. BOSTS-731 





! AMBITIO US ' 
■ J - V ,r,. 

An 








m^E\ 



Last day ^ ftAD/ 

Q A Q. 

DAY BY DAY GOOO-> 



_ 



This series of drawings was intended to emphasize both the proper han- 
dling of job orders and the application of common sense to their implemen- 
tation. Interestingly, Crite gave his tug the hull number of Red Cloud (YTB- 
268), a tug assigned not to Boston but to the San Francisco Bay area. 

BOSTS- 15980 



contributed to an ongoing "Keep Your Shipyard Clean" campaign 
and to the constant reminders to conserve materials and resources. 
Many of these works would combine references to seasons and 
holidays with the message emphasizing workers' responsibility. Crite 
also created personalized retirement portraits for his colleagues. 
Such activities were a respite from the rigors of drafting and techni- 
cal illustration. 

In the end, through his artistic ability, Allan Rohan Crite, who 
died at age 97 in September 2007, defined for himself a unique and 
innovative function in the yard. 




This drawing used double entendre 
and Crite's typical portrayal of the fe- 
male form to explain the functions of 
the Planning, Production, and Supply 
Departments. ace. BOSTS-809 



— "^""1 


rV 




i 

: 


XL* 



Conservation of utilities was one 
of the themes of Crite's work for 
the Boston Naval Shipyard News. 
This image dates to 1 973. 

ace. BOSTS-463 



L ■ 


i 


I 

> 


■ 4, _• ; 


V '■ . >-. V 




■ 








Most of Crite's "Keep Your Shipyard 
Clean" cartoons featured seasonal tie- 
ins and the yard's distinctive yellow 
trash receptacles. These cartoons 
date, clockwise from above, to July 
1972, Oct. 1973, and Dec. 1972. 

ace. BOSTS-463 



1 


*rK 1 


rf*L'«-' " \" ; 


' "■ 


'" s -n .^F^Z 

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1 




Still active into his nineties, Allan Rohan Crite is seen here with the special 
exhibit on his years at the Navy Yard which opened in the Navy Yard 
Visitor Center in 2003. Jackie Cox-Crite 



1130 



Appendix A, Chronology 




Shipyard operations were always hazardous, and yard photographers were called out to document major accidents. (Left) On the afternoon of Feb. 1 7, 
1 965, the boom of Portal Crane 67 collapsed during a load test, which had proceeded despite the crane operator's report that the crane was not operating 
properly. Fortunately, no one was injured in the accident, which took place on the North Jetty at the South Boston Annex. Note the salvage pontoons at 
left. (Right) Three and a half months later, on June 1 , 1 965, the boom of Portal Crane 21 collapsed. In that accident, which occurred on Pier 6, the driver 
of a passing truck was killed. Note floating crane YD-77 (YD-77) at right being used to lift the broken boom. BOSTS-1 3347 



thorization for increased United States involvement in Viet- 
nam War. 

Aug. 31 Ownership of Marine Barracks (Quarters I), Parade Ground, 
and Marine Corps Administration Building (Building 1 36) 
( 1 .35 acres) transferred from Navy to Marine Corps. 

Nov. 1 9 Defense Dept. announced plans to close New York Naval 
Shipyard in 1 966 and to phase out Portsmouth Naval Ship- 
yard over a ten-year period; accompanying study was 
highly critical of Charlestown Navy Yard. 
Other closures being ordered included Boston Army Base. 

Nov. 15 Penthouse addition on roof of Building 32 at South Bos- 
ton Annex demolished. 

Dec. 22 Conversion of USS Decatur (DD-936) to guided-missile 
destroyer (DDG-3 1 ) assigned to Navy Yard; completed on 
Apr. 29, 1967. 

1965 

Jan. Gatehouse at Gate 4 (Building 244) demolished. 

Feb. 6 Massachusetts Port Authority transferred two parcels of 

land (3.89 acres) used under permits as parking for the 

Naval Station to the Navy 
Apr. 23 FRAM I (SCB-206) conversion of USS Steinaker (DD- 

863) completed, marking end of Navy Yard involvement in 

FPvAM program. 
Apr. 23 Demolition of Buildings 19B and 19C at South Boston 

Annex completed. 
May 11 Mare Island Naval Shipyard and San Francisco (Hunters 

Point) Naval Shipyard administratively combined as San 

Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard; shipyards would resume 

independent status on Jan. 31,1 970. 
June 18 Covered lighter YFN-1226 (YFN-1226) launched. 
July? Covered lighter YFN- 122 7 (YFN- 1227) launched. 
July 7 Shipways 1 declared excess to shipyard needs. 
July 12 Surplus portions ( 15.9 acres) of the "I ."' Street Annex sold 

to the Massachusetts Port Authority. 



Aug. ? Covered lighter YFN- 1228 (YFN- 1228) launched. 

Sept. 10 Covered lighter YFN-1229 (YFN- 1 229) launched. 

Sept. 27 Navy Yard acquired Boston Defense Area Nike Battery 1 7 
Military Reservation at Nahant, Mass. (8.30 acres) for use 
as Ship Electronic Systems Evaluation Facility. 

Nov. 30 GSA sold surplus portions (25.99 acres) of the "E" Street 
Annex to the Massachusetts Port Authority. 

Dec. 8 Boston Army Base, adjacent to South Boston Annex, de- 
clared surplus by U.S. Army. 



1966 

Navy awarded contract to Kaiser Engineers to produce 
modernization plans for naval shipyards. 
Widening and repaving of Dock St. between Piers 8 and 
10 completed. 
June 25 New York (Brooklyn) Naval Shipyard disestablished. 



Mar. 



June 




In 1 964 the Navy decided to transfer ownership of the Marine Barracks 
and Parade Ground to the Marine Corps. A formal transfer ceremony took 
place in March 1965. Here Marine Barracks Commanding Officer Col. 
Thaddeus P. Wojcik (center) accepts the deed from yard Production Of- 
ficer and Acting Shipyard Commander Capt. T.T. McGillicuddy. Looking on 
are Public Works Officer Capt. Harry C. Rowe (left) and Barracks Execu- 
tive Officer Lt. Col. William S. Anthony (right). BOSTS-1 3352 



L131 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 
Navy Yard Open Houses: A Gallery 



THROUGHOUT THE POST-WORLD WAR II PERIOD, the Navy 
Yard held an open house on Armed Forces Day in May. At that time, 
various shops put on displays relating to their activities and ships 



were open to public visitation. These events were chronicled by 
special photo spreads in the yard's employee newspaper. This gal- 
lery presents several images from these events. 



31 



BOSTON NAVAL SHIPYARD 



WELCOMES YOU 



-- 





ARMED FORCES DAY 



This sign on the island south of First Ave. opposite the Flagpole welcomed 
visitors to the 1 950 event. BOSTS-7555 






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Sailors pass out guides to visitors arriving at Gate 1 for the May 1 966 open 
house. Note one of the yard's signature trash receptacles at right. 

BOSTS- 15829 



We/come to the Boston Naval Shipyard 
Armed Forces Day 'Open House" 



COUNTRY IS STRONGER MILITARILY THAN AT 
MY OTNER TIME II PEACETIME HISTORY 

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The shipyard provided guides for open house visitors. These contained 
greetings from the Shipyard Commander and maps to guide visitors to the 
exhibits in the yard. The circled numbers on the map for the 1965 event 
denote: (1 ) USS Constitution; (2) Electronics equipment; (3) U.S. Marine 
Corps weapons display; (4) Sheetmetal display; (5) Shipfitting and Welding 
display; (6) Rope exhibits and testing; (7) Material handling equipment; and 
(8) Power Plant. BOSTS-13344 




1 1 32 



Appendix A, Chronology 



Navy Yard Open Houses: A Gallery 











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"c*r5t J i*5 


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Ships were a popular attraction for open house visitors. Here visitors 
cross the Dry Dock 1 Caisson with USS Hawkins (DD-873) in the back- 
ground in May 1 960. Richard Leonhardt 




The open houses provided the yard with an opportunity to display some of 
its newest technology to the public. In 1 967 "Willie the Welder" operates a 
Spider Weldall, an automated welding machine. Note the Safety Shoe sign 
on the wall of Building 36 in the background. BOSTS-7553 




Spectators view a demonstration of ropemaking during the 1968 open 
house. BOSTS-7554 



Many shops built special displays for the open houses, 
control display dates to 1 968. 



This disaster 
BOSTS-7554 




rhe open houses included a number of special events showing off the 
special skills of yard employees. This demonstrations of scuba diving in 
Dry Dock 1 took place in 1 967. BOSTS-7553 



The Marine displays of weapons were popular with children. This view of 
a self-propelled gun was taken in May 1 966 in front of the wall to the east 
yard of the Marine Barracks. BOSTS-15829 



1 1 33 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



July 1 Capt. Stuart C.Jones assumed position of Shipyard Com- 
mander. 

Oct. 10 National Historic Preservation Act signed into law by Presi- 
dent Lyndon B. Johnson. 

Nov. 15 Boston Naval Shipyard designated as a National Historic 
Landmark. 

1967 

Apr. 26 Contract awarded to Traynor & Hansen Corp. of Long 
Island City, N. Y., for the transfer of former New York Naval 
Shipyard Portal Cranes 204 and 2 1 to Navy Yard for use 
at Dry Dock 5 and Pier 1 1 ; cranes delivered and erection 
began in Aug. 1967. 

June Modernization Study by Kaiser Engineers proposed con- 
solidation of all activities at South Boston; final report, 
with same recommendation, submitted in Mar. 1968. 

1968 

Shipways 1 and Shipways 2 converted into parking areas 
for shipyard employees. 

Feb. Extension of Machine Shop (Building 42-B) completed. 

Mar. I Naval Facilities Engineering Command approved the 
demolition of the Temporary Addition on Building 4. 

July Historical Plaque (Structure 276) installed. 

Aug. 30 Rear Adm. Robert C. Gooding assumed position of Ship- 
yard Commander. 

Nov. Secretary of Defense approved plan to consolidate ship- 
yard operations at South Boston. 

1969 

Oct. 9 Capt. Raymond W. Burk assumed position of Shipyard 
Commander. 

1970 

Mar. 4 Ship Electronic Systems Evaluation Facility (former Nike- 
Ajax Site) in Nahant declared excess to shipyard needs. 

July I Boston Army Base (57.60 acres), adjacent to South Bos- 
ton Annex, disestablished and transferred to Navy; trans- 
fer had been authorized in 1 968 as part of Navy Yard mod- 
ernization program. 

1971 

Aug. Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) issued 
Charlestown Navy Yard Re-Use Study; report was based 
on concept of shipyard consolidation at South Boston 
and proposed creation of national historic park and naval 
museum as part of yard redevelopment. 



Miss Fire Prevention of 1967, Esther 
Gardner, crowns her successor, 
Kathleen Usher, in July 1968. While 
regarded in 2008 as politically in- 
correct, the use of beauty contests 
to promote themes such as fire 
safety was common in the male- 
dominated shipyard of the 1950s 
and 1960s, BOSTS-13352 





The Navy Yard possessed unique capabilities which it provided on a reim- 
bursable basis to private industry. On Oct. 11, 1966, the yard's floating 
crane YD-796 was hired by the Wyman Gordon Co. of Worcester, Mass., 
to unload a 1 33-ton casting from the Dutch freighter MV Schiedyk onto a 
special railroad car. Here, the casting is being lifted from the deck of YD- 
796 at Pier 7. BOSTS-16197 



Nov. 15 Economic Development & Industrial Corp. of Boston 

(EDIC) established. 
Nov. 16 Rehabilitation of caisson for Dry Dock 5 began; completed 

on Apr. 5, 1972. 
Dec. National Park Service issued new area study for proposed 

Boston National Historic Sites that included a portion of 

the Navy Yard within the park. 

1972 

Observation deck constructed around Building 10 to al- 
low public viewing of USS Constitution during her dry 
docking scheduled for 1973. 

Jan. 25 Navy Yard declared Boston Arm) Base to be excess to its 
needs. 

Aug. 25 Capt. Russel L. Arthur assumed position of Shipyard Com- 
mander. 

Sept. 22 USS Constitution Museum Foundation organized. 

Nov. Navy Yard submitted new ten-year modernization plan for 
Charlestown; plan replaced earlier plan to move to South 
Boston. 






1 I 34 



Appendix A, Chronology 



Ship Transfer— FGNS Rommel (D-187): A Gallery 



IN THE POST- WORLD WAR II PERIOD the United States Navy 
began to furnish warships to the navies of friendly countries. 
Transfer ceremonies were a common event at the Charlestown Navy 
Yard from the early 1950s until closure of the yard. 

Most transfers were older American vessels, often overhauled 
and/or modernized by the shipyard prior to transfer. In some cases, 
however, the Navy contracted for the construction of new warships 
for foreign navies. Such was the case in March 1 965 when it ordered 



three Charles F. Adams-class guided missile destroyers (DDG-28 to 
DDG-30) for the Federal Republic of Germany from the Bath Iron 
Works. 

All three vessels, named for prominent German officers of World 
War II, were officially delivered to the Navy at Boston and trans- 
ferred to their recipient there. This gallery features views of the 
May 2, 1970, transfer of the last of the three ships, DDG-30, which 
became FGNS Rommel (D- 1 87). 




Tnw>«-«».G»niiii in n 1 - " '" 






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The event, the program for which was printed in both English and German, 
incorporated the transfer ceremony and the formal commissioning of the 
ship as a unit of the German Navy. BOSTS-1 5404 




-. , 



r t .jr-i - 



a ."TjnrnnnjisiSi^ 




The transfer, like most ship ceremonies, took place at Pier 1 East. These 
two images have been combined to show the tent which protected the 
invited guests and the ship's crew awaiting orders to man their ship. 

BOSTS-14122 






Shipyard Commander Capt. Raymond W. Burk looks on as German Under 
Secretary of Defense Johannes Birckholtz signs the formal certificate of 
delivery (above). BOSTS-14122 (left); BOSTS-1 5404 (above) 



1 135 - 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 
Ship Transfer— FGNS Rommel (D-l 87) : A Gallery 





Following the transfer, the German Navy formally commissioned the ship 
as FGNS Rommel. At left, a sailor stands at attention as the German 
National Anthem is played following the hoisting of the German naval en- 
sign. The program then continued with the setting of the watch and the 
manning of the ship by her crew (above). BOSTS-14122 



Among the distinguished guests at the ceremony was the ship's sponsor, 
Lucie Maria Rommel, the widow of the man for whom the vessel had been 
named, Field Marshal Erwin Rommel (1891-1944), the "Desert Fox" of the 
North African campaign in World War II. Here, she greets some of the 
younger guests present. BOSTS-14122 





|S Ry 


1 




mr 








I 








■In 




1 ~~ . ■ 




The transfer of Rommel to the German Navy did not end the vessel's 
association with the Charlestown Navy Yard. In late December 1970 the 
ship returned to Boston and entered Dry Dock 2 for work. Among the tasks 
performed was a repainting of her hull. This view taken on Jan. 1 3, 1 971 , 
shows the staging erected around the ship. BOSTS-14115 



136 



Appendix A, Chronology 



1973 

Paris Peace Accords signed ending United States involve- 
ment in Vietnam War. 

Department of Defense announced major base closure 
and realignment program. In addition to the Boston Naval 
Shipyard and the Chelsea Naval Hospital, closures in- 
cluded Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (San Francisco, Ca- 
lif.); Naval Air Station Imperial Beach (Calif); Naval Base 
and Naval Station Long Beach (Calif); Naval Base and 
Naval Station Key West (Fla.); Naval Air Station Albany 
(Ga.); Naval Air Station Glynco (Ga.); Naval Hospital and 
Naval Prison Portsmouth (Kittery, Me.); Naval Hospital 
St. Albans (N.Y.); Naval Air Station Quonset Point and 
Naval Hospital Quonset (R.I.); and Naval Base and Naval 
Station Newport (R.I.). 

USS Constitution ( IX-2 1 ) entered Dry Dock 1 for restora- 
tion; undocked on Apr. 26, 1974. 

U.S. Representative Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr., introduced bill 
(H.R. 8145) to direct the transfer of a portion of the 
Charlestown Navy Yard from the Navy to the Interior De- 
partment; Representative John Joseph Moakley intro- 
duced an identical bill (H.R. 8647) on June 1 3, 1 973. 
Army requested return of portion of Boston Army Base. 
Building 99 at South Boston Annex demolished. 
Piers 1,3,4, 7, 8, and 109 at South Boston Annex inacti- 
vated. 

Naval Hospital Boston Historic District (Chelsea Naval 
Hospital) placed on the National Register of Historic 
Places. 

Marine Railway and Dry Dock 5 inactivated. 
Transducer Repair Facility transferred to Portsmouth Na- 
val Shipyard. 

Inactivation of Grit Hopper 141 at South Boston Annex 
completed. 

Portsmouth Naval Shipyard requested transfer of eight 
portal cranes (20-24, 62-64) from the Navy Yard to Ports- 
mouth. 

U.S. Coast Guard expressed interest in potential of mov- 
ing its base from the North End to the South Boston An- 
nex; the proposal is ultimately abandoned in July 1 975. 
Inactivation of Dry Dock 3 at South Boston Annex began. 
Building 57 at South Boston Annex demolished. 
Boston Shipbuilding Corp. formed by a consortium of lo- 
cal shipbuilding companies with the intent of negotiating 
with the City of Boston for reuse of both the Charlestown 
Navy Yard and South Boston Annex for ship repair. 
Forge Shop completed final project, anchor chain for USS 
Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVAN-69). 
Modernization of USS Talbot (DEG-4) completed; ship 
was last industrial customer of Navy Yard. 

1974 

Inactivation of Dry Dock 4 at South Boston Annex began. 
Lunchstand adjacent to east side of Building 24 demol- 
ished. 

Inactivation of Buildings 23, 48, 56, 89, 93, and 1 04 at South 
Boston Annex completed. 




Employees of the Forge Shop pose with the anchor chain for USS Dwight 
D. Eisenhower (CVAN-69) on July 16, 1973. This was the last of some 4 
million feet of die-lock chain manufactured by the yard. From left to right are 
Moses Henderson, Joseph F Troisi, Gerald H. Ogonosky, Harold Hamilton 
(rear), Chapin Joseph, Thomas Hickey, Paul D. Godding (rear), Mark E. 
Taylor, William T Daly, Alfred A. Hannoosh, and Forge Shop Master Kenneth 
J.Mitchell. BOSTS-16105 



Jan. 16 Building 22 at South Boston Annex inactivated. 

Jan. 17 Building 19 and Scales 234 and 235 inactivated. 

Jan. 29 U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy and U.S. Representa- 
tives Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr., and John Joseph Moakley 
introduced bills (S.29 1 5; H.R. 12359) to establish the Bos- 
ton Naval Shipyard National Historic Site. 

Jan. 30 Inactivation of Buildings 228, 230, 233, and 271 completed. 
Inactivation of Building 103 as well as Piers 5 and 6 at 
South Boston Annex completed. 

Feb. 5 Inactivation of Band Stand (Structure 260) completed. 

Feb. 6 Inactivation of Building 1 27 completed. 

Inactivation of Building 54 at South Boston Annex com- 
pleted. 

Feb. 8 Inactivation of Pier 4 completed. 

Feb. 12 Inactivation of Building 39 and all of Building 24 except 
for a portion being used by security personnel at South 
Boston Annex completed. 

Feb. 13 Inactivation of Grit Hopper 1 1 1 at South Boston Annex 
completed. 

Feb. 14 Inactivation of Dry Dock 5 and Piers 8, 9, and 10 com- 
pleted. 
Pier 10 at South Boston Annex inactivated. 

Feb. 20 Inactivation of Building 62 completed. 

Feb. 25 New consolidated USS Constitution Maintenance & Re- 
pair Facility in Building 24 opened. 

Feb. 28 Shipyard Branch of National Shawmut Bank (located in 
Building 32) closed. 

Mar. 5 Inactivation of Building 1 1 completed. 

Mar. II Inactivation of Ammunition Bunker 272 completed. 

Mar. 15 Final issue of Boston Naval Shipyard News published; 
featured a historical review of the yard. 

Mar. 1 9 City of Boston Interim Reuse Plan for the Navy Yard envi- 
sioned continued shipbuilding activity at both 



1 137 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 




m W f Jtf **A • mm 



1 800 •*• Boston 



NavaJ Shipyard »*»197 \ 






mm t . *m rt tm t w fcy — ■***!■" ? 










'sr^jttL 







The final issue of the Boston Naval Shipyard News provided a history of 
the shipyard. BOSTS-13352 



Apr. 2 
Apr. 5 
Apr. 25 



Apr. 29 
May 1 

May 6 



May 10 



May 17 
May 27 



May 30 
May 31 



June 



Charlestown and South Boston, as well as a national his- 
toric park at Charlestown. 
Inactivation of Building 206 completed. 
Inactivation of Building 21 completed. 
Inactivation of Building 1 78 completed. 
Inactivation of Building 17 at South Boston Annex com- 
pleted. 

Inactivation of Buildings 225, 227, and 232 completed. 
Boston Caretaker Group, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, es- 
tablished with Capt. William J. Norris as Director. 
Inactivation of Building 104 completed. 
With the exception of the Fire Station, inactivation of Build- 
ing 29 at South Boston Annex completed. 
Inactivation of Building 103 completed. 
Inactivation of Buildings 46 and 79 at South Boston An- 
nex completed. 

Inactivation of Building 277 completed. 
Inactivation of Buildings 30. 31. and 94. as well as all of 
Building 1 X with the exception of an electrical substation. 
ai South Boston Annex completed. 
Inactivation of Buildings 143 and 210 completed. 
With the exception of storage space assigned to USS 
Constitution (IX-21) and an electrical substation, inacti- 
vation of Building 1 98 completed. 

Inactivation of Buildings 15 and 15A at South Boston 
Annex completed. 



June 30 San Francisco (Hunters Point) Naval Shipyard dises- 
tablished. 

July Gasoline Station (Building 194) demolished. 

July 1 Boston Naval Shipyard formally disestablished; shipyard 
property and remaining activities transferred to Boston 
Caretaker Group, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. 

July 8 Inactivation of Shipways 2 completed. 

City of Boston formally expressed interest in purchasing 
the Navy Yard (Charlestown and South Boston) for con- 
tinued shipbuilding operations. 

Sept. 3 Inactivation of Quarters P completed. 

Sept. 5 Inactivation of Building 125 completed. 

Oct. 1 Boston National Historical Park Act of 1 974 signed; legis- 
lation included a portion of the yard, designated 
Charlestown Navy Yard and including USS Constitution, 
as part of new Boston National Historical Park. 

Oct. 15 Inactivation of Building 32 completed. 

Nov. Negotiations between the City of Boston and the Boston 
Shipbuilding Corp. broke down; as a result, the BRA de- 
cided not to pursue reuse of the Charlestown Navy Yard 
for industrial activities. 

Dec. 1 USS Cassin Young (DD-793) stricken from Naval Vessel 
Register. 

1975 

Portion of former Boston Army Base (13.3 acres) trans- 
ferred from the Navy to the Army. 
Commodore Isaac Hull Memorial. Inc., incorporated for 
the purpose of establishing a naval memorial at Derby, Ct.. 
featuring USS Cassin Young (DD-793). 
USS Constitution (IX-21 ) reopened to the public follow - 
ing completion of major portion of restoration project. 
City of Boston Reuse Plan for the Charlestown Navy Yard 
identified a mixed use, including light industry, for the 
property. 

Legislation creating Government Land Bank to acquire 
former military bases from the federal government signed. 
Hugh D. Gumey assumed position of Superintendent of 
Boston National Historical Park. 

John B. Calarese assumed position of Director. Boston 
Caretaker Group, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. 
Inactivation of Building 28 completed. 
BRA proposed location of the John F. Kennedy Library 
and Museum at the Navy Yard; initial proposal for use of 
Building 24 later changed to Building 36. 
Portion of former Boston Army Base (8.7 acres) trans- 
ferred from the Navy to the Arm\ . 
EDIC adopted name Boston Marine Industrial Park for its 
operations ai the South Boston Annex. 
EDIC took over South Boston Annex under lease from 
General Sen ices Administration (GSA). 
BRA submitted formal application for the transfer of the 
19.6 acres of the Charlestown Navy Yard to the city for 
development as a public park. 
Nov. 25 \ I >K entered into one year lease with Braswell Shipyards 
for l)r\ Dock 4 at the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 



Jan. 


19 


Jan. 


31 


Mar. 


14 


Apr. 


30 


May 


15 


May 


25 


June 


1 


June 15 
June 20 


July 


I 


Oct. 


16 


Nov. 


1 


Now 


17 






138 



Appendix A, Chronology 




Rear Adm. Samuel Eliot Morison cuts a rope with a sword to open the USS 
Constitution Museum on Apr. 4, 1976. Looking on are Charles Francis 
Adams and two Charlestown schoolchildren. NHC NH-85193 

1976 

National Park Service assumed control of Charlestown 
Navy Yard unit of Boston National Historical Park. 
Building 28 and the surrounding area (2.18 acres) at the 
South Boston Annex transferred from the Navy to the 
Army for use as an Army Reserve training center. 
Massachusetts Governor Michael S. Dukakis accepted 
the retrocession by the Navy of legislative jurisdiction 
over the former Boston Naval Shipyard and Chelsea Na- 
val Hospital properties; the federal government retained 
concurrent jurisdiction over the Charlestown Navy Yard 
unit of Boston National Historical Park. 
USS Constitution Museum opened in Building 22 by Rear 
Adm. Samuel Eliot Morison. 

Installation of chain-link fence separating Navy Yard unit 
of Boston NHP from the remainder of the yard completed. 
Power Plant (Building 1 08) ceased operation. 
Dry Dock 2 flooded; caisson approved for transfer to 
Portsmouth Naval Shipyard on June 28, 1976. 
Boston Caretaker Group, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, dis- 
established. 

Charlestown Navy Yard unit of Boston NHP (24.72 acres) 
formally transferred from GSA to the NPS. 
ED1C Economic Development Plan for Boston Marine In- 
dustrial Park at the South Boston Annex approved. 
HMY Britannia docked at Navy Yard; Queen Elizabeth II 
visited USS Constitution, Old State House, and Old North 
Church. 

Dry Dock 3 opened as a public facility available for lease 
to individual ship repair companies. 
State of Massachusetts transferred its reversionary rights 
in the South Boston Annex to the Government Land Bank. 
Mass. Executive Office of Environmental Affairs approved 
the initial BRA Environmental Impact Report on the pro- 
posed mixed-use redevelopment of the Navy Yard. 
Extensive damage occured to Buildings 39, 40, 103, 104, 
and 105, as well as the Shipways structure, when MDG 
Contractors used dynamite to demolish one of the yard's 
remaining hammerhead cranes. 



As part of the American Revolution 
Bicentennial celebrations, Queen 
Elizabeth II of Great Britain visited 
Boston on July 11, 1976. Here, she 
leaves USS Constitution during her 
stay in the Navy Yard. BNHP 




1977 
Efforts to bring USS Cassin Young (DD-793) to Connecti- 
cut as a museum ship came to an end. 

Feb. 7 BRA appointed Immobiliare New England as the devel- 
oper for the New Development Area of the Navy Yard; 
formal designation occurred on Mar. 23, 1978. 

May 6 Recreation Parcel (Shipyard Park) ( 1 6.37 acres) transferred 
from Bureau of Outdoor Recreation to the BRA; deed was 
modified by deed of May 15, 1979. 

June EDIC opened Industrial Job Training Center in Building 
49 at the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 

June 14 South Boston Annex (166.25 acres) sold to Government 
Land Bank by GSA for $4.7 million; Land Bank reconveyed 
property to EDIC the same day. 

Aug. Massachusetts College of Art issued feasibity study pro- 
posing that it move to Building 1 49 of the Navy Yard; plan 
is ultimately abandoned. 

Sept. 19 Portsmouth Naval Shipyard transferred Portal Crane 62 to 
Boston National Historical Park. 

Oct. BRA established site office in Building 32 of the Navy 

Yard. 

Oct. 11 Don Giannangelo Contractors began installation of new 
telephone conduit system within the Navy Yard unit of 
Boston NHP; completed on May 11,1 978. 

Oct. 19 NPS and BRA signed Memorandum of Agreement gov- 
erning Gate 4/5th St. access planning. Agreement also 
committed the BRA to pursuing transfer of Ropewalk 
(Building 58) and Chain Forge (Building 1 05) to the NPS. 

Nov. Dry Dock 1 , along with Dry Dock 1 at Norfolk Naval Ship- 
yard, designated as National Civil Engineering Landmarks 
by American Society of Civil Engineers ( ASCE). 

1978 

Jan. Building 38 severely damaged by fire. 

Jan. 18 EDIC entered into three-year lease with Marlyn Utilities 
for Buildings 20 and 40 and the utility system al the Bos- 
ton Marine Industrial Park. 

Feb. 19 Final BRA Environmental Impact Report on Navy Yard 
redevelopment approved by state. 
Draft EDIC I n\ ironmental impact Report on Boston Ma- 
rine Industrial Park developmenl approved by state, 

Apr. City of Boston received S2.48 million grant from U.S. Dept. 

of Housing & Urban Development for Navy Yard site im- 
provements and Shipyard Park construction. 



1139 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



ONE OF THE MAJOR STEPS in the disposition of the Navy 
Yard was the establishment of its value, since federal law re- 
quired that it be sold at market value. In late 1 974 the City of Boston 
retained Robert J. McCarthy of the real estate firm William H. Dolben 
& Sons to prepare an appraisal of the Navy Yard. 



Valuing The Navy Yard: A Gallery 

The report issued in March 1 975 placed a value of $4.4 million 
on the area outside of the national park. It included color images of 
the yard taken in December 1974 or January 1 975, many of which 
showed Boston Caretaker Group employees at work removing items 
from buildings. This gallery presents these images. 




Buildings 31 &120 
Forklifts were used to move furniture and other items out of individual 
buildings to central collection points. (All) NPC TIC 457/D6342 




Buildings 33, 38, 39 & 34 
Looking east on Second Ave., this view shows Buildings 33 and 38 on the 
north side, the Building 39 addition over the street, and Building 34 on the 
south side. 



Building 33 
This view north on 7th St. shows the extension of Building 33 which 
spanned the roadway and connected it to Building 38. 





Building 36 
Note that even at this late date, with few employees left on the Navy 
payroll, there was still business for newspaper vending machines. 



Buildings 39 & 105 
Note how First Ave. narrowed in front of the Chain Forge and the street 
lights and fire escapes on the front of Building 39. 



Building 42 
This view shows the 8th St. side of Building 42. Building 1 96 can be seen 
at right. Note the portal crane tracks in the foreground. 




1140 - 



Appendix A, Chronology 



Valuing The Navy Yard: A Gallery 




Buildings 58, 60 & 62 
The three buildings which make up the Ropewalk Complex are seen here. 
While the granite structures have been preserved, the overhead connec- 
tors between the Ropewalk and Building 79 (above) and between the 
Hemp House and Building 1 99 (right) would be demolished by the BRA. The 
paint on the Tarring House wall (above right) is evidence of the connector 
between the Hemp House and Ropewalk removed by the Navy in 1 973. 





Building 75 
The last of the yard's 1 9th-century Timber Sheds, Building 75 consisted of 
numerous doorways between granite pillars. Directly abutting the struc- 
ture at right is Building 1 87. 





Building 96 
The Motion Picture Exchange (Building 207) is seen to the left of the Forklift 
Repair Shop, while Building 79 is at right 



Buildings 103, 192 &192A 
The view looks north along the 9th St. side of Building 1 03. The varying 
architectural styles clearly indicate that the Electrical Substation (Building 
192/192A) had been added to at different points in time. 

Building 1 04, Hammerhead Cranes 2 & 4 & Shipways 1 & 2 
The Structural Shop can be seen in the background of this view looking 
northeast from Dock St. Note the yellow railings on the bridges across the 
Shipways. Portal Crane 19 is at left at the inner end of Pier 7. Building 192/ 
1 92A is at left, while Building 224 is just to the left of Portal Crane 1 9. 




^TT 






H4I 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 
Valuing The Navy Yard: A Gallery 




Building 106 
Building 1 06 was the least altered of the three buildings which comprised 
the early 20th-century Construction & Repair shop complex. Portal Crane 
2 1 can be seen in the distance on Pier 11 . 



Buildings 1 07 & 108 
This view of the Public Works Shop and the Central Power Plant looks west 
on Third Ave. 




Building 1 08, Cooling Tower 264, Ash Silo 268 
The various appendages and chimneys of the Central Power Plant are 
clearly visible in this view looking west. Two appendages, the Cooling 
Tower (center) and Ash Silo (in front of chimney), had their own structure 
numbers. Note the ornamental street light on the corner of Building 62 at 
left. 



Building 120 
This view of the east side of Building 1 20 shows the Dental Clinic addition 
which would be demolished by the BRA. At right is the Industrial Relations 
Office addition on top of the Ropewalk (Building 58) and the garages for the 
Navy Yard's ambulances. 




Buildings 1 23 & 197 
The Dry Dock Pump House was the only circular building in the Navy Yard, 
while the Electronics Shop was one of only three high-rise structures. 



Building 131 

Overhead utility lines were a feature of the Navy Yard. The Oil Storehouse 
was one of the larger buildings constructed in the yard by the WPA in the 
1930s. 



1142 



Appendix A, Chronology 



Valuing The Navy Yard: A Gallery 




Buildings 1 95 & 271 
Building 271 , the Paint Spray Booth, and several steel sheds lined the Dry 
Building 149 Dock 2 side of what was simply termed an Industrial Building (Building 195) 

The edge of Building 1 08 can be seen at left and Building 1 50 at right in this in the yard's property records. Shipyard Park now occupies this site, 
view of the west end of the General Storehouse 




Building 197 
For the most part, the Navy attempted to match architectural details when 
it added to buildings in peacetime. Thus, only slight differences in brick 
color distinguish between the original Building 1 97 and the 1 950s' addition 
on its west side. 



Building 199 

The second of the yard's General Storehouses was connected to the 
Hemp House (Building 62) by the overhead conveyor at right. The small 
brick structure along the 5th Ave. side is Building 77, the garages for the 
Lower Officers Quarters. Note the safety sign and, in the distance, Build- 
ing 114. 




Building 200 
The presence of cars in front of the Public Works Administration Building 
indicates that it was still occupied. Note the civilian yard policeman carry- 
ing a waste backet. By this time, the yard's Fire Department had already 
been disbanded. 



Building 206 
Building 206 provided locker room space for workers at the east end of the 
yard. Building 1 31 is at left. Note the stair/elevator tower at the head of Dry 
Dock 5 in the foreground and Portal Crane 21 on Pier 1 1 . The chimney of 
the Incinerator (Building 203) can be seen above Building 206. 



- 1 143 - 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 




Boston NHP Superintendent Hugh D. Gurney (in uniform, second from right) 
accepts a plaque from the American Society of Civil Engineers designating 
Dry Dock 1 as a National Civil Engineering Landmark on Apr. 1 0, 1 978. 

BNHP 

Apr. 10 Plaque designating Dry Dock 1 as an ASCE National Civil 
Engineering Landmark dedicated. 

June 8 EDIC sued the United States seeking to obtain the portion 
of the South Boston Annex (2.18 acres) retained as an 
Army Reserve Center under the reversion clause of the 
original state conveyance of the property to the Navy. 
USS Cassin Young (DD-793) transferred on loan to NPS 
for use as a museum ship at the Navy Yard. 

July BRA issued demolition and site clearance contract cover- 
ing demolition of Buildings 77, 143, 187, 191, 191 A, 192, 
1 92A, 200, 207, and 2 1 7 as well as various additions and 
exterior accretions on other buildings (3 1 , 33, 38, 39, 58, 
120) within Historic Monument Area. 

July The BRA held a formal groundbreaking for the redevelop- 
ment of the Navy Yard. Representative Thomas P. "Tip" 
O'Neill was the featured participant. 

July 7 Historic Monument Area (30.85 acres) transferred from 
GSAtotheBRA. 

July 22 State legislation terminating all state rights, title, and in- 
terest in Navy Yard property upon its transfer to the BRA 
approved. 

Aug. Former Environmental Protection Agency (ex-Navy) cov- 
ered barge entered Dry Dock 1 for conversion into boat 
landing stage at end of Pier 1 to enable harbor tour boats 
to dock at the Navy Yard; undocked in Nov. 1978. 
Portal Crane 62 returned to Navy Yard from Portsmouth 
Naval Shipyard. 

NPS awarded contract for installation of new 1 3.8kv elec- 
trical system from Chelsea St. to the Building 22 Substa- 
tion; work was completed on Feb. 1 , 1 979. 
Permit issued for use of Pier 3 Marginal Wharf by Massa- 
chusetts Environmental Police. 

National Parks and Recreation Act of 1 978 signed; legisla- 
tion added Building 1 07 to Charlestown Navy Yard unit of 
Boston National Historical Park and authorized granting 
of right-of-way easements for Chelsea-Water Sts. Con- 
nector and Gate 4/5th St. highway projects. 

Dec. 7 BRA entered into land disposition agreement with Im- 
mobiliare New England whereby it would lend the BRA 
funds for purchase of the New Development Area; actual 



Aug. 


29 


Sept. 


23 


Oct. 


19 


Nov. 


10 



Mar. 13 


Apr. 


Apr. 


Apr. 2 



transfer of property from the BRA to the developer would 
be on an "as needed" basis. Amendments to this agree- 
ment would be signed on July 1 2, 1 984, and June 25, 1 987. 

1979 

Buildings 136 and 198 demolished. 

Jan. EDIC received $1.59 million grant for renovations to Build- 

ings 1 8, 32, and 53, as well as Dry Dock 3, at the Boston 
Marine Industrial Park. 

Mar. 12 Portal Crane 63 returned to Portsmouth Naval Shipyard; 
crane had been on loan to the National Park Service since 
the spring of 1978. 

EDIC entered into three-year lease with PX Engineering 
for Building 16 at the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 
Conversion of Building 28 for North Atlantic Historic Pres- 
ervation Center completed. 

BRA began utility reconstruction in the Navy Yard. 
NPS and BRA signed an Agreement to Exchange Real 
Property, covering right-of-way easements for Chelsea- 
Water Sts. and Gate 4/5th St. highway projects and trans- 
fer of Building 107 to NPS; agreement authorized immedi- 
ate NPS access to Building 107 and temporary access to 
BRA parcels in the Navy Yard through NPS property. 

May 10 EDIC and Massport signed memorandum of agreement 
on future development of former South Boston Annex 
and Boston Army Base. 

May 21 Project Parcel (New Development Area) (58.4 acres) sold 
by GSA to the BRA for $ 1 .74 million. 

May 24 Building 42 (Parcel 2A 1 ) conveyed to Building 42 Associ- 
ates by the BRA. 

Massport relinquished all right, title, and interest in the 
Charlestown Navy Yard to the BRA. 
Massport relinquished all right, title, and interest in the 
former South Boston Annex to the EDIC. 

June Immobiliare began redevelopment of Building 42 and demo- 
lition of buildings within the New Development Area not 
mandated for retention (Buildings 127, 196). 

Oct. USS ( 'assin Young ( DD-7^3 ) entered Dry Dock 1 for resto- 

ration; undocked in May 1981. 

Nov. 27 EDIC entered into 90-year lease, effecti\ e Feb. 21.1 980, 
with Massport for 47 acres (37 submerged) on the North 
Jetty and Piers 1-4 at the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 
Massport entered into 53.5-year sublease, effective Mar. 
1 0, 1 980. with the EDIC for Buildings 1 1 7 and 1 1 8 at the 
former Boston Arnn Base. 

1980 

Shipyard Park Phase I completed; park was not formally 

opened until June 1 983. 
— Braswell Shipyards, which had leased Dry Dock 4 at the 

Boston Marine Industrial Park since 1 976, closed. 
Mar. 5 Amendment to EDIC Economic Development Plan for 

Boston Marine Industrial Park to incorporate former Army 

Base property approved. 
Mar. 17 Rehabilitation of Pier 1 bulkhead, Finger Pier, and Auxil- 
iary Pier (Pier 3) begun; work was completed on July 23, 

1981. 



1144 



Appendix A, Chronology 



EDIC entered into 20-year lease (with two ten-year exten- 
sion options) with O'Connell Seafood Co. for Pier 7/Wharf 
8 at the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 
EDIC and Massport received license from the state to fill 
in the area between the West Jetty and Pier 4 of the Bos- 
ton Marine Industrial Park. 

Demolition of Building 204 began; NPS maintenance shop 
functions transferred to Building 1 07. 
Building 245 moved from northwest corner of Navy Yard 
to its original location adjacent to Second Ave. 
Legislation signed adding Ropewalk (Building 58), Tar 
House (Building 60), and Chain Forge (Building 105) to 
Boston National Historical Park. 

NPS awarded a contract for installation of new 1 3.8kv elec- 
trical system in the Navy Yard unit of Boston NHP; work 
was completed in 1982. 

General Management Plan (GMP) for Charlestown Navy 
Yard unit of Boston National Historical Park approved. 
Guided missile frigate USS Samuel Eliot Morison (FFG- 
13) commissioned at Pier 1 West. 

Work on roadway reconstruction in the BRA portion of 
the yard, including 5th St., began. 

1981 

EDIC entered into ten-year lease (with a five-year exten- 
sion option) with General Ship Corp. for Piers 5 and 6 and 
Dry Dock 4 at the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 
NPS leased Building 32 to the Boston Marine Society. 
NPS awarded ownership of Hoosac Stores (0.61 acres) 
adjoining Charlestown Navy Yard following successful 
eminent domain proceedings. 

The former Naval Support Activity (15.58 acres), the re- 
maining portion of the "E" Street Annex, sold to the Mas- 
sachusetts Port Authority for S 1 .4 million. 
Contract for moving Navy Yard Boundary Wall along 
Chelsea St. west of Building 21 awarded to Alar Corp. The 
work, which was necessary to accommodate Chelsea- Wa- 
ter Sts. highway project, was completed in Apr. 1982. 
USS Cassin Young (DD-793) opened to the public as a 
museum ship. 

NPS awarded contract for rehabilitation of Scale House 
(Building 19); work completed in early 1982. 
BRA awarded contract for Shipyard Park Phase II (Pier 4); 
project, including Town Dock public landing facility, was 
completed in 1983. 

Nov. BRA designated Incubator Associates as tentative devel- 
oper of Building 36 and First Charlestown Development 
Corp. as developer of Buildings 33, 34, 38, and 39. 

Nov. 9 EDIC terminated lease with O'Connell Seafood for Pier II 
Wharf 8 at the Boston Marine Industrial Park for default 
and entered into 20-year lease (u ith two ten-year exten- 
sion options) with VII Corp. for the same property. 

1982 

East Extension of Building 104 demolished. 
Restoration of Muster House (Building 3 1 ) completed. 
Mar. 24 Pier 6 (Parcel 1 B 1 , 2B, 2B 1 ) conveyed to Shipyard Marina 




The rehabilitated destroyer USS Cassin Young (DD-793) opened to the 
public as a museum ship in a ceremony held at her berth at Pier 1 East on 
June 27, 1981. Taking place at the traditional location of Navy ship 
commissionings, the program followed much the same format. BNHP 

Trust and Parcels 2C, 3D sold to Shipyard Quarters Trust 
by the BRA. 
Mar. 26 EDIC entered into 20-year lease (with a ten-year extension 
option) with Park Realty Trust for Building 1 4 at the Bos- 
ton Marine Industrial Park; property subleased to Matt J. 
McDonald Co. 

Constitution Quarters (Building 42) conversion completed. 
Shipyard Quarters Marina at Pier 6 completed. 
Utility reconstruction completed in BRA portions of Navy 
Yard. 

EDIC entered into 20-year lease (with two five-year exten- 
sion options) with John J. Daly Inc. for Building 1 8 at the 
Boston Marine Industrial Park. 

EDIC entered into 20-year lease (with two ten-year exten- 
sion options) with Purolator Courier Corp. for Parcel D at 
the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 
EDIC entered into 1 5-year lease (with two five-year exten- 
sion options), effective Oct. 1 . 1 982, with Au Bon Pain for 
Building 29 at the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 



June 
June 
July 

July 15 



Oct. 12 



Dec. 14 



1983 

Jan. 13 Conversion of second floor of Marine Barracks into dor- 
mitory-style housing for NPS seasonal employees ap- 
proved by NPS North Atlantic Regional Office. 

Mar. 31 The city submitted a formal proposal to establish a Navy 
homeport at the former Boston Army Base. 

July 13 EDIC entered into 20-year lease ( with two five-year exten- 
sion options) with Stavis Seafoods for Building 1 7 at the 
Boston Marine Industrial Park. 

July 19 EDIC purchased 23.67 acres of the Boston Army Base, 
including Building I 14. from (ISA for $3.5 million. 

July 28 Navy decided against establishing a homeport in Boston. 

Sept. 15 EDIC entered into 50-year lease (u ith 25 one-year exten- 
sion options) with DLJ-Hoftman Inc. for Sections B. c . 
and D of Building 1 14 at the former Boston Arm) Base; 
lease was later transferred to Boston Harbor Partners. 

Oct. Gate 4/5th St. opened to traffic. 

Dec. BRA designated Congress Group, Inc. as developer of 
Buildings 149 and 199. 



1145 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 




In the early 1 980s, the New England Historic Seaport constructed the sail 
training schooner Spirit of Massachusetts alongside Dry Dock 2. Here, the 
vessel is lowered into the dock by a floating crane during her launching on 
Apr. 28, 1 984. Warren Fuller, BNHP 

Dec. 8 City of Boston accepted portions of First and Third Aves. 
and 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th Sts. as public streets. 

1984 

Jan. 20 Phase I of Pier 2 rehabilitation project (bents 0-10) com- 
pleted. 

Apr. 28 Sail training vessel Spirit of Massachusetts launched; 
commissioned on June 3, 1 984. 

May 23 BRA designated Incubator Associates as the developer 
of Building 36. 

June BRA awarded contract for demolition of sections of Pier 3. 

July 12 Shipways 1 (Parcels 3E, 3F) conveyed to Immobiliare New 
England by the BRA. 

July 27 Replacement of deck on Dry Dock 1 Caisson completed. 

July 31 Massport entered into 20-year sublease (with one ten- 
year extension option) of 24 acres on the North Jetty to 
Boston Port Service for operation of an autoport for 
Subaru. 

EDIC entered into a 20-year lease with Boston Port Ser- 
vice for Building 3 1 at the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 

Aug. 14 Master deed by Immobiliare New England established 
Shipways Condominium, covering Shipways Place I town- 
houses. 

Oct. 2 John J. Burchill assumed position of Superintendent of 
Boston National Historical Park. 

Dec. Bronstein Industrial Center completed its development of 
800,000 square feet in Sections B-D of Building 1 14 at the 
former Boston Army Base. 

Dec. 27 BRA entered into 80-year lease with Incubator Associates 
for Building 36. 

1985 

Jan. Rehabilitation of Ironsides Place/100 First Ave. (Building 

36) began. 

Feb. 8 BRA conveyed Building 1 07 (0.47 acres) to the NPS; NPS 
had previously occupied the building under an agreement 
signed on Apr. 2, 1979. 

Feb. 9 NPS granted right-of-way easements for the portions of 
Constitution Rd. and Chelsea St. (Chelsea- Water Sts. Con- 
nector) within the Navy Yard unit of Boston NHP (0.95 
acres) to the BRA. 



Mar. 


13 


Mar. 


21 


Apr. 




Apr. 


12 


Apr. 


22 


May 23 



Feb. 15 EDIC entered into a 15-year lease with Coastal Cement 
Corp. for Parcel K at the former Boston Army Base for 
construction of a bulk cement terminal. The lease was 
extended on May 1 , 1 999, to 25 years with four five-year 
extension options. 

Six-alarm fire damaged Building 1 03; reportedly started by 
torch being used by workers rehabilitating the structure. 
EDIC entered into 50-year lease with New England Design 
Center for Sections E and F of Building 1 14 at the former 
Boston Army Base. 

BRA designated Basilica Associates as developer of Build- 
ing 106. 

BRA conveyed Shipways 2 (Parcels 3G 3H, 3K.) and Pier 8 
(Parcels 3B 1 , 3C 1 , 2C, 3 J) to Immobiliare New England and 
Building 103 (Parcel 3 A) to Building 103 Associates LP. 
Reconstruction of Truck Scale (Structure 235) completed. 
BRA entered into 80-year lease with Constitution Office 
Park Associates for Building 1 49 and with Navy Yard Park- 
ing Associates/LNRC Venture for Building 1 99. 

June 3 Phase II of Pier 2 rehabilitation project, covering bents 1 0- 
27, completed. 

Chelsea-Water Sts. Connector project completed. 
EDIC entered into 20-year lease (with two five-year exten- 
sion options) with John Nagle Co. for Building 53 at the 
Boston Marine Industrial Park. 
Shipyard Quarters Marina at Pier 8 completed. 
Boston Design Center opened in Sections E-F of Building 
1 1 4 at the former Boston Army Base. 
BRA entered into 65-year lease with John Paul Jones LP 
for Building 120. 

Master deed for Shipways Condominium amended to in- 
clude Shipways Place II townhouses. 
Rehabilitation of the Anchorage (Building 103) completed. 
NPS granted right-of-way easement for 5th St. (0.83 acres) 
to the BRA. 

Dec. 18 BRA entered into 80-year lease with Navy Yard Plaza De- 
velopment-34 for Building 34. 

1986 

First floor of Marine Barracks (Building I) rehabilitated as 
offices for Boston NHP Superintendent. 

Jan. 14 USS Cassin Young {DD-193) designated as National His- 
toric Landmark. 

Jan. 31 BRA entered into 65-year lease with Captain's Quarters 
LP for Building 266 (Quarters L-M-N-O). 

Mar 10 Master deed for Shipways Condominium amended to in- 
clude Shipways Place Garage. 

Mar. 20 BRA designated New Medico/Kendall Group as devel- 
oper of Building 62; Conroy-Heafitz Development Team 
as developer of Building 96; and Boston Investment & 
Development Co. as developer of Building 108. 

Apr. EDIC renamed streets at Boston Marine Industrial Park to 

avoid duplication with existing South Boston street names. 

May Black Falcon Cruise Terminal in Building 1 1 9 at the former 
Boston Army Base opened by Massport. 

May 1 BRA designated the Congress Group and Immobiliare New 
England as the tentative developer of Building 105. 



Summer 


July 17 


Sept. 


Sept. 


Oct. 31 


Nov. 22 


Dec. 


Dec. 4 



1146 - 



Appendix A, Chronology 



• .»« J jmirn ■■»■•' 

!"■■ "■!»!!! ' ni ■■■■>» 

^nifii !!2 B " B "I 




The massive Storehouse (Building 1 1 4) at the former Boston Army Base 
was rehabilitated in three phases between 1 984 and 1 988. The west end 
was developed as the Boston Design Center, a name commonly but erro- 
neously applied to the entire structure. Flansburgh Associates 

Rehabilitation of Navy Yard Parking Facility (Building 199) 
completed. 

Pier 7 (Parcel 3B) conveyed to Immobiliare New England 
by the BRA. 

BRA entered into 80-year lease with Basilica Associates I 
for Building 106. 

Navy Yard Realty Trust purchased the Navy Yard hold- 
ings of Immobiliare New England, including Shipways 1 
and 2 and Piers 7 and 8. 

BRA entered into 80-year lease with Navy Yard Plaza De- 
velopment Associates-33 for Building 33. 
Phase III of Pier 2 rehabilitation project, covering bents 
27-33, begun. 

Rehabilitation of Parris Building (Building 34) completed. 
BRA awarded contract for Shipyard Park Phase III; work 
was completed in late 1 988. 

Rehabilitation of Captains Quarters (Quarters L-M-N-O/ 
Building 266) completed. 

First Annual Commemorative Sea Trials of USS Cassin 
Young held. 

Rehabilitation of John Paul Jones House (Building 120) 
completed. 

Memorandum of Agreement between NPS and Massa- 
chusetts State Historic Preservation Officer regarding par- 
tial demolition of Marine Railway 1 1 ratified by Advisory 
Council on Historic Preservation. 
Dec. 30 Lease of Building 149 transferred to Navy Yard-Bio- 
technical Research Associates; majority of space in Build- 
ing 149 subleased to Massachusetts General Hospital. 

1987 

East end of second floor of Building 107 rehabilitated as 
offices for Boston NHP Maintenance Division. 
— Harpoon Brewery began operations in Building 53 at the 
Boston Marine Industrial Park. 
Mar. 26 Revisions to GMP for Charlestown Navy Yard unit of Bos- 
ton NHP approved. 

Water shuttle service commenced between Pier 4 and Long 
Wharf in downtown Boston. 

Master deed by Navy Yard Realty Trust established Con- 
stellation Wharf Condominium on Pier 7. 
U.S. Coast Guard issued first pollution notice regarding 
creosote from Pier 2 Phase III reconstruction; project was 



June 


June 27 


June 30 


July 9 


Sept. 1 


Sept. 30 



terminated on Aug. 7, 1 987. prior to completion. 

June Coastal Cement completed construction of cement termi- 
nal and Pier 10 Park on the site oft he former Boston Army 
Base Power House. 

Courageous Sailing Center established on Pier 4. 
EDIC received approval from Massachusetts Department 
of Environmental Quality Engineering for reconstruction 
of Pier 10 at the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 
Rehabilitation of Billings Building (Building 33 ) completed. 
BRA entered into 80-year lease with Navy Yard Plaza De- 
velopment Associates-39 for Building 39. 
Rehabilitation of The Basilica (Building 106) completed. 
Master deed by Basilica Associates 1 established Basilica 
Leasehold Condominium in Building 106. 

Oct. 1 EDIC entered into 45-year lease (with two ten-year exten- 
sion options) with Drydock Associates for Section A of 
Building 1 1 4 at the former Boston Army Base. 

Oct. 27 Building 197 (Parcel 1A1) conveyed to Flagship Wharf 
Realty Trust by the BRA. 

Dec. 21 Parcel 4A-1 conveyed to Bricklayers & Laborers Non- 
profit Housing Corp. by the BRA; conveyance included 
release of interest in the property by Immobiliare New 
England. 

Dec. 22 Rehabilitation of Building 1 49 as Massachusetts General 
Hospital Biomedical Research Center completed. 

1988 

May 26 The Army granted easements to EDIC over portions of 
the Army Reserve Center at South Boston for access to 
Building 1 7 (0.02 acres), the reconstruction of the entrance 
into the Boston Marine Industrial Park from Summer St. 
(0.3 1 acres), and a landscaped park (0.07 acres). 

June 30 BRA entered into 80-year lease with Navy Yard Plaza De- 
velopment Associates-38 for Building 38. 
BRA designated NAGE Properties Inc. as developer of 
Parcel 150. 

July 1 BRA entered into 65-year lease with Joinery Shop Associ- 
ates for Building 1 14. 

July 9 BRA entered into 65-year lease with the Building 62 LP for 
Building 62. 




Architect William Rawn's design for the Navy Yard Rowhouses created a 
modern complex that was sympathetic to the scale and vocabulary of the 
historic Navy Yard. designadvisor.org 



- 1147 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



July 


20 


Aug. 


11 


Aug. 


23 


Se/>l. 




Sept. 


23 


Oct. 





Feb. 5 



Apr. 19 



May 22 

June 29 

July 

Aug. 7 
Aug. 9 
Fall 
Dec. 29 



Rehabilitation of Carriage Building (Building 39) completed. 
GSA sold the retained portion of the Boston Army Base 
(35.6 acres) to the Massachusetts Port Authority for 
$3,375,000. 

Portal Crane 30 (ex-63) returned to Navy Yard from Ports- 
mouth Naval Shipyard. 

New England Aquarium announced intentions to relocate 
from Central Wharf in Downtown Boston to Dry Dock 2 in 
the Navy Yard. 

BRA entered into 65-year lease with Boston Harbor In- 
vestment Group Inc. for the Building 79. 
Navy Yard Rowhouses, developed as affordable housing 
by the Bricklayers & Laborers Non-Profit Housing Corp., 
completed. 

1989 

West end of second floor of Building 107 rehabilitated for 
use by Boston NHP Cultural Resources Division. 
Boston NHP entered into agreement to house what has 
become the Northeast Museum Services Center, first in 
Building 125 and later in the Marine Barracks and Quar- 
ters C (Building 265). 

EDIC and Government Land Bank reached a $4.3 million 
settlement with the federal government for the taking of 
67 acres for the South Boston Annex during World War II; 
agreement included transfer of Army Reserve parcel (2.18 
acres) to the Land Bank. 

Master deed by Bricklayers & Laborers Non-Profit Hous- 
ing Corp. established Charlestown Navy Yard Rowhouses 
Condominium. 

Shipyard Galley food concession opened in Building 10. 
Lease of Building 79 transferred to Building 79 Associ- 
ates. 

In face of opposition to its proposal to relocate to Dry 
Dock 2 at the Navy Yard, the New England Aquarium de- 
cided to relocate to Dry Dock 5 instead. 
EDIC conveyed 1 .703 acres of the Boston Marine Indus- 
trial Park to the U.S. Army for $ 1 .2 million. 
Leases of Buildings 149 and 1 99 transferred to Massachu- 
setts Industrial Finance Agency. 

Dry Dock 3 Park at Boston Marine Industrial Park com- 
pleted. 

EDIC signed an option agreement with Harbor Gateway 
Associates for 75-year lease covering a five-building de- 
velopment complex at the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 



1990 

Jan. BRA released new master plan for Navy Yard; focus was 

on Yard's End area. 

Mar. 27 Master deed by Flagship Wharf Realty Trust established 
Flagship Wharf Condominium in Building 197. 

Mar. 29 BRA approved Bricklayers & Laborers Non-Profit Devel- 
opment Corp. as developer of Building 104. 

Way 10 BRA designated the New England Aquarium as the tenta- 
tive developer of Dry Dock 5. 

May 18 BRA entered into 65-year lease with Building 96 Associ- 
ates tor Building 96. 




Boston Concessions Group President Joseph O'Donnell (fourth from left) 
and Boston NHP Superintendent John Burchill (third from right) cut the 
ribbon at the opening of the Shipyard Galley food service concession on 
June 29, 1989. BNHP 

June 20 EDIC entered into 45-year lease with MIP Parking Facility 
Trust for the construction and operation of a parking ga- 
rage on Parcel E [Y] at the Boston Marine Industrial Park; 
property immediately subleased to EDIC. 

July 23 EDIC entered into 20-year lease with Boston Thermal Co- 
generation Corp. for a portion of Parcel F [X] at the Bos- 
ton Marine Industrial Park; lease included four ten-year 
extension options, but was terminated on Dec. 27, 1990. 
prior to its July 1 . 1 99 1 , effective date. 

Sept. SS Martha s Vineyard, a former coastal passenger vessel, 
sank at Pier 1 1 ; her remains were subsequently scrapped. 

Sept. 7 In formal comments on the proposed BRA master plan for 
the Navy Yard, the NPS repeated previous refusal to allow 
move of Building 75 from the Historic Monument Area to 
Parcel 6 in the New Development Area. 

Sept. 28 BRA entered into a revised land disposition agreement 
with Immobilaire New England; major focus of the revi- 
sions was to reflect the possible relocation of the New 
England Aquarium to Dry Dock 5. 

Oct. 11 BRA approved its revised master plan for Navy Yard. 

Dec. City of Boston Zoning Commission approved new zoning 
regulations for the Navy Yard that increased maximum 
building heights. 

1991 

New Central Parking Structure with a 1.100-car capacity 
completed at the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 
Flagship Wharf (Building 197) development completed. 

July Building 206 destroyed by fire. 

July 19 Amendment to design guidelines for the New Develop- 
ment Area approved. 

Aug. 26 BRA entered into 65-year lease with Parcel 1 50 Associates 
Joint Venture for Parcel 1 50. 

May 30 Massachusetts Highway Dept. issued first order taking 
easements at the Boston Marine Industrial Park for con- 
struction of the Third Harbor (Ted Williams) Tunnel. 

Sept. 14 The American Society for Nondestructive Testing desig- 
nated Buildirm 34 as an ASTN Historic Landmark. 



1148 



Appendix A, Chronology 



Since acquiring the South Boston Annex, the City of Boston has leased Dry 
Dock 3 to private ship repair firms. This Aug. 28, 1992, view shows Queen 
Elizabeth 2 in the dock for inspection and emergency repairs after the 
Cunard liner had gone aground in Vineyard Sound off the southern Massa- 
chusetts coast. Stephen P. Carlson, BNHP 

Oct. 25 Naval Historical Center Detachment, Boston established 
with Charles Deans as Director; included Constitution 
Maintenance & Repair Group and other functions for- 
merly pro\ ided by SUPSHIPS Boston. 

Dec. Caisson for Dry Dock 1 returned following drydocking 
and overhaul at a shipyard in East Boston. 

Dec. 2 Building 104 (Parcel 31) conveyed to Bricklayers & Car- 
penters Charlestown Non-Profit Development Corp. by 
the BRA; property is immediately reconveyed to Building 
104 LP. 

Dec. 3 Lease of Building 62 transferred to Building 62 Corp. 

1992 

Apr. 15 BRA issued Charlestown Navy Yard Pier Management 
Plan covering future use and development of Piers 3 
through 1 1 . 

Developers for the Whydah Pirate Ship announced plans 
to locate in the Yard's End area of the Navy Yard. 
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issued a public notice sum- 
marizing its proposed activities in the Navy Yard under 
the Defense Environmental Restoration Program-Formerly 
Used Defense Sites (DERP-FUDS). 
U.S. Coast Guard promulgated regulations establishing a 
safety zone around USS Constitution both while under- 
w a\ and at her Pier 1 berth. 

Sail Boston 1992, celebrating Columbus Quincentenary, 
opened; continued through July 16. Charlestown Navy 
Yard, South Boston Annex, and Boston Army Base (Black 
Falcon Pier) were major berthing locations for both Navy 
and Tall Ship participants. 

Lease of Building 62 transferred to MGH Professional Ser- 
vices Corp. 

Massachusetts Highway Dept. received license for the 
construction and use of a temporary barge loading facility 
in the Massport Marine Terminal in connection with the 
Central Artery /Tunnel project. 

Lease of Building 38 transferred to Nantucket Develop- 
ment Corp. 

New England Aquarium formally withdrew plans to move 
to Dry Dock 5 at the Navy Yard. 

USS Constitution entered Dry Dock 1 for restoration; 
undocked on Sept. 26. 1 995. 

In face of opposition from the National Park Service and 
others, developers of the Whydah Pirate Ship withdraw 
plans to locate at the Navy Yard. 

1993 

Rehabilitation of Cooper Building (Building 38) completed. 
14 Lease of Building 106 transferred to Building 106 LP 

A.C. Cruise Lines began operations from Wharfs at the 

Boston Marine Industrial Park. 
27 Massachusetts Korean War Veterans Memorial dedicated 

in Shipyard Park. 




Aug. 


19 


Sept. 


2 


Sept. 


13 


Sept. 


14 


Oct. 


16 



Dec. 1 
Dec. 28 



Apr. 1 

Apr. 10 

Apr. 14 
Apr. 27 

Aug. 18 

Sept. 19 
Nov. 10 



First Annual Boston Seaport Festival held at Charlestown 
Navy Yard; continued through Aug. 22. 
Lease of Parcel 150 transferred to Massachusetts Trust- 
ees of the International Committee of Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association for Army and Navy Work Inc. 
Groundbreaking ceremony held for USS Constitution 
Museum expansion project. 

U.S. Coast Guard promulgated regulations establishing a 
safety zone around USS Cassin Young while underway. 
BRA certified that Armed Forces YMCA building on site 
of Building 1 50 was substantially complete; structure was 
first totally-new building built within the Historic Monu- 
ment Area of the Navy Yard. 

BRA entered into 65-year lease with Building P Associ- 
ates for Quarters P, effective from June 1 7, 1 993. 
BRA and EDIC merged into a single agency, uniting the 
city redevelopment of the Navy Yard and the Boston 
Marine Industrial Park. 

1994 

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed cleaning and 
filling of Fuel Oil Tank (Structure 220) under lawn of 
Commandant's House and associated fuel oil lines; work 
also included removal of other above- and underground 
storage tanks in the BRA portions of the Navy Yard. 
Rehabilitation of Hemp House (Building 62), Timber House 
(Building 75), Boiler House (Building 79), Power House 
(Building 96), and Officers' Quarters (Quarters P) com- 
pleted. 

BRA granted license to NPS for use of eastern portion of 
Baxter Road within Shipyard Park parcel. 
Construction of Gate 6 began with demolition of wing of 
Building 1 1 4; gate opened to traffic in 1 997. 
Lease of Building 33 transferred to Building 33 Realty Trust. 
BRA entered into 65-ycar lease with BioLease Inc. for Build- 
ing 75. 

Second Annual Boston Seaport Festival held on Pier 1 ; 
continued through Aug. 2 1 . 
Lease of Building 33 transferred to Kilkee LP. 
Serving the Fleet exhibit on Navy Yard history opened in 
Building 125. 

1995 

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed demolition of 
Buildings 203, 206, and 277, as well as Piers 9 and 1 and 
the Marine Railway superstructure. 



1149 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



EDIC entered into a license agreement for the use of Dry 
Dock 3 by Boston Ship Repair. 

Jan. 26 Leases of Building 149 and 199 transferred to Massachu- 
setts Biomedical Research Corp. 

Mar. 25 Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority established 
bus route 93.2, a variation of route 93, Sullivan Sq. to 
Downtown Crossing via Bunker Hill St., through the Navy 
Yard, the first public transportation service within the yard. 

Apr. 1 EDIC entered into 5-year lease (with a two-year extension 
option), effective from Nov. 1 , 1 995, with Boston Sand & 
Gravel for Building 16 at the Boston Marine Industrial 
Park. 

May 15 EDIC entered into 1 0-year lease, effective from Apr. 1 , 1 996, 
with Geo-Trans International ( Boston Freight Terminals) 
for Building 1 9 at the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 

July EDIC entered into a license agreement with the Federated 
Dorchester Neighborhood Houses for the establishment 
of the Big Dig Diner as a culinary training school at the 
Boston Marine Industrial Park. 

Dec. 15 Ted Williams Tunnel under Boston Harbor opened be- 
tween South Boston and East Boston. Tunnel Vent Build- 
ing 6 was built in the Massport Marine Terminal in the 
vicinity of former Pier 4 at the South Boston Annex. 

1996 

Jan. 18 Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino proposed the sale of 

the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 

Lease of Building 38 transferred to Building 38 Ventures. 

HM Y Britannia arrived at Pier 1 for a port visit continuing 

until Apr. 8, 1 996. Boston NHP implemented its first high- 
security plan for the event. 

Mare Island Naval Shipyard disestablished. 

Charleston Naval Shipyard disestablished. 

SS Nobska entered Dry Dock 1 for restoration. 

USS Constitution Museum opened new exhibit galleries 

in Building 28. 
Aug. 15 EDIC designated Boston Seafood Distribution Center as 

developer of Parcel X, the site of the demolished Building 

30, at the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 
Sept. 26 Philadelphia Naval Shipyard disestablished. 
Nov. 1 Leaseof Building 120 transferred to JRC Ventures. 

1997 

Jan. 10 EDIC entered into 60-year lease with New Boston Sea- 
food Center for Parcel X at the Boston Marine Industrial 
Park. 



Feb. 8 


Mar. 28 


Mar. 31 


Apr. 1 


Apr. 25 


July 26 





USS Constitution Museum Executive Director Burt Logan. Membership Sec- 
retary Marilyn Scanlan, and Boston NHP Deputy Superintendent Peter Steele 
cut the ceremonial ribbon opening the South Courtyard of the expanded 
USS Constitution Museum. The Oct. 5, 1 997, ceremony marked the comple- 
tion of the Museum expansion project. Dan McCarthy. BNHP 



NPS assumed operation of Bunker Hill Pavilion as Navy 
Yard Visitor Center. 

BRA entered into 65-year lease with MJC Realty Trust for 
the Muster House (Building 3 1 ). 

Massachusetts Highway Dept. transferred ownership of 
Vent Building 6 to Massachusetts Turnpike Authority. 
USS Constitution sailed under own power for first time 
since 1881. 

Long Beach Naval Shipyard disestablished. 
USS Constitution Museum expansion project completed 
with dedication of South Courtyard (formerly 5th St.). 
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers entered into a Memoran- 
dum of Agreement with the NPS, BRA, and other parties 
governing proposed cleanup of hazardous materials 
present in the Chain Forge (Building 105) and on the equip- 
ment in the structure. 
Lease of Building 1 06 transferred to Basilica Realty Corp. 



Apr. 4 


Apr. 4 


July 1 


Julv 21 


Sept. 30 


Oct. 5 



Dec. 



Dec. 23 



In 1994 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers removed the underground fuel 
tanks outside of the Power Plant (Building 108) in the Navy Yard. Two 
years later, the Corps returned to the site to ensure that all contaminated 
soil in the area had been removed. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 



1998 

Jan. 13 Leases of Buildings 79 and 96 transferred to ARE-79/96 
Charlestown Navy Yard LLC. 

Mar. 24 Master deed by New Boston Seafood Center established 
New Boston Seafood Center Leasehold Condominium 
covering Building 1 (310-312 Northern Ave.) and Building 
2 (5-7 Fid Kennedy Ave.) on Parcel X. 

Apr. 22 Junior League of Boston Decorators' Show House opened 
in the Commandant's House (Quarters G). The event con- 
tinued through May 22. 

June 9 Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jay L. Johnson announced 
that future operations of USS Constitution would be re- 
stricted to the sheltered waters of Massachusetts Bay, 
ending plans for the frigate to visit other ports. 

July 23 USS ( Constitution Bicentennial Salute held at Charleston n 
Navy Yard and at Boston Army Base (Black Falcon Termi- 
nal) through July 28. 

Aug. Boston NHP entered into an agreement to provide space 
in Building 1 for the Boston Academy of Music. 

Dec. 28 Lease of Building 120 transferred to Navy Yard Dispen- 
sary Building LLC. 



1 1 50 - 



Appendix A, Chronology 




The Navy Yard has had long associations with Massachusetts' two most prominent political families. As President, John Adams approved the 
establishment of the yard, while his great-great-great grandson Charles Francis Adams IV was a founder of the USS Constitution Museum. The 
association with the Kennedy family was more recent. At left, U.S. Representative John F. Kennedy speaks at the Nov. 17,1 949, recommissioning of USS 
Cony (DD-508). At right, his brother, U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy, addresses an Apr. 7, 1998, ceremony marking the bicentennial of the U.S. Public 
Health Service. BOSTS-10799 (left); Richard A. Tourangeau, BNHP (right) 



1999 

Buildings 131, 165, 165 A, 178, and 1 93 demolished. 
Rehabilitation of Building 79 completed. 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 
issued determination of eligibility permitting construction 
of Harborlights Pavilion performance center on Wharf 8 at 
the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 
The elevated walkway and stairs extending from Building 
10 across 3rd St. onto Pier 1 removed. 
Lease of Building 33 transferred to Harbor Development 
Associates and Building 33 LLC; Harbor Development 
Associates immediately transferred its interest to Build- 
ing 33 LLC. 

Massport entered into 50-year lease with International 
Cargo Port-Boston for Buildings 1 1 7 and 1 1 8 at the former 
Boston Army Base. 

EDIC entered into 25-year lease (with four ten-year exten- 
sion options) with 5-1 1 Drydock LLC for Parcel B at the 
former Boston Army Base for construction of a new build- 
ing for North Coast Sea-Foods. 

BankBoston Pavilion performance center on Wharf 8 at 
the Boston Marine Industrial Park opened. 
Ninth Annual Boston Seaport Festival held on Pier 1 ; event 
continued through July 25. 

BRA issued certificate of completion for second phase of 
restoration of Muster House (Building 3 1 ). 
Lease of Muster House (Building 31) sold to Royalston 
Trust. 

Lease of Building 1 14 transferred to Massachusetts Bio- 
medical Research Corp. 

The NPS awarded a contract for the repaying of public 
roads within the NPS area of the Navy Yard; work, which 
included stabilization of the Pier 1 bulkhead and resurfac- 
ing of the concrete deck around end of Pier 1 , was sub- 
stantially completed in June 2000. 
EDIC entered into 66-year lease with Dcmctri Enterprises 
for Building 54 at the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 



2000 

— South Pier Shed (Building 1 1 8) at the former Boston Army 
Base converted into the International Cargo Port; project 
also saw demolition of North Pier Shed (Building 1 1 7). 

Feb. 17 Massport entered into 30-year sublease with Pilot Sea- 
food Properties for Parcel M-3 (8 Seafood Way) in the 
Massport Marine Terminal. 

Mar. 1 Deputy Superintendent Peter Steele became Acting Su- 
perintendent of Boston NHP upon the resignation of Su- 
perintendent John Burchill. 

May 13 Marine Barracks (Quarters I), oldest Marine Barracks in 
United States, rededicated. 

June 30 Production of operetta HMS Pinafore mounted on Pier 1 
with USS Constitution as backdrop; performances con- 
tinued through July 2. 

July 11 Sail Boston 2000 opened; continued through July 16. 
Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston Marine Industrial Park, 
and Black Falcon Terminal were major berthing locations 
for both Navy and Tall Ship participants. 

Sept. 2 Navy Yard Workers Reunion celebrated the bicentennial 
of the establishment of the Charlestown Navy Yard; two- 
day event included special reunion cruise on USS Cassin 
Young on Sept. 3. 

Sept. 18 Lease of Building 36 transferred to MGH Institute of I lealth 
Professions. 

Nov. 21 Terry W. Savage assumed position as Superintendent of 
Boston NHP. 

Dec. 8 Navy Galley in Building 5 named for MS3 Ronchester 
Santiago, a former USS Constitution crewmember killed in 
the Oct. 1 2, 2000, terrorist attack on USS Cole (DDG-67). 

2001 

May 16 Boatworks Building (Building 114) opened following 
completion of rehabilitation. 

July U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed project to clean 
Chain Forge equipment as part of its efforts to remediate 
hazardous materials found in Building 105. 



1151 



THE CHARLESTOWN NAVY YARD unit of Boston National His- 
torical Park has been the scene of numerous special events. This 
gallery features images from one such occasion, the July 1 998 USS 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 

USS Constitution Bicentennial Salute: A Gallery 

Constitution Bicentennial Salute, and is adapted from an article 



which first appeared in the park's newsletter, The Broadside. (All 
photos by Julia Mize and Richard Tourangeau, Boston NHR) 




Noontime threatening skies on Thursday, July 23, turned into 
a full-fledged summer thunderstorm that chased Constitu- 
tion back into her Bicentennial Park berth. 



Beat Retreat 




By Friday, July 24, skies had cleared and people started to swarm to Bicentennial 
Park to visit the three tall ships, including ARA Libertad (Q-2) at Pier 1 East, and 
sample the offerings of the many food vendors. 




On Friday evening, Her Majesty's Royal Marine Band Plymouth (above) 
performed Beat Retreat in the Navy Yard. They were joined in these 
drills by the U.S. Marines and the crew of USS Constitution (right). 
For visitors to the yard during the week before the celebrations 
could experience the Marines rehearsing their drills (below) on the 
parade ground of the Marine Barracks. 





Captains' Reception 



The Commandant's House was the venue for a Friday evening Captains' Reception. 
The 1812 Marines formed the honor guard as Britain's Prince Andrew (top of stairs) 
and USS Constitution Commander Christopher Melhuish arrived. 



m 






*i < 


r 








*&$*. 


L P 



II 52 



Appendix A, Chronology 



USS Constitution Bicentennial Salute: A Gallery 




Among the many musical groups playing to the wandering 
crowds was the Metropolitan District Commission band. 




Masts and flags as far as the eye could see greeted visitors 
and brightened up the Navy Yard for the weekend. USCG 
Eagle (WIX-327) is berthed at Pier 1 behind USS Constitution. 





This entrant appeared the most spirited contestant in Saturday evening's 
Parade of Lights. 




Saturday and Sunday, July 25 and 26, saw record crowds (estimated at 
100,000 on Saturday alone) visit Bicentennial Park to experience the 
ships and other activities. 




There were plenty of park rangers on hand to assist visitors so 
that they could find their way to the many activities. (Above left) 
The long shadows indicate the late hour as Nneka Jenkins and 
Ebony Robinson direct visitors on Saturday near Gate One. (Above) 
There were plenty of free handouts from tables throughout the 
yard. (Left) The younger visitors were treated to special pro- 
grams. Here Ranger Juliet Friedman helps some children learn to 
spell their names with signal flags. 



1153 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



July 20 A monument to memorialize all seven naval vessels named 
Boston featuring the bell from USS Boston (CAG- 1 ) dedi- 
cated on Pier 1 . 

Aug. 2 BRA designated Kenney Development Co. as the devel- 
oper of Parcel 39A. 

Aug. 23 Lease of Building 19 at Boston Marine Industrial Park 
transferred to International Cargo Development LLC. 

Sept. 6 Pilot Seafood Distribution Center at the Massport Marine 
Terminal opened. 

Sept. 11 Following the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center 
and the Pentagon, the Charlestown Navy Yard unit of 
Boston NHP closed to the public; the site reopened on 
Sept. 29, with increased security in place. 

Oct. 19 EDIC entered into 40-year lease (with a ten-year extension 
option) with Wharf 8 Associates for Building 56 at the 
Boston Marine Industrial Park. 

Nov. 8 USS Constitution reopened for public tours; ship had 
been closed since Sept. 1 1, 2001 . Reopening included the 
institution of security screening of all visitors to the ship. 

2002 

Apr. 4 Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 
approved construction of 300-space addition to Central 
Parking Structure at the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 
Ropewalk ( Building 58) severely damaged by nine-alarm 
arson fire. 

City of Boston accepted additional portions of First and 
Third Aves. as well as Fourth and Fifth Aves. and 1 3th and 
1 6th Sts. as public streets. 

Hull Lifesaving Museum's Navy Yard Rowing Center boat 
shop on Pier 2 destroyed by arson fire. 
Dry Dock 3 Park dedicated as Brian R. Skerry Memorial 
Park. 

Amendments to design guidelines for the Historic Monu- 
ment Area, including those for Buildings 58, 60, 75, 1 05, 
1 1 4, and 1 99, as well as Gate 6, approved by the National 
Park Service. 

Dec. 20 Massport entered into 17.5-year sublease (with one four- 
year and six five-year extension options), effective Oct. 7, 
2002, with Legal Sea Foods for Parcel M-4 (1 Seafood 
Way) in the Massport Marine Terminal. 



May 


4 


July 


11 


Aug. 


13 


Sept 


13 


Oct. 


8 





USS Cassin Young, a veteran of World War II in the Pacific, served as an 
appropriate backdrop and stage for an Aug. 2003 staging of the musical 
South Pacific. Clive Grainger 



Boston National Historical Park Superintendent Terry W. Savage (center) is 
seen with Secretary of the Interior Gale L. Norton during the secretary's 
visit to the Charlestown Navy Yard on May 28, 2003. Park Public Affairs 
Officer Sean Hennessey is at left. BNHP 

2003 

Jan. 13 Offices of Boston Academy of Music in Building 1 dam- 
aged by fire. 

May 3 Installation of hydraulic security barriers (Structure 285) 
on First Ave. completed. 

May 22 BRA approved issuance of license to Testa Corp. for use 
of Pier 1 1 as laydown space during demolition of the Cen- 
tral Artery. 

June 20 Repairs to fire damage of Ropewalk (Building 58) com- 
pleted by the BRA. 

July Conversion of Building 265, Quarters B, into office space 
for Interpretation Division of Boston National Historical 
Park completed. 

July 31 EDIC designated Preferred Freezer Services as the devel- 
oper of Building 1 6 at the Boston Marine Industrial Park; 
this superseded a Nov. 14, 2002, designation of Highland 
Marine LP as developer of this structure. 

Aug. 8 Production of the musical South Pacific mounted on Pier 
1 with USS Cassin Young as backdrop; performances con- 
tinued through Aug. 10,2003. 

A ug. 22 Big Dig Dinner at the Boston Marine Industrial Park closed. 

Sept. 29 Security Screening Facility (Building 287) for USS Consti- 
tution visitors constructed on Pier 1 . 

Nov. New Legal Sea Foods facility in Massport Marine Termi- 
nal seafood district dedicated. 

2004 

Jan. 22 Lease of International Cargo Port at the former Boston 
Army Base transferred to AMB Fund III Boston. 

Mar. 11 BRA entered into land disposition agreement with Carlyle 
CQ Boston for Building 42. 

Mar. 25 Carlyle CQ Boston purchased Building 42 along with Par- 
cels 2C and 3D. 

Apr. 20 Junior League of Boston's Decorators Show House 
opened in the Commandant's House: event continued 
through May 27. 

Apr. 21 NPS assigned structure numbers to previously unnum- 
bered Navy structures and new structures erected within 
its portion of the Charlestown Navy Yard. 

May Conversion of Building 265. Quarters C. into office space 
for use by Northeast Museum Sen ices Center completed. 



154 



Appendix A, Chronology 




Since the 1 930s, the Boston Army Base has been served by buses oper- 
ated by the Boston Elevated Railway Co. and its public agency succes- 
sors, the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) and the Massachusetts Bay 
Transportation Authority (MBTA). In December 2004 the earlier all-surface 
route 6 to Haymarket via South Station was replaced by Silver Line route 
SL2, which used dual-mode (diesel and electric) articulated vehicles and 
entered a subway link to South Station. Here, MBTA 1111 makes the turn 
into the loop serving the International Cargo Port on Mar. 5, 2005. The Black 
Falcon Terminal is in the background. Douglas Carrier, nycsubway.org 

NPS Guard Booth (Building 288) placed in service at the 
Security Barriers (Structure 285) on First Ave. 
BRA approved transfer of development rights for Parcels 
6 and 7 from LDA Acquisition to Partners HealthCare Sys- 
tem. 

Formation of Friends of the Charlestown Navy Yard an- 
nounced. The non-profit organization was intended to 
promote the improvement of the quality of life for Navy 
Yard residents, workers, and visitors. 
Master deed by Carlyle CQ Boston established Parris Land- 
ing Condominium in Building 42. 

NPS completed a project to stabilize the bulkhead adja- 
cent to the Pier 3 Marginal Wharf south of Building 125. 
BRA entered into land disposition agreement with Navy 
Yard Four Association LP for Parcel 4. 
Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino announced plans to 
develop the Ropewalk as a creative business incubator. 
BRA entered into land disposition agreement with LDA 
Pier 5 LLC for Parcels IB, 1C (Pier 5). 
MBTA Silver Line route SL2 began operation from South 
Station into Boston Marine Industrial Park; MBTA bus 
route 6, Boston Army Base-Haymarket, which had previ- 
ously served BMIP, cut back to South Station. 

2005 

MBTA water shuttle service F3 from Lovejoy Wharf to 
Pier 4 discontinued. 

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 
issued Chapter 91 license to EDIC approving the ED1C 
master plan for future development of the Boston Marine 
Industrial Park. 

NPS entered into agreement with Eastern National for the 
management of the Commandant's House as a function 
facility. 

Massport approved development proposal for a three- 
building Boston Cargo Terminal at the Massport Marine 
Terminal. 



May 26 Parcel 4 (Parcels 4A2, 4C, 4D, 4E) conveyed to Navy Yard 
Four Associates by the BRA. 

June 11 Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 
issued Chapter 91 license to Navy Yard Four Associates 
for construction of HarborView condominium project on 
Parcel 4. 

Aug. 5 EDIC entered into 35-year lease (with three ten-year ex- 
tension options) with 1CCNE LLC for Buildings 1 5 and 19, 
as well as the existing International Cargo Center (6 Har- 
bor St./33 1 Northern Ave.) for construction of new inter- 
national cargo-handling facility. 

Aug. 9 Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital announced its inten- 
tion to relocate to Parcel 6 at Yard's End. 

Dec. 29 Lease of Building 120 transferred to Second Mass Ave 
Realty Trust. 

2006 

Jan. 10 Legislation authorizing exception to Harbor Line for pile 
walkway at Building 1 14 approved. 

Mar. 13 Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 
issued Chapter 9 1 license to LDA Pier 9 LLC for expansion 
of Shipyard Quarters Marina. 

Apr. 10 Rehabilitation of the ground floor and utility systems of 
the Commandant's House (Quarters G) completed. 

May Rehabilitation of the third and fourth floors of the Marine 
Barracks (Building I) completed. 

May 25 Rehabilitation of the exterior and constaiction of an el- 
evator in Building 125 completed. 

June 8 Portable Building M-37 irreparably damaged while being 
removed from Dry Dock 1 . 

July 7 Removal of derelict SS Nobska from Dry Dock 1 com- 
pleted. 

July 18 NPS Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation moved 
into Quarters C at the Navy Yard following return of North- 
east Museum Services Center to the Marine Barracks. 

July 28 Boston National Historical Park Protection Division dis- 
patch center moved from Scale House (Building 19) to 
Building 109. 

Aug. 25 Lease of Building 75 transferred to Massachusetts Bio- 
medical Research Corp. 

Oct. 2 Sublease of Parcel M-3 (8 Seafood Way) in the Massport 
Marine Terminal transferred to APCA Harbor Seafood. 

Oct. 16 Massport issued request for expressions o\ interest in a 
proposed expansion of Black Falcon Terminal. 

Dec. 12 Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino announced his inten- 
tion to relocate Boston City I [all to Dry Dock 4. 

2007 

— Wooden extension of Building 21 at the Boston Marine 
Industrial Park demolished. 

— Big Dig Diner moved to Ohio. 

.A//;. 10 EDIC entered into 75-year lease, effective from Jan. 30, 
2007, with CV Dry DockAvenue lor Sections B, ( . and I) 
of Building 114 at the former Boston \nm Base: lease 
superseded that of Sept. 15. 1983, with Boston Harbor 
Partners. 

Feb. The Massachusetts Trustees for Armed Services Work, 



1155 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 




Dry Dock 3 remains an active ship repair facility. At left, the Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH-20) is seen in the dock on Apr. 22, 2007, while at 
right the Boston Fire Department responds to a fire which broke out onboard USNS Sister (T-AKR-31 1 ) on Aug. 1 0, 2007. Since it assumed operation of 
the site in 1995, Boston Ship Repair has performed work for both the Navy and private shipowners. Surviving a 1999 scandal in which company 
executives pleaded guilty to payting kickbacks on federal contracts, the firm has thrived. In Dec. 2008 it was sold to Atlantic Marine Holdings of 
Jacksonville, Fla., and became Atlantic Marine Boston. Stephen P. Carlson, BNHP (left); George Rizer, Boston Globe (right) 



the operator of Constitution Inn (Building 150), merged 
with the YMCA of Greater Boston, Inc. 

Mar. 8 BRA approved conversion of Building 38 into an office 
condominium. 

May 8 BRA accepted a $1.5-million grant from the Massachu- 
setts Executive Office of Transportation for the Pier 3 Water 
Transportation Terminal Project. 

May 23 Master deed by Building 38 Ventures established Cooper 
Leasehold Condominium in Building 38. 

May 29 Phase I of the new International Cargo Center at the Bos- 
ton Marine Industrial Park dedicated. 

Aug. 10 USNS Sisler (T-AKR-3 1 1 ) damaged by fire while under- 
going repairs in Dry Dock 3. 

Aug. 22 The National Park Service awarded a design/build con- 
tract for the replacement of the tour boat landing barge at 
the end of Pier 1 with an accessible ferry landing facility. 

Sept. 18 BRA approved issuance of a certificate of completion to 
Navy Yard Four Associates for the HarborView project. 
BRA approved the Boston Cargo Terminal Project for the 
Massport Marine Terminal; this project had initially been 
approved by Massport in June 2005. 

Oct. 23 BRA approved conversion of Building 33 from offices to 
residential apartments. 

Nov. 15 Cargo Ventures announced plan for joint redevelopment 
of the Bronstein Center (Building 1 14) and expansion of 
the Black Falcon Terminal (Building 119). 



After many years of controversy, the HarborView project on Parcel 4was 
completed during 2007. Occupancy of the complex was delayed for over 
a year due to the foreclosure of the developer's mortgage. One bright side 
of the project, however, was the completion of the Boston HarborWalk 
along the site's waterfront, seen at right looking west towards the Navy 
Yard Rowhouses. The Boston Harbor Associates 



Feb. 7 



Mar. 1 



Apr. 4 

Apr. 24 
June 24 



July 3 

Sept. 4 

Sept. 19 
Dec. 29 



2008 

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 
issued Chapter 91 license to Joinery Shop Associates for 
construction of pile walkway and boat docking facility 
behind Building 114. 

EDIC entered into 40-year lease (with four five-year exten- 
sion options) with John Nagle Co. and 50-year lease (with 
four five-year extension options) with Mass. Bay Brewing 
Co. for separate portions of Building 53 at the Boston 
Marine Industrial Park. 

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 
approved BRA Waterfront Activation Plan for the 
Charlestown Navy Yard. 

Lease of Building 54 at the Boston Marine Industrial Park 
transferred to Exchange Authority LLP. 
BRA approved conversion of HarborView from condo- 
miniums to rental apartments. 

BRA designated Trcnk Family LLC (Air Pegasus) as po- 
tential developer of a heliport on Parcel C-2 at the Boston 
Marine Industiral Park. 

New Navy Yard Visitor Center in Building 5 opened. 
Lease of Building 54 at the Boston Marine Industrial Park 
transferred to Leachmore Point LLC. 
Navy Yard water shuttle shifted from Pier 4 to Pier 3 . 
Boston Mayor Thomas M. Mcnino announced deferral o\' 
plans to relocate Citj I [all to Dry Dock 4. 







1 1 56 



Appendix A, Chronology 




i, ] 

rj i>,r.i.n ^ *^^^"^B 





This July 8. 2009, panorama shows Pier 1 during Sail Boston 2009. USS Cassin Young (DD-793) can be seen at Pier 1 East, while USCG Eagle (WIX- 
327) is at Pier 1 West. BNHP 



Apr. 
June 19 

June 30 

July 8 

July 20 

July 23 



Aug. 1 
Aug. 13 



Aug. 31 
Sept. 10 



Sept. 23 



Oct. 



2009' 

Addition to Building 2 of the New Boston Seafood Center 
at the Boston Marine Industrial Park completed. 
Draft Environmental Impact Report for Spaulding Reha- 
bilitation Hospital development on Parcel 6 approved by 
state. 

Massachusetts Turnpike Authority sold a portion of Par- 
cel M-2 (MTA Parcel F-8-B) at the Boston Marine Indus- 
trial Park to NSTAR Electric Co. 

Sail Boston 2009 opened; continued through July 13. 
Charlestown Navy Yard was a major berthing location for 
Tall Ship participants. 

New Ferry Landing barge launched by Fore River Dock & 
Dredge, South Portland, Me.; barge delivered to the 
Charlestown Navy Yard on Sept. 1 6, 2009. 
Harbor line exemption revising pier and bulkhead line in 
the vicinity of Pier 1 approved; revision added approxi- 
mately 0.5 acres to the Navy Yard unit of Boston NHP. 
Jurisdiction over this area ceded to the United States by 
the Massachusetts General Court by act of July 23, 2009. 
Deputy Superintendent David R. Brouillette became Act- 
ing Superintendent of Boston NHP on the retirement of 
Superintendent Terry W. Savage. 

BRA authorized Kavanagh Advisory Group to investi- 
gate the feasibility of carrying out its Oct. 2008 proposal 
for the redevelopment of the Chain Forge (Building 105). 
New Screening Facility (Building 292) placed in service. 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 
issued Chapter 9 1 license to the National Park Service for 
construction of a new Ferry Landing at the end of Pier 1 . 
Contract for drydockingof USS Cassin Young (DD-793) 
in Dry Dock 1 for hull repairs awarded; work was sched- 
uled to be accomplished during the first half of 2010. 
Lowell's Boat Shop opened a satellite boatbuilding shop 
in Building 125. 




This Oct. 31, 2009, view shows the addition at the northeast corner of 
Building 2 of the New Boston Seafood Center. The structure was con- 
structed by F. J. O'Hara & Sons, who already owned two of the three units 
in the facility. Stephen P. Carlson, BNHP 




Boston NHP Acting Superintendent David R. Brouillette (in white shirt on 
barge) participates in an inspection of the new accessible Ferry Landing 
barge at the Fore River Dock & Dredge yard in South Portland, Me., on Aug. 
1 3, 2009. The barge was to replace the former EPA (ex-Navy) barge used 
as a tour boat landing at the end of Pier 1 since 1 978. 

Craig B. Hysler, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 

Oct. 28 FY 2010 National Defense Authorization Act signed; leg- 
islation designated USS Constitution as "America's ship 
of State." 



The events listed here serve as an addenda to the main text of this 
report, which generally reflects developments through the end of 2008. 



1157 - 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 




The peak period of shipbuilding at the Charlestown Navy Yard came immediately prior to and during World War II. This Apr. 1 . 1940, image shows the 
destroyer USS Meredith (DD-434) under construction on Shipways 1 . She would be launched a little over three weeks later, on Apr. 24, 1 940. A sister 
ship, USS Gwin (DD-433), can be seen to her right. BOSTS-11972 



II 58 



Appendix B 

Ships Built By The Navy Yard 



THIS APPENDIX is a revised and updated version of "Ships 
Built by the Charlestown Navy Yard, 1814-1957," which 
appeared as a supplement to the Spring 1995 issue of The 
Broadside. It includes all warships, auxiliaries, and service craft 
built by the Charlestown Navy Yard, including several vessels built 
elsewhere but completed by the Navy Yard. It omits small boats 
and landing craft not listed on the Naval Vessel Register (NVR). 
Warships and auxiliaries are listed alphabetically by name, 
using the current on-line Naval Vessel Register convention of list- 
ing unnamed vessels alphabetically by hull number under the des- 
ignation "No Name." In practice, the hull numbers of those ves- 
sels are considered to be their names (e.g., the unnamed LST-310 
was known as USS LST-310). 

For each vessel, the table shows its official type designation 
(including the gun rate for sailing vessels), hull number, and dates 
of keel laying, launching, and commissioning, followed by changes 
in names and hull numbers and the ultimate disposition. It should 
be noted that many vessels listed as transferred to foreign coun- 
tries remained on the NVR and were often returned to American 
custody for final disposal; such instances are not indicated here. 
For the most part, vessels listed as "sold" were sold for scrapping, 



although many LSTs and some other ships were sold for conver- 
sion to commercial service. Such details are beyond the scope of 
this listing. A separate list of foreign names assigned to Boston- 
built ships that were transferred to other navies follows the main 
tables. 

Information is given under the name of the ship at the time of 
launching, other than for escort vessels originally allocated to Great 
Britain; these are listed under the American names assigned even 
though launched under their British designations. Cross-refer- 
ences are supplied in cases where a ship name was changed either 
prior to launching or subsequent to being placed in service, in- 
cluding "names" consisting only of hull numbers. 

Service craft, which were named by a generic designation and 
number prior to July 1920 (e.g., Ammunition Lighter No. 17) and 
then by hull number (e.g., YE- 17), are arranged by hull number in 
a separate section, showing only the launch date and fate, since 
more detailed information is generally unavailable. Indeed, craft 
shown as "stricken" may in fact have been converted into another 

type- 
Unknown dates are indicated as "19??" (or "194? if a decade 
is known). 



Part I - Warships And Auxiliaries 



Name 


Type 


Hull No. 


Keel Laid 


Launched 


Commissioned Fate 


Adams s 


Screw Sloop 





1874 Feb 


1874 Oct 24 


1876 Jul 21 


Sold 1920 


Aeolus, see No Name 


(LST-310) 












Alaska 


Screw Sloop 


— 


1867 Aug 22 


1868 Oct 31 


1869 Dec 8 


Sold 1883 


Alfred Wolf 


Escort Vessel 


DE-544 


1943 Dec 9 


1944 Jan 27 


Never 


Cancelled 1944: scrapped 


Alligator 


Schooner (12) 


— 


1820Jun26 


1820 Nov 2 


1821 Mar 26 


Lost 1823 


Amberjack 


Submarine 


SS-522 


1944 Feb 8 


1944 Dec 15 


1946 Mar 4 


Transferred to Brazil 1973 


Ammonoosuc 


Screw Frigate 


— 


1863 Aug 22 


1864 Jul 21 


1868 Jun 15 


Renamed Iowa 1869; sold 

1883 
Transferred to U.S. Coast 


Apprentice 


Training Brig 





1841 


1841 


1841 














Survey 1846 


Bainbridge 


Brig (12) 


— 


1842 Feb 4 


1842 Apr 26 


1842 Dec 16 


Lost 1863 


Bebas 


Escort Vessel 


DE-10 


1942 Nov 27 


1943 Jan 9 


1943 May 15 


Ex-BDE-10 (1943); sold 1947 


Benewah 


Barracks Ship 


APB-35 


1945 Jan 2 


1945 May 6 


1946 Mar 19 


Ex-APL-35 (1944); reclassified 
1X-311 (1971); transferred to 
Philippines 1974 


Benner 


Escort Vessel 


DE-551 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


Bennett 


Destroyer 


DD-473 


1941 Dec 10 


1942 Apr 16 


1943 Feb 9 


Transferred to Brazil 1959 


Bennion 


Destroyer 


DD-662 


1943 Mar 19 


1943 Jul 4 


1943 Dec 14 


Sold 1973 


Bernalillo County, see 


; No Name (LST-306) 












Bibb 1 


Steam Revenue Cutter 


— 


1853 Feb 24 


1853 May 12 


Never 


Delivered to U.S. Coast Survey 
1853 


Biltmore, see No Name (APL-12) 












Bivin 


Escort Vessel 


DE-536 


1943 Nov 3 


1943 Dec 7 


1944 Oct 31 


Sunk as target 1969 



1 Built by Donald McKay. East Boston. Mass.. and brought to Navy Yard for completion (by McKay). 
1 Built at Navy Yard by private contractor for U.S. Treasury Department, using engines salvaged from USRC Bihh (ex /i lei) 
rebuilt rather than a new vessel. 



sometimes considered to be that vessel 



1159 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Name 



Type 



Hull No. 



Keel Laid 



Launched 



Commissioned Fate 



Boston 

Boxer 

Brazos 


Sloop-of-War(18) 
Schooner (10) 
Fuel Ship No. 16 


Bridge 
Brilliant* 


Supply Ship No. 1 
Lightship 


Cabana 


Escort Vessel 


Canandaigua 


Screw Sloop 


Canfield 


Escort Vessel 


Carlson 


Escort Vessel 


Carpellotti 

Case 

Charles R. Ware 


Escort Vessel 
Destroyer 
Escort Vessel 


Charrette 
Chesapeake* 


Destroyer 
Training Vessel 



Cloues Escort Vessel 

Colleton Barracks Ship 

Comanche, see Sagamore 
Comber Submarine 

Confiance Screw Sloop 

Connecticut Screw Sloop 

Connor Destroyer 

Consort Brig (6) 

Conyngham Destroyer 

Coronis, see No Name (LST-1003) 
Cowie Destroyer 

Creon, see No Name (LST-1036) 
Crouter Escort Vessel 

Cumberland Frigate (44) 6 

Cumberland Training Ship No. 1 

Cyane Sloop-of-War (18) 

Deede Escort Vessel 

Dempsey Escort Vessel 

Dennis J. Buckley Escort Vessel 
Detroit, see Canandaigua 
Dionne Escort Vessel 

Dormer Dock Landing Ship 



Dorado 


Submarine 


Doran 


Destroyer 


Duffy 


Escort Vessel 


Earle 


Destroyer 


Echols 


Barracks Ship 


Edward H. Allen 


Escort Vessel 


Eisner 


Escort Vessel 


Elden 


Escort Vessel 


Essex* 


Screw Sloop 



— 


1825 May 13 


1825 Oct 15 


1826 Jan 12 


Lost 1846 


— 


1831 Jun 22 


1831 Nov 22 


1832 Dec 14 


Sold 1848 


AO-4 


1917 Jun 21 


1919 May 1 


1919 Oct 1 


Scrapped 1947 


AF-1 


1915 Jun 12 


1916 May 18 


1917 Jun 2 


Sold 1947 


LV-4 


1855 


1855 Sep 11 


Never 


Delivered to U.S. Lighthouse 
Board 1855 


DE-260 


1943 Jan 27 


1943 Mar 10 


1943 Jul 9 


Sold 1947 




1861 Nov 27 


1862 Mar 28 


1862 Aug 1 


Renamed Detroit (1869); 
renamed Canandaigua 
(1869); scrapped 1884 


DE-262 


1943 Feb 23 


1943 Apr 6 


1943 Jul 22 


Sold 1947 


DE-9 


1942 Nov 27 


1943 Jan 9 


1943 May 10 


Ex-BDE-9 (1943); sold 1946 


DE-548 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DD-370 


1934 Sep 19 


1935 Sep 14 


1936 Sep 15 


Sold 1947 


DE-547 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DD-581 


1942 Feb 20 


1942 Jun 3 


1943 May 18 


Transferred to Greece 1959 


— 


1898 Aug 2 


1899 Jun 30 


1900 Apr 12 


Renamed Severn (1905); sold 
1916 


DE-265 


1943 Feb 23 


1943 Apr 6 


1943 Aug 10 


Sold 1947 


APB-36 


1945 Jun 9 


1945 Jul 10 


1946 Sep 27 5 


Ex-APL-36 (1944); sold 1973 


SS-527 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


— 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1866 


— 


1864 Jan 2 


Never 


Never 


Ex-Pompanoosuc (1869); 
scrapped 1883 


DD-582 


1942 Apr 16 


1942 Jul 18 


1943 Jun 8 


Transferred to Greece 1959 


— 


1836 Aug 


1836 Oct 25 


1836 Dec 24 


Sold 1844 


DD-371 


1934 Sep 19 


1935 Sep 14 


1936 Nov 4 


Sunk as target 1948 


DD-632 


1941 Mar 18 


1941 Sep 27 


1942 Jun 1 


Reclassified DMS-39 (1945- 
1955); sold 1972 


DE-11 


1942 Dec 8 


1943 Jan 26 


1943 May 25 


Ex-BDE-11 (1943); sold 1946 


— 


1826 Nov 29 


1842 May 24 


1843 Nov 20 


Lost 1862 


IX-8 


1904 Jan 21 


1904 Aug 17 


1907 Jul 20 


Sold 1947 


— 


1837 Jul 


1837 Dec 2 


1838 May 26 


Sold 1887 


DE-263 


1943 Feb 23 


1943 Apr 6 


1943 Jul 29 


Sold 1947 


DE-267 


1943 Mar 11 


1943 Apr 22 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


DE-553 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DE-261 


1943 Jan 27 


1943 Mar 10 


1943 Jul 16 


Sold 1947 


LSD-20 


1944 Dec 16 


1945 Apr 6 


1945 Jul 31 


Stricken 1976; sold for scrap 
2004 


SS-526 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DD-634 


1941 Jun 14 


1941 Dec 10 


1942 Aug 4 


Reclassified DMS-41 (1945- 
1955): sold 1973 


DE-268 


1943 Apr 7 


1943 May 19 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


DD-635 


1941 Jun 14 


1941 Dec 10 


1942 Sep 1 


Reclassified DMS-42 (1945- 
1955): sold 1970 


APB-38 


1945 Jun 9 


1945 Jul 30 


1947 Jan l 7 


Ex-APL-38 (1944): reclassified 
IX-504 (1976); sold 2003 


DE-531 


1943 Aug 31 


1943 Oct 7 


1943 Dec 16 


Sold 1974 


DE-269 


1943 Apr 7 


1943 May 19 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


DE-264 


1943 Feb 23 


1943 Apr 6 


1943 Aug 4 


Sold 1947 


IX-10 


1873 


1874 Oct 26 


1876 Oct 3 


Sold 1930 



3 Built for U.S. Lighthouse Board; assigned stations: BISHOP & CLERKS (1855- 1858): HANDKERCHIEF (1858-1916); RELIEF (1916-1924). 
'Built by Bath Iron Works (Hull No. 26). Bath, Me.; transferred to Navy Yard for completion 1899 Jul 

5 Completed; first commissioned 1967 Jan 28. 

6 Rebuilt as Sloop-of-War (24) in Dry Dock 1 between 1856 Aug 9 and 1857 May 23. 
'Completed; first placed in service 1961. 

! Built by Donald McKay at Portsmouth Navy Yard. Kittery. Me., and brought to Navy Yard for completion (by McKay) 1874 Oct 31. 



1160 



Appendix B, Ships Built By The Navy Yard 

Ships Built In The 19th Century: A Gallery 




USS Alaska 
This view was taken about 1 87 1 , when Alaska was serving with the Asiatic 
Squadron. BOSTS-10159 





Sail Plan, USS Alligator 

This is one of a number of spar and sail plans of warships prepared by 
Charles Ware. USS Alligatorwas lost when she went aground on Craysfort 
Reef, Fla., on November 1 9, 1 823. NHC NH-57010 




USS Bainbridge 
This sketch showing USS Bainbridge cruising off Cuba in 1 862 was drawn 
by crewmember George H. Rogers. NHC NH-56662 



USS Cumberland 
This lithograph shows Cumberland as the flagship of the Gulf Squadron 
shortly after her completion in 1 843. NHC NH-64089-KN 




USS Guerriere 
Named for HMS Guerriere, defeated by USS Constitution during the War 
of 1812, USS Guerriere is seen at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, during her ser- 
vice as flagship of the South American Squadron between June 1 867 and 
June 1869. BOSTS-11290 



USS Housatonic 
This wash drawing of USS Housatonic was done by R.G Skerrett in 1 902. 
On February 17, 1864, while anchored off Charleston, S.C., Housatonic 
gained the unwanted distinction of becoming the first warship to be sunk 
by a submarine when she fell victim to the Confederate submarine H.L. 
Hunley. NHC NH-53573 



I16I - 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 
Ships Built In The 19th Century: A Gallery 





USS Porpoise 
Built specifically for duty with the United States Exploring Squadron under 
Lt. Charles Wilkes, the brig USS Porpoise was later employed in anti- 
slave trade patrols off Africa and other exploration duties. She disappeared 
in the South China Sea in September 1 853. NHC NH-63630 



USS Intrepid 
The Steam Torpedo Ram Intrepid was one of several experimental vessels 
built by the Navy in the 1 870s. In this view, taken in a dry dock, note the 
attachment for the ship's spar torpedo at the base of the bow. Like most 
experimental ships, the iron-hulled vessel spent more time out of service 
than in active use. NHC NH-53251 




USS Winooski 
The double-end sidewheel gunboat USS Winooski was completed too late 
to see Civil War service. NHC NH-43863 




USS Wachusett 
The screw sloop USS Wachusett is shown drying her sails while tied up at the Navy Yard's Shear Wharf on December 22, 1 874. To the left is the 
Shiphouse (Building 92) erected in 1 872 over the yard's original shipbuilding ways for the construction of USS Intrepid. To the right is the Carpenters & 
Joiners Shop (Building 24). The yard's A-frame masting shears appear through the ship's rigging, as does the chimney of the Dry Dock Pump House 
(Building 22). BOSTS-14582 



II 62 



Appendix B, Ships Built By The Navy Yard 



Name 


Type 


Hull No. 


Keel Laid 


Launched 


Commissioned Fate 


Eugene A. Greene 


Escort Vessel 


DE-549 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


Evarts 


Escort Vessel 


DE-5 


1942 Oct 17 


1942 Dec 7 


1943 Apr 15 


Ex-BDE-5 (1943): sold 1947 


Everett F. Larson 


Escort Vessel 


DE-554 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


Falmouth 


Sloop-of-War(18) 


— 


1827 Mar 


1827 Nov 3 


1828 Jan 20 


Sold 1863 


Fitch 


Destroyer 


DD-462 


1941 Jan 6 


1941 Jun 14 


1942 Feb 3 


Reclassified DMS-25 (1944- 
1955); sunk as target 1973 


Fleming 


Escort Vessel 


DE-271 


1943 Apr 7 


1943 May 19 


1945 Aug 20' 1 


Loaned to Britain 1943-1945; 
named Garlies (1945); sold 
1947 


Foley, see Gillette 














Forrest 


Destroyer 


DD-461 


1941 Jan 6 


1941 Jun 14 


1942 Jan 13 


Reclassified DMS-24 (1944); 
sold 1946 


Fort Mandan 


Dock Landing Ship 


LSD-21 


1944 Dec 16 


1945 Jun 2 


1945 Oct 31 


Transferred to Greece 1971 


Fullam 


Destroyer 


DD-474 


1941 Dec 10 


1942 Apr 16 


1943 Mar 2 


Sunk as target 1962 


Garlies. see Fleming 














Genesee 


Sidewheel Gunboat 


— 


1861 Dec 6 


1862 Apr 2 


1862 Jul 3 


Sold 1867 


George 


Escort Vessel 


DE-276 


1943 May 20 


1943 Jul 8 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


Geronimo. see Harboi 


■Tug No. //3(YT-119) 












Gillette 


Escort Vessel 


DE-270 


1943 Apr 7 


1943 May 19 


1945 Aug 22" 


Loaned to Britain 1943-1945; 
named Foley (1945); sold 
1946 


Grampus 


Submarine 


SS-523 


1944 Feb 8 


1944 Dec 15 


1949 Oct 26 


Transferred to Brazil 1972 


Grenadier 


Submarine 


SS-525 


1944 Feb 8 


1944 Dec 15 


1951 Feb 10 


Transferred to Venezuela 1973 


Grindall, see Sanders 














Griswold 


Escort Vessel 


DE-7 


1942 Nov 27 


1943 Jan 9 


1943 Apr 28 


Ex-BDE7 (1943); sold 1946 


Groves 


Escort Vessel 


DE-543 


1943 Dec 9 


1944 Jan 27 


Never 


Cancelled 1944; scrapped 


Guerriere 


Screw Frigate 


— 


1864 Aug 5 


1865 Sep 9 


1867 May 21 


Sold 1872 


Guest 


Destroyer 


DD-472 


1941 Sep 27 


1942 Feb 20 


1942 Dec 15 


Transferred to Brazil 1959 


Gwin 


Destroyer 


DD-433 


1939 Jun 1 


1940 May 25 


1941 Jan 15 


Lost 1943 


Gyatt 


Escort Vessel 


DE-550 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


Hall 


Destroyer 


DD-583 


1942 Apr 16 


1942 Jul 18 


1943 Jun 8 


Transferred to Greece 1960 


Halligan 


Destroyer 


DD-584 


1942 Nov 9 


1943 Mar 19 


1943 Aug 19 


Lost 1945 


Haraden 


Destroyer 


DD-585 


1942 Nov 9 


1943 Mar 19 


1943 Sep 16 


Sunk as target 1973 


Harbor Tug No. 119 


Harbor Tug 


YT-119 


1932 Jun 


1933 Jan 15 


1933 Mar 7 


Named Geronimo { 1938); reclas- 
sified YTM-119 (1944); sold 
1948 


Harold J. Ellison 


Escort Vessel 


DE-545 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


Hartford 


Screw Sloop 


IX- 13 


1858 Jan 1 


1858 Nov 22 


1859 May 27 


Lost 1956 


Hercules, see Oregon 














Herzog 


Escort Vessel 


DE-277 


1943 May 20 


1943 Jul 8 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


Heywood L. Edwards 


Destroyer 


DD-663 


1943 Jul4 


1943 Oct 6 


1944 Jan 26 


Transferred to Japan 1959 


Hoste, see No Name (DE-521) 












Housatonic 


Screw Sloop 


— 


1861 May 30 


1861 Nov 20 


1862 Aug 29 


Lost 1864 


Howard F Clark 


Escort Vessel 


DE-533 


1943 Oct 8 


1943 Nov 8 


1944 May 25 


Sold 1973 


Hudson 


Destroyer 


DD-475 


1942 Feb 20 


1942 Jun 3 


1943 Apr 13 


Sold 1973 


Humboldt 


Small Seaplane Tender 


AVP-21 


1940 Sep 6 


1941 Mar 17 


1941 Oct 7 


Reclassified AG- 121 (1945); 
reclassified AVP-21 (1945); 
transferred to U.S. Coast 
Guard 1949 


Hutchins 


Destroyer 


DD-476 


1941 Sep 27 


1942 Feb 20 


1942 Nov 17 


Sold 1948 


Independence 


Ship-of-the-Line (74)'" 


— 


1813 May 


1814 Jun 22 


1815 Jul 3 


Sold 1913 


Intrepid 


Steam Torpedo Ram 


— 


1873 


1874 Mar 5 


1874 Jul 31 


Sold 1892 


Iowa, see Ammonoosuc 












John Hancock 


Steam Cutter 


— 


1849 

1852 Oct 15" 


1850 Oct 26 
1853 Feb 24 


1851 Sep 6 
1853 Mar 19 


Sold 1865 


John J. Powers 


Escort Vessel 


DE-528 


1943 Sep 25 


1943 Nov 2 


1944 Feb 29 


Sold 1946 


John M. Bermingham 


Escort Vessel 


DE-530 


1943 Oct 14 


1943 Nov 17 


1944 Apr 8 


Sold 1946 


Kenneth D. Bailey 


Escort Vessel 


DE-552 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 



Placed in U.S. Navy service on return from loan to Great Britain; retained Royal Navy names Curlirsum] holey, respectively. 

" Rebuilt as Frigate (54) in Dry Dock 1 between 1835 Jul 28 and 1836 Aug 19. 

1 Date near-total rebuilding begun. Some sources consider the rebuilt vessel to be a separate ship from the original. 



1163 



Lharlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Name 


Type 


Hull No. 


Keel Laid 


Launched 


Commissioned Fate 


Keywadin, see 


Pennsylvania 












Kingsmili see 


No Name (DE-280) 












Knight 


Destroyer 


DD-633 


1941 Mar 18 


1941 Sep 27 


1942 Jun 22 


Reclassified DMS-40 (1945- 
1955): sunk as target 1967 


Lancet fish' 


Submarine 


SS-296 


1942 Dec 15 


1943 Aug 15 


1945 Feb 12 


Sold 1959 


Lansdale 


Destroyer 


DD-426 


1938 Dec 19 


1939 Oct 30 


1940 Sep 17 


Lost 1944 


Lewis 


Escort Vessel 


DE-535 


1943 Nov 3 


1943 Dec 7 


1944 Sep 5 


Sunk as target 1966 


Ling 2 


Submarine 


SS-297 


1942 Nov 2 


1943 Aug 15 


1945 Jun 8 


Reclassified AGSS-297 (1962); 
reclassified IXSS-297 (1971); 
preserved as memorial 1972 


Love ring 


Escort Vessel 


DE-272 


1943 Apr 23 


1943 Jun 4 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


Macdonough 


Destroyer 


DD-351 


1933 May 15 


1934 Aug 22 


1935 Mar 15 


Sold 1946 


Madison 


Destroyer 


DD-425 


1938 Sep 19 


1939 Oct 20 


1940 Aug 6 


Sunk as target 1969 


Manitou 


Screw Sloop 


— 


1864 Nov 30 


1866 Aug 25 


1871 Feb 27 


Renamed Worcester { 1869); sold 

1883 
Transferred to Haiti 1868 


Maratanza 


Sidewheel Gunboat 





1861 Aug 31 


1861 Nov 26 


1862 Apr 20 


Marion 


Sloop-of-War (16) 


— 


1839 


1839 Apr 24 


1839 Oct 4 


Scrapped 1871 


Marlboro 


Barracks Ship 


APB-38 


1944 Aug 25 


1944 Nov 17 


1945 Aug 18 


Ex-APL-38 (1944): scrapped 

1965 
Sold 1947 


Mason 


Escort Vessel 


DE-529 


1943 Oct 14 


1943 Nov 17 


1944 Mar 20 


Matagorda 


Small Seaplane Tender 


AVP-22 


1940 Sep 6 


1941 Mar 18 


1941 Dec 16 


Reclassified AG-122 (1945); 
reclassified AVP-22 (1945); 
transferred to U.S. Coast 
Guard 1949 


Mayrant 


Destroyer 


DD-402 


1937 Apr 15 


1938 May 14 


1939 Sep 19 


Scuttled 1948 


Meeker County see No Name (LST-980) 












Mercer 


Barracks Ship 


APB-39 


1944 Aug 25 


1944 Nov 17 


1945 Sep 19 


Ex-APL-39 (1944); reclassified 
IX-502 (1975); reclassified 
APL-39 (2001); active USN 
2008 


Meredith 


Destroyer 


DD-434 


1939 Jun 1 


1940 Apr 24 


1941 Mar 1 


Lost 1942 


Meredosia 


Screw Sloop 


— 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1866 


Merrimack 


Screw Frigate 


— 


1854 Jul 11 


1855 Jun 15 


1856 Feb 20 


Lost 1861 



Middlesex County see No Name (LST-983) 
Millard County see No Name (LST-987) 
Mineral County, see No Name (LST-988) 



Monadnock 


Monitor 


— 


1862 Aug 


1863 Mar 23 


1864 Oct 4 


Scrapped 1874 


Monaghan 


Destroyer 


DD-354 


1933 Nov 21 


1935 Jan 9 


1935 Apr 19 


Lost 1944 


Monmouth County, 


see No Name (LST-1032) 












Mugford 


Destroyer 


DD-389 


1935 Oct 28 


1936 Oct 31 


1937 Aug 16 


Scuttled 1948 


Myles C. Fox 


Escort Vessel 


DE-546 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


Nantasket 


Screw Sloop 


— 


1865 Sep 14 


1867 Aug 15 


1869 Oct 22 


Scrapped 1876 


Narragansett 


Screw Sloop 


— 


1858 Aug 3 


1859 Feb 15 


1859 Nov 6 


Sold 1883 


Neches 


Fuel Ship No. 17 


AO-5 


1919 Jun 28 


1920 Jun 2 


1920 Oct 25 


Lost 1942 


Newcomb 


Destroyer 


DD-586 


1943 Mar 19 


1943 Jul 4 


1943 Nov 10 


Scrapped 1947 


Nicholson 


Destroyer 


DD-442 


1939 Nov 1 


1940 May 31 


1941 Jun 3 


Transferred to Italy 1951 


No Name" 


Barracks Ship 


APL-11 


1944 Aug 5 


1944 Sep 4 


1944 Oct 10 


Sunk as target 1974 


No Name 13 


Barracks Ship 


APL-12 


1944 Aug 5 


1944 Sep 4 


1944 Sep 24 


Stricken 1946 


No Name 


Barracks Ship 


APL-13 


1944 Sep 5 


1944 Oct 12 


1944 Nov 20 


Stricken 1946 


No Name 13 


Barracks Ship 


APL-32 


1944 Sep 5 


1944 Oct 12 


1945 Jan 11 


Active USN 2008 


No Name 


Barracks Ship 


APL-33 


1944 Nov 18 


1945 Jan 1 


1945 Apr 5 


Stricken 1946 


No Name 


Barracks Ship 


APL-34 


1944 Nov 18 


1945 Jan 1 


1945 Apr 5 


Stricken 1993 



No Name (APL-35), see Benewah 
No Name (APL-36), see Colleton 
No Name (APL-37). see Echols 
No Name (APL-38), see Marlboro 
No Name (APL-39). see Mercer 
No Name (APL-40). see Nueces 



Built by Cramp Shipbuilding (Hull Nos. 551-552). Philadelphia. Pa.; transferred to Navy Yard for completion 1944 May 19 and 1944 May 11. respectively Two 
additional submarines / ionfish (SS-298) and Manta (SS-299) — built by Cramp (Hull Nos. 553-554) were originally transferred to Boston for completion 1944 Mar but 
were reassigned to the Portsmouth Navy Yard a month later. 

1 ' Informally named The New Yorker. Billmore. and Slatler. respectively, during World War II service. 



1164 



Appendix B, Ships Built By The Navy Yard 

Ships Built In The 20th Century: A Gallery 





USSBen/7/on(DD-662) 

In accordance with Bureau of Ships' instructions, yard photographers took 
pictures of new and converted vessels "in stream" in Boston Harbor. This 
view shows the Fletcher-c\ass destroyer USS Bennion in camouflage paint 
on February 29, 1944. BOSTS-10424 







■dlnift 


A 


■ 










|| 






u*i* 




•,;,• ^.^^ ^ 




■^ 


^d^b 


E^^ 


^^r 




USS Cow/e (DD-632) 
Having been equipped with a hammerhead crane, Pier 6 was one of the 
yard's principal ship construction piers during World War II. This view of 
the Bristol-c\ass destroyer USS Cowie was taken on July 4, 1942, ap- 
proximately a month after her commissioning. BOSTS-10825 



USS Donner (LSD-20) 
The dock landing ship USS Donner is seen in Boston Harbor while on 
trials on July 22, 1945, nine days before her commissioning. The LSDs 
were the largest warships built by the yard. BOSTS-10966 





Echols (APB-37) 
The self-propelled barracks ship Echoic is seen at Pier 6 West on January 
8, 1947, one week after her official completion. She would remain in re- 
serve status for the next fourteen years before being activated to berth 
crews at the Navy's submarine base at New London, Ct. BOSTS-11020 



USS Evarts (DE-5) 
The need of the Navy for anti-submarine convoy escorts was so great that 
seven of the twelve escort vessels laid down by the Navy Yard in 1 942 for 
the British under the Lend-Lease Act were retained by the United States. 
The first of these ships, USS Evarts, is seen in Boston Harbor on April 1 9, 
1943, four days after her commissioning. BOSTS-11075 



USS Grenadier (SS-525) 
One of only four submarines constructed by the Navy Yard, USS Grena- 
d/erwas suspended at the end of World War II and later completed to a 
more modern design. She is seen here while on post-commissioning trials 
on May 15, 1951. BOSTS-11281 




- U65 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 
Ships Built In The 20th Century: A Gallery 




USS Gwin (DD-433) 
Still in peacetime paint, the G/eai/es-class destroyer USS Gwin is seen in 
Boston Harbor on March 27, 1941. Damaged beyond repair by Japanese 
forces off Kolombangara on July 1 3, 1 943, she was scuttled by torpedoes 
from fellow Boston-built destroyer USS Ralph Talbot (DD-390). 

BOSTS-11302 




USS Lansdale (DD-426) 
Although broadside and bow views are the most commonly seen in-stream 
photographs, all angles of a ship were covered. This view shows the stern 
of USS Lansdale on October 14, 1940. The Benson-class destroyer was 
sunk by German aircraft off Algeria on April 20, 1 944. BOSTS-11746 



USS Madison (DD-425) 
Commemorative Cachet 
Commemorative cachets were issued for vari- 
ous ceremonial occasions in a ship's life, both 
as souvenirs and to raise money for chari- 
table causes. This cachet was issued by the 
Navy Relief Society for the combined chris- 
tening and commissioning ceremonies for the 
destroyer USS Madison (DD-425). 

BOSTS-11892 




USS John J. Powers (DE-528) 
Named for Lt. John J. Powers, a naval aviator who received a posthumous 
Medal of Honor for his actions at the Battle of the Coral Sea in May 1942, 
USS John J. Powers is seen in Boston Harbor on April 27, 1944. 

BOSTS-11528 

USS Knight (DD-633) 
USS Knight is seen at Pier 6 East on October 3, 1942, shortly before 
leaving Boston for Norfolk to join the forces preparing for Operation Torch, 
the invasion of North Africa. BOSTS-11671 




USS Monaghan (DD-354) 
The second destroyer to be constructed by the yard, USS Monaghan was 
built in Dry Dock 2 and then transferred to Dry Dock 1 for completion. She 
is seen here in the latter facility in early 1 935. Portal Crane 1 2 and Building 
5 can be seen in the background at left. BOSTS-13655 



1166- 



Appendix B, Ships Built By The Navy Yard 

Ships Built In The 20th Century: A Gallery 




USS,4PL-77(APL-11) 
The non-self-propelled barracks ship APL-1 1 is seen on October 4, 1944. 
Assigned to the Pacific, she would bear the unofficial name The New Yorker. 

BOSTS-10120 



USS LST-305 (LST-305) 
The hull of USS LST-305 enters the waters of Boston Harbor during her 
launching from Shipways 2 on October 1 0, 1 942. Commissioned on De- 
cember 6, 1 942, she was transferred to the Royal Navy the next day. HMS 
LST-305 was lost to an Axis submarine off Anzio on February 20, 1 944. 

BOSTS-11696 




USSLST-985(LST-985) 
Tank landing ships saw heavy service in both European and Pacific the- 
aters during World War II, as evidenced by this view of USS LST-985 
entering San Francisco Bay in late 1 945 or early 1 946. NHC NH-83648 



USS Pecos (AO-6) 
The last of three oilers constructed by the Navy Yard, USS Pecos is seen 
on September 26, 1 921 . The Customs House Tower, Boston's first sky- 
scraper, can be seen in the background. BOSTS-13923 




USS Suffolk County (LST-1 1 73) 
The last warship built by the Navy Yard, USS Suffolk County was named 
for the county in which the yard is located. This aerial view of her under- 
way at speed was probably taken around the time of her completion in the 
summer of 1957. BOSTS-14315 




USS Rizzi (DE-537) 

USS Rizzi is seen in Boston Harbor on July 10,1 945. Completed too late 
for service in World War II, she was briefly employed as a training ship 
before being decommissioned in 1946. She served a second term as a 
reserve training ship between 1951 and 1958. BOSTS-14095 



USS Tortuga (LSD-26) 
This photograph of USS Tortuga 
in Boston Harbor on June 4, 1 945, 
provides a clear view of the stern 
gate to the vessel's well deck, 
which enabled landing craft to be 
floated off. BOSTS-14459 




H67 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Name 



Type 



Hull No. 



Keel Laid 



Launched 



Commissioned Fate 



No Name (ATL-301). 


see No Name (LST-301) 


No Name (ATL-302), 


see No Name (LST-302) 


No Name (ATL-303), 


see No Name (LST-303) 


No Name (ATL-304), 


see No Name (LST-304) 


No Name (ATL-305), 


see No Name (LST-305) 


NoName(ATL-306), 


see No Name (LST-306) 


NoName(ATL-307), 


see No Name (LST-307) 


No Name (ATL-308), 


see No Name (LST-308) 


No Name (ATL- 309), 


see No Name (LST-309) 


NoName(ATL-310), 


see No Name (LST-310) 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name (BDE-5), see Evarts 


No Name (BDE-6). see Wyffels 


No Name (BDE-7), see Griswold 


No Name (BDE-8). see Steele 


No Name (BDE-9), see Carlson 


No Name (BDE-10), 


see Bebas 


No Name (BDE-11), 


see Crouter 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Destroyer 


No Name 


Destroyer 


No Name 


Destroyer 


No Name 


Destroyer 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 


No Name 


Escort Vessel 



BDE-1 



BDE-2 



BDE-3 
BDE-4 



1942 Apr 5 1942 Jun 27 1945 Aug 22 14 Loaned to Britain 1943-1945: 

named Bayntun (1945); sold 

1947 
1942 Apr 5 1942 Jun 27 1945 Aug 20 M Loaned to Britain 1943-1945; 

named Bazely (1945); 

scrapped 1946 
1942 Sep 22 1942 Nov 23 Never Transferred to Britain 1943 

1942 Sep 22 1942 Nov 23 Never Transferred to Britain 1943 



BDE-12 


1942 Dec 8 


1943 Jan 


26 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


DD-905 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1945 


DD-906 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1945 


DD-907 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1945 


DD-908 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1945 


DE-280 


1943 Jul 9 


1943 Aug 


13 


1945 Aug 26 14 


Loaned to Britain 1943-1945: 
named Kingsmill (1945); sold 
1947 


DE-425 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DE-426 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DE-427 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DE-428 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DE-429 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DE-430 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DE-431 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DE-432 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DE-433 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DE-434 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DE-435 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DE-436 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DE-437 


Never 


Never 




Never 


Cancelled 1944 


DE-516 


1943 Jul 9 


1943 Aug 


13 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


DE-517 


1943 Jul 9 


1943 Aug 


13 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


DE-518 


1943 Jul 9 


1943 Aug 


13 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


DE-519 


1943 Jul 18 


1943 Aug 


30 


1945 Aug 20 M 


Loaned to Britain 1943-1945; 
named Pasley (1945); sold 
1945 


DE-520 


1943 Jul 18 


1943 Aug 


30 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


DE-521 


1943 Aug 14 


1943 Sep 


24 


1945 Aug 22 14 


Loaned to Britain 1943-1945: 
named Hoste (1945): sold 
1946 


DE-522 


1943 Aug 14 


1943 Sep 


24 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


DE-523 


1943 Aug 14 


1943 Sep 


24 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


DE-524 


1943 Aug 14 


1943 Sep 


24 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


DE-525 


1943 Sep 25 


1943 Nov 


2 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1944 


DE-526 


1943 Sep 25 


1943 Nov 2 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1944 



Placed in U.S. Navy service on return from loan to Great Britain; retained Royal Navy names Bayntun, Bazely, Kingsmill. Pasley, and Hoste, respectively. 



1168 



Ships Built By The Navy Yard 



Type 



Hull No. 



Keel Laid 



Launched 



Commissioned Fate 



Escort Vessel 


DE-558 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Escort Vessel 


DE-559 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Escort Vessel 


DE-560 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Escort Vessel 


DE-561 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Escort Vessel 


DE-562 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Escort Vessel 


DE-801 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Escort Vessel 


DE-802 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Escort Vessel 


DE-803 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-301 


1942Jun26 


1942 Sep 15 


1942 Nov 1 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-302 


1942 Jun27 


1942 Sep 15 


1942 Nov 10 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-303 


1942 Jul 3 


1942 Sep 15 


1942 Nov 20 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-304 


1942 Jul 3 


1942 Sep 15 


1942 Nov 29 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-305 


1942 Jul 24 


1942 Oct 10 


1942 Dec 6 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-306 


1942 Jul 24 


1942 Oct 10 


1942 Dec 11 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-307 


1942 Sep 15 


1942 Nov 9 


1942 Dec 23 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-308 


1942 Sep 15 


1942 Nov 9 


1943 Jan 2 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-309 


1942 Sep 22 


1942 Nov 23 


1943 Jan 20 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-310 


1942 Sep 22 


1942 Nov 23 


1943 Jan 20 



Tank Landing Ship 


LST-980 


1943 Dec 9 


1944 Jan 27 


1944 Feb 26 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-981 


1943 Dec 9 


1944 Jan 27 


1944 Mar 11 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-982 


1943 Dec 22 


1944 Feb 10 


1944 Mar 19 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-983 


1943 Dec 22 


1944 Feb 10 


1944 Mar 25 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-984 


1944 Jan 3 


1944 Feb 25 


1944 Apr 1 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-985 


1944 Jan 3 


1944 Feb 25 


1944 Apr 7 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-986 


1944 Jan 15 


1944 Mar 5 


1944 Apr 14 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-987 


1944 Feb 2 


1944 Mar 5 


1944 Apr 19 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-988 


1944 Feb 10 


1944 Mar 12 


1944 Apr 25 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-989 


1944 Feb 10 


1944 Mar 12 


1944 Apr 28 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-990 


1944 Feb 26 


1944 Mar 27 


1944 May 1 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-991 


1944 Feb 26 


1944 Mar 27 


1944 May 6 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-992 


1944 Mar 5 


1944 Apr 7 


1944 May 10 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-993 


1944 Mar 5 


1944 Apr 7 


1944 May 12 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-994 


1944 Mar 12 


1944 Apr 17 


1944 May 17 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-995 


1944 Mar 12 


1944 Apr 17 


1944 May 20 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-996 


1944 Mar 27 


1944 May 2 


1944 May 23 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-997 


1944 Mar 27 


1944 May 2 


1944 May 27 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-998 


1944 Apr 8 


1944 May 14 


1944 May 29 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-999 


1944 Apr 8 


1944 May 14 


1944 May 30 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1000 


1944 Apr 18 


1944 May 26 


1944 Jun 14 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1001 


1944 Apr 18 


1944 May 26 


1944 Jun 20 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1002 


1944 May 3 


1944 Jun 8 


1944 Jun 25 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1003 


1944 May 3 


1944 Jun 8 


1944 Jun 29 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1028 


1944 May 15 


1944 Jun 18 


1944 Jul 7 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1029 


1944 May 15 


1944 Jun 18 


1944 Jul 13 



Cancelled 1944 
Cancelled 1944 
Cancelled 1944 
Cancelled 1944 
Cancelled 1944 
Cancelled 1943 
Cancelled 1943 
Cancelled 1943 
Ex-ATL-301 (1942); transferred 

to Britain 1942 
Ex-ATL-302 (1942): transferred 

to Britain 1942 
Ex-ATL-303 (1942); transferred 

to Britain 1942 
Ex-ATL-304 (1942); transferred 

to Britain 1942 
Ex-ATL-305 (1942); transferred 

to Britain 1942 
Ex-ATL-306 (1942); named 

Bernalillo County (1955); 

sold 1959 
Ex-ATL-307 (1942); sold 1948 
Ex-ATL-308 (1942); sold 1947 
Ex-ATL-309 (1942); sold 1947 
Ex-ATL-310 (1942); name 

Aeolus assigned/cancelled 

1945; reclassified ARL-42 

(1945); reclassified LST-310 

(1945); sold 1947 
Named Meeker County (1955); 

sold 1975 
Sold 1947 
Sold 1947 
Named Middlesex County 

(1955); transferred to Indo- 
nesia 1975 
Sold 1948 
Sold 1947 
Sold 1948 
Named Millard County (1955): 

transferred to Cermany 1961 
Named Mineral County (1955) ; 

sunk as target 1957 
Sold 1948 
Sold 1947 
Sold 1946 
Sold 1948 

Transferred to China 1948 
Sold 1947 
Sold 1947 
Sold 1947 
Sold 1948 
Sold 1948 
Sold 1947 
Sold 1948 
Sold 1947 
Stricken 1946 
Named Cotonis (1944): reel, is 

sifted ARL-10 (1944); stricken 

1961 
Sold 1947 
Sold 1946 



1169 - 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Name 



Type 



Hull No. 



Keel Laid 



Launched 



Commissioned Fate 



No Name 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1030 


1944 May 27 


1944 Jun 25 


1944 Jul 19 


No Name 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1031 


1944 May 27 


1944 Jun 25 


1944 Jul 25 


No Name 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1032 


1944 Jun 9 


1944 Jul 9 


1944 Aug 1 


No Name 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1033 


1944 Jun 9 


1944 Jul 9 


1944 Aug 12 


No Name 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1034 


1944 Jun 26 


1944 Aug 4 


1944 Aug 26 


No Name 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1035 


1944 Jun 26 


1944 Aug 4 


1944 Sep 1 


No Name 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1036 


1944 Jul 10 


1944 Aug 24 


1944 Sep 15 


No Name 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1037 


1944 Jul 10 


1944 Aug 24 


1944 Sep 22 


No Name 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1153 


1945 Jul 19 


1947 Apr 24 


1947 Sep 3 


No Name 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1154 


1945 Aug 4 


1946 Jul 19 


1949 May 24 


No Name 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1155 


Never 


Never 


Never 


No Name 


Submarine 


SS-537 


Never 


Never 


Never 


No Name 


Submarine 


SS-538 


Never 


Never 


Never 


No Name 


Submarine 


SS-539 


Never 


Never 


Never 


No Name 


Submarine 


SS-540 


Never 


Never 


Never 


No Name 


Submarine 


SS-541 


Never 


Never 


Never 


No Name 


Submarine 


SS-542 


Never 


Never 


Never 


No Name 


Submarine 


SS-543 


Never 


Never 


Never 


No Name 


Submarine 


SS-544 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Nueces 


Barracks Ship 


APB-40 


1945 Jan 2 


1945 May 6 


1945 Nov 30 



O 'Brien 
O 'Toole 
O Toole 
Oregon 



Transferred to China 1948 

Sold 1947 

Named Monmouth County 
(1955): sold 1971 

Reclassified LSTH-1033 
(1945); transferred to China 
1947 

Sold 1946 

Sold 1947 

Named Creon (1944): reclassi- 
fied ARL- 11 (1944); sold 1961 

Named Poseidon (1944); reclas- 
sified ARL-12 (1944): sold 
1961 

Named Talbot County (1955); 
sold 1974 

Named Tallahatchie County 
(1955); reclassified AVB-2 
(1962): sold 1970 

Cancelled 1946 

Cancelled 1944 

Cancelled 1944 

Cancelled 1944 

Cancelled 1944 

Cancelled 1944 

Cancelled 1944 

Cancelled 1944 

Cancelled 1944 

Ex-APL-40 (1944); reclassified 
IX-503 (1975): reclassified 
APL-40 (2001): active USN 
2008 



Destroyer 
Escort Vessel 
Escort Vessel 
Monitor 



Osberg Escort Vessel 

Oswald A. Powers Escort Vessel 
Pasley, see No Name (DE-519) 
Patapsco^ Tug No. 10 

Pecos Fuel Ship No. 

Pennsylvania Screw Frigate 



Pen tucket 

Pequot 

PickereF 

Pioneer 
Plymouth 



Tug No. 8 
Screw Gunboat 
Submarine 
Brig (6) 
Sloop-of-War (20) 



DD-415 


1938 May 31 


1939 Oct 20 


1940 Mar 2 


Lost 1942 


DE-274 


1943 May 20 


1943 Jul 8 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


DE-527 


1943 Sep 25 


1943 Nov 2 


1944 Jan 22 


Sold 1946 




1864 Apr 15 


Never 


Never 


Ex- Hercules (1869): ex-Quin- 
sigamond (1869); scrapped 
1884 


DE-538 


1943 Nov 3 


1943 Dec 7 


1945 Dec 10 


Sold 1974 


DE-542 


1943 Nov 18 


1943 Dec 17 


Never 


Cancelled 1946: scrapped 


AT 10 


1907 May 12 


1908 Jun 29 


1911 Jul 1 


Sold 1936 


AO-6 


1920 Jun 2 


1921 Apr 23 


1921 Aug 25 


Lost 1942 


— 


1865 


Never 


Never 


Ex-Keywadin (1869): scrapped 
1884 


YT-8 


1903 Jan 29 


1903 Jul 16 


1911 Jul 1 


Sold 1937 


— 


1862 Oct 18 


1863 Jun 4 


1864 Jan 15 


Lransferred to Haiti 1869 


SS-524 


1944 Feb 8 


1944 Dec 15 


1949 Apr 4 


Transferred to Italy 1972 


— 


1836 


1836 Oct 29 


1836 Dec 24 


Sold 1844 


— 


1843 Jun 17 


1843 Nov 11 


1844 Apr 3 


Lost 1861 



Pompanoosuc, see Connecticut 
Porpoise Brig (10) 

Poseidon, see No Name (LST-1037) 
Powhatan Harbor Tug 

Princeton Screw Steamer 

Quinsigamond, see Hercules 
Ralph Talbot Destroyer 

Reybold Escort Vessel 

Richard P. Leary Destroyei 



YT-128 



1836 Jan 24 1836 May 31 
1938 Mar 28 1938 Jun 10 



1851 Jun 



1851 Oct 29 



DD-390 


1935 Oct 28 


1936 Oct 31 


DE-275 


1943 May 20 


1943 Jul 8 


DD-664 


1943 Jul 4 


1943 Oct 6 



1836 Aug 25 Lost 1854 

1938 Sep 16 Reclassified YTM-128 (1944); 

stricken 1971 

1852 May 18 Sold 1866 

1937 Oct 14 Scuttled 1948 

Never Transferred to Britain 1943 

1944 Feb 23 Transferred to Japan 1959 



1 Built by Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Me; transferred to Navy Yard for completion 190!) lul 
' Reassigned to Portsmouth Navj Yard for completion 1945 Sep 27 when G2 percenl complete. 



1170 



Appendix B, Ships Built By The Navy Yard 



Name 


Type 


Hull No. 


Keel Laid 


Launched 


Commissioned Fate 


Rizzi 


Escort Vessel 


DE-537 


1943 Nov 3 


1943 Dec 7 


1945 Jun 26 


Sold 1974 


Rogers Blood 


Escort Vessel 


DE-555 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


Saco 


Screw Gunboat 


— 


1863 Jan 15 


1863 Aug 28 


1864 Jul 11 


Sold 1883 


Sagamore* 1 


Tug No. 20 


AT- 20 


1917 


1917 


1918 Jun 18 


Ex- Comanche (1917); reclassi- 
fied ATO-20 (1944); stricken 
1947 


Sanders 


Escort Vessel 


DE-273 


1943 Apr 23 


1943 Jun 4 


1945 Aug 20'" 


Loaned to Britain 1943-1945; 
named Grindall (1945); 
scrapped 1946 


Sea Panther 


Submarine 


SS-528 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


Seid 


Escort Vessel 


DE-256 


1943 Jan 10 


1943 Feb 22 


1943 Jun 11 


Sold 1947 


Serapis 


Screw Sloop 


— 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1866 


Sheehan 


Escort Vessel 


DE-541 


1943 Nov 8 


1943 Dec 17 


Never 


Cancelled 1946; scrapped 


Silverstein 


Escort Vessel 


DE-534 


1943 Oct 8 


1943 Nov 8 


1944 Jul 14 


Sold 1973 


Smartt 


Escort Vessel 


DE-257 


1943 Jan 10 


1943 Feb 22 


1943 Jun 18 


Sold 1946 


Stader, see No Name (APL-32) 












Steele 


Escort Vessel 


DE-8 


1942 Nov 27 


1943 Jan 9 


1943 May 4 


Ex-BDE-8 (1943); sold 1946 


Suffolk County 


Tank Landing Ship 


LST-1173 


1955 Jul 17 


1956 Sep 5 


1957 Aug 15 


Stricken 1989 


Talbot County, see No Name (LST-1153) 












Tallahatchie County, see No Name (LST-1154) 












Tallapoosa 


Sidewheel Gunboat 


— 


1862 Aug 8 


1863 Feb 17 


1864 Sep 13 


Sold 1892 


The New Yorker, see N 


oName (APL-11) 












Tibourn 


Submarine 


SS-529 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


Tioga 


Sidewheel Gunboat 


— 


1861 Dec 7 


1862 Apr 18 


1862 Jun 30 


Sold 1867 


Tisdale 


Escort Vessel 


DE-278 


1943 Jun 5 


1943 Jul 17 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


Tortuga 


Dock Landing Ship 


LSD-26 


1944 Oct 16 


1945 Jan 21 


1945 Jun 8 


Stricken 1976 


Trippe 


Destroyer 


DD-403 


1937 Apr 15 


1938 May 14 


1939 Nov 1 


Scuttled 1948 


Trumpeter 


Escort Vessel 


DE-279 


1943 Jun 5 


1943 Jul 17 


1945 Aug 20 18 


Loaned to Britain 1943-1945; 
named Kempthorne (1945); 
sold 1946 


Tweedy 


Escort Vessel 


DE-532 


1943 Aug 31 


1943 Oct 7 


1944 Feb 12 


Sunk as target 1970 


Vandalia 


Screw Sloop 


— 


1872 


1874 Oct 23 


1876 Jan 10 


Lost 1889 


Vandivier 


Escort Vessel 


DE-540 


1943 Nov 8 


1943 Dec 27 


1955 Oct 11 


Reclassified DER-540 (1954); 
sunk as target 1974 


Vermont, see Virginia 














Vermont 


Ship-of-the-Line (74) 


— 


1818 Nov 


1848 Sep 15 


1862 Jan 30 


Ex-Virginia (1827); sold 1902 


Virginia, see Vermont 














Virginia 


Ship-of-the-Line (74) 


— 


1822 May 13 


Never 


Never 


Ex- Vermont (1827); scrapped 

1884 
Sold 1887 


Wachusett 


Screw Sloop 





1861 Jun 26 


1861 Oct 10 


1862 Mar 2 


Wagner 


Escort Vessel 


DE-539 


1943 Nov 8 


1943 Dec 27 


1955 Nov 22 


Reclassified DER-539 (1954); 
scrapped 1977 


Walke 


Destroyer 


DD-416 


1938 May 31 


1939 Oct 20 


1940 Apr 27 


Lost 1942 


Walter S. Brown 


Escort Vessel 


DE-258 


1943 Jan 10 


1943 Feb 22 


1943 Jun 25 


Scrapped 1946 


Warren 


Sloop-of-War (18) 


— 


1826 Jun 1 


1826 Nov 29 


1827 Feb 22 


Sold 1863 


Whetstone 


Dock Landing Ship 


LSD-27 


1945 Apr 7 


1945 Jul 18 


1946 Feb 12 


Stricken 1976 


Whitney 


Destroyer Tender No. 4 


AD-4 


1921 Apr 23 


1923 Oct 12 


1924 Sep 2 


Sold 1948 


Wilkes 


Destroyer 


DD-441 


1939 Nov 1 


1940 May 31 


1941 Apr 22 


Sold 1972 


William C. Miller 


Escort Vessel 


DE-259 


1943 Jan 10 


1943 Feb 22 


1943 Jul 2 


Sold 1947 


William M. Wood 


Escort Vessel 


DE-557 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


William R. Rush 


Escort Vessel 


DE-556 


Never 


Never 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 


Winooski 


Sidewheel Gunboat 


— 


1863 Feb 20 


1863 Jul 30 


1865 Jun 27 


Sold 1868 


Wintle 


Escort Vessel 


DE-266 


1943 Mar 11 


1943 Apr 22 


Never 


Transferred to Britain 1943 


Worcester, see Manitou 












Wyffels 


Escort Vessel 


DE-6 


1942 Oct 17 


1942 Dec 7 


1943 Apr 15 


Ex-BDE-6 (1943); transferred to 
China 1945 



17 Built by American Ship Building (Buffalo Dry Dock) (Hull No. 903). Buffalo. N.Y.; taken over incomplete 1917 Dec 5 and transferred to Navy Yard for completion. 
'"Placed in U.S. Navy service on return from loan to Great Britain; retained Royal Navy names Grinil.ill and Kempthorne, respei lively. 



1171 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 
Service Craft Built By The Navy Yard: A Gallery 




Coal Barge No. 288 (YC-288) 
In the early years of the 1900s, the Navy built or acquired hundreds of 
barges to carry coal. The Navy Yard constructed 22 such craft between 
1903 and 1914. The next to the last of these barges, YC-288 is being used 
to transport ammunition in this photograph that dates to the mid-1 920s. 

Boston Public Library 



Floating Derrick No. 21 (YD-21 ) 
This 150-ton capacity floating crane was one of several the Navy pur- 
chased from a Cleveland, Ohio, firm and assembled at various navy yards. 
The craft is seen here at Pier 9. At left is the Watch House (Building 1 28), 
while one of the yard's Latrines (Building 1 27) is at right. BOSTS-8883 




YF-891 (YF-891) 
Covered lighter YF-891 is seen on July 16, 1945. She would be sold two 
years later and converted into a civilian drilling barge, being renamed Mag- 
nolia Drilling Barge No. 1. BOSTS-14789 



Motor Tug No. 75(YMT-15) 
Floating derrick YD-11 lifts newly-completed Motor Tug No. ?5(YMT-15) 
off the cradle bringing the craft from Building 104, where she had been 
constructed, during her launching ceremonies on February 18, 1932. Build- 
ings 42 and 103 can be seen in the background. BOSTS-14892 




YSD-11 (YSD-11) 

Not all craft were built on traditional exterior inclined building ways. Here, 
the hull of self-propelled seaplane wrecking derrick YSD-1 Hakes shape in 
the Assembly Shop (Building 195) on July 5, 1940. BOSTS-14885 



Torpedo Testing Barge No. 2 (YTT-2) 
Torpedo Testing Barge No. 2 is readied for launching on June 21. 1917. 

BOSTS-14457 



ll 72 



Appendix B, Ships Built By The Navy Yard 



Part II - Service Craft 



Hull No. 



Launched Fate 



Anchor Hoy and Tank 
None 1834 Jul 28 



Unknown 



Dry Dock Caisson (Dry Dock 1) 
None 1901 Oct. 31 Active NPS 2008 



Powder Boat 
None 

Ash Lighter 
•YA-13 
YA-14 

Coal Barge 

YC-90 

YC-91 

YC-92 

YC-93 

YC-94 

YC-95 
•YC-96 

YC-97 

YC-98 

YC-99 

YC-100 

YC-101 

YC-102 

YC-103 

YC-104 

YC-105 
•YC-227 

YC-228 

YC-229 

YC-230 

YC-288 
•YC-289 



1861 Dec. 21 Unknown 



1905 
1905 



1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1903 

1908 Mar 25 

1908 May 2 

1908 May 29 

1908 Dec 29 

1914 

1914 



Caisson Barge 

•YC-1147 1944 Jul 26' 

•YC-1148 1944 Jul 26 1 



Floating Derrick 



YD-2 2 
•YD-21 3 

YD-22 
•YD-35 
•YD-77 

YD- 179 



1892 

1912 Aug 8 
1913 
1913 

1942 Nov 1 
1949 Jan 14' 



Ammunition Lighter 
YE-17 1910 

YE-23 1910 Feb 20 

Freight Lighter 
YF-77 1918 



Sold 1945 

Reclassified YD-65 (1928); reclassified 
YC-690 (193?); scrapped 1940 

Stricken 193? 

Stricken 193? 

Stricken 193? 

Stricken 193? 

Stricken 193? 

Stricken 193? 

Reclassified YD-20 (1911); sold 1976 

Sold 1922 

Stricken 1916/9? 

Sold 1922 

Sold 1923 

Sold 1924 

Stricken 193? 

Sold 1922 

Sold 1924 

Sold 1924 

Reclassified YPD-20 (1913); stricken 195? 

Stricken 1909? 

Stricken 191? 

Sold 1923 

Sold 1935 

Sold 19?? 

Rerated equipment 1945 
Rerated equipment 1945 

Stricken 1916/9? 
Stricken 1947 
Stricken 1914/6? 
Sold 19?? 
Sold 1985 
To Mexico 1964 

Reclassified YF-234 (193?); sold 1935 
Reclassified YF-235 (193?); stricken 1934 



YF-78 



1918 



Reclassification to YR- 

(1919); sold 1935 
Sold 1923 



11 cancelled 



• Denotes service craft listed in Apr. 1945 edition of Ships Data. U.S. Naval Vessels. 
Most unknown disposals occurred between 1949 and 1965. 

1 Date completed. 

2 Shown as Dewey in FY 1 909 Annual Report of the Secretary of the Navy. 
'Assembled at Navy Yard; supplied by Wellman-Seaver-Morgan. Cleveland. 

Ohio, with pontoon built by New York Shipbuilding (Hull No. 1 27). Camden, N.J. 



Hull No. 


Launched 


Fate 


•YF-79 


1918 


Reclassified YFN-79 (1946); stricken 19?? 


•YF-80 


1918 


Reclassified YFN-80 (1946); stricken 19?? 


•YF-81 


1918 


Reclassified YFN-81 (1946); stricken 19?? 


•YF-82 


1918 


Reclassified YFN-82 (1946); stricken 
1947 


Covered Lighter 




•YF-258 


1940 Aug 22 


Reclassified YFN-258 (1946); reclassified 
YRB-1 (1948); stricken 1995; sold 1999 


YF-728 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 4 


YF-729 


Never 


Cancelled 1944' 


YF-730 


Never 


Cancelled 1944' 


YF-731 


Never 


Cancelled 1944' 


YF-732 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 4 


YF-733 


Never 


Cancelled 1944' 


YF-734 


Never 


Cancelled 1944' 


YF-735 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 4 


YF-736 


Never 


Cancelled 1944 4 


•YF-891 


1945 Jun 9 


Reclassified YFN-891 (1946); sold 1947 


•YF-892 


1945 Jun 9 


Reclassified YFN-892 (1946); sold 1947 


•YF-893 


1945 Jul 30 


Reclassified YFN-893 (1946); sold 1947 



Covered Lighter (Non-Self-Propelled) 

YFN-1226 1965 Jun 18 Reclassified YC- 1461 (196?); stricken 

1981 

YFN-1227 1965 Reclassified YC-1462 (196?); stricken 

1980 

YFN-1228 1965 Reclassified YC- 1463 (196?); sunk as tar- 

get 1975 

YFN-1229 1965 Sep 10 Reclassified YC- 1464 (196?); active USN 

2008 



Garbage Lighter 
•YG-5 1905 



Reclassified YGN-5 (1946): stricken 19?? 



Motor Tug 

•YMT-15 1932 Feb 18 Reclassified YTL-479 (1944); stricken 

19?? 



Floating Pile Driver 
YPD-5 1904 

Floating Workshop 
YR-1 1904 

Stevedoring Barge 
YS-91 1941 Jun' 

YS-92 1941 Jun' 

YS-93 1941 Sep 3' 

YS-94 1941 Sep 19' 

YS-95 1941 Sep 10' 

Seaplane Wrecking Derrick 
•YSD-11 1940 Aug 21 

•YSD-20 1941 Mar 6 

•YSD-22 1941 Feb 14 

•YSD-23 1941 Feb 15 



Stricken 1916/9? 

Reclassified YD-23 (1912); sold 194? 

Classification cancelled 1942 

Classification cancelled 1942 

Classification cancelled 1942 

Classification cancelled 1942 

Classification cancelled 1942 

Stricken 19?? 
Stricken 19?? 
Stricken 19?? 
Stricken 19?? 



Sludge Removal Barge 

•YSR-3 1941 Dec 31 Stricken 19?? 

Torpedo Testing Barge 

•YTT-2 1917 Jun 21 Stricken 1948 



4 Reordered from other builders— Cramp Shipbuilding. Philadelphia, Pa. (YF- 
728 to YF-733) and Erie Concrete & Supply. Erie, Pa. (YF-734 to YF-736). 



- 1173 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 
Part III - Foreign Naval Names For Transferred Vessels 



Hull No. 



Country 



Foreign Name (Hull No.) 



Hull No. 



Country 



Foreign Name (Hull No.) 



BDE-1 Britain Bayntun (K.310) 

BDE-2 Britain Bazely (K.3 11) 

BDE-3 Britain Berry (K.3 12) 

BDE-4 Britain Blackwood (K.3 13) 

BDE-12 Britain Burges (K.347) 

DD-442 Italy Aviere (D-554) 

DD-472 Brazil fWi- (D-27) 

DD-473 Brazil Paraiba (D-28) 

DD-581 Greece te/os(D-16) 

DD-582 Greece 4sp« (D-06) 

DD-583 Greece Lonchi (D-56) 

DD-663 Japan /fm/Av (DD-183) 

DD-664 Japan Yugure (DD-184) 

DE-6 China T'ai Kang (DE-21) 

DE-266 Britain Cape! (K.470) 

DE-267 Britain CooAe (K.471) 

DE-268 Britain Dacres (K.472) 

DE-269 Britain Do;»f// (K.473) 

DE-270 Britain Foley (K.474) 

DE-271 Britain Garlies (K.47 5) 

DE-272 Britain GowW (K.476) 

DE-273 Britain Grindall (K.477) 

DE-274 Britain Gardiner (K.478) 

DE-275 Britain Gooc?a/7 (K.479) 

DE-276 Britain Goodson (K.480) 

DE-277 Britain Gore (K.481) 

DE-278 Britain tfeate (K.482) 

DE-279 Britain Kempthorne (K.483) 

DE-280 Britain KingsmiU (K..484) 

DE-516 Britain Lawford (K.5 14) 




HMS Baynfun (BDE-1) 
With the East Boston waterfront in the background, HMS Bayntun (BDE- 
1 ) is seen off the Navy Yard on February 8, 1 943. Named for Capt. Henry 
W. Bayntun, who commanded HMS Leviathan at the Battle of Trafalgar in 
1 805, she served in the North Atlantic until returned to American custody 
in August 1 945. She was commissioned as USS Bayntun (DE-1 ) for re- 
turn to the United States, one of nine Boston-built escorts to have brief 
careers as American warships following British service. BOSTS-10381 



DE-517 


Britain 


Louis (K.5 15) 


DE-518 


Britain 


Law son (K.5 16) 


DE-519 


Britain 


Pasley (K.564) [ex-Lindsay] 


DE-520 


Britain 


Loring (K.565) 


DE-521 


Britain 


Hosre (K.566) [ex-Mitchell] 


DE-522 


Britain 


Moorsom (K.567) 


DE-523 


Britain 


Manners (K.568) 


DE-524 


Britain 


Mounsey (K.569) 


DE-525 


Britain 


Inglis (K.570) 


DE-526 


Britain 


Inman (K.571) 


IX-311 


Philippines 


Tulungan (AH-3) 


LSD-21 


Greece 


Najkratoussa (L-153) 


LST-301 


Britain 


LST-301 


LST-302 


Britain 


LST-302 


LST-303 


Britain 


LST-303 


LST-304 


Britain 


LST-304 


LST-305 


Britain 


LST-305 


LST-983 


Indonesia 


Teluk Tomani 


LST-987 


Germany 


[Unknown] 


LST-993 


China 


Chung Hsun (LST-208) 


LST-1030 


China 


Chung Oman (LST-221) 


LST-1033 


China 


Chung Sheng (LST-2 1 1 ) 


SS-522 


Brazil 


Ceara (S-14) 


SS-523 


Brazil 


Rio Grande do Sul (S- 11) 


SS-524 


Italy 


Primo Longobardo (S-501) 


SS-525 


Venezuela 


Picua (S-13) 


Maratanza 


Haiti 


Salnave 


Merrimack 


CSA 


Virginia 


Pequot 


Haiti 


Terreur 



t* in :>—i 



kari 



■Tw cii*r >/ **• MM. AT **lM. 

B.H.n, wuw (at jcm! ■ JtfUftn Mraaajslaa. 

la! •>*. M*, *.«<> ■rj/.a-u at >.•-«. ira 

-,,«.«. » " ■' '« m> mi win—* at «m 
»a. f Ta*a « PrMcr. II !«.mm.i "M at !*«a It* I. 
kmmv tea* fUH at »M *— ■ «f !*• •■••*; at Mr 
at , lar i MM. 



■ I MM aM llWM *f lfl«RTI 

n. • .»./. 

Mat Taat , sjonc^. 



i M7 llailwIMd imiui 



• I u> limlt« mm raalrlaVM M IU lawn 

mmrtr, (vili ft Ww *MM*r. arrtaara «r IH 

fat aat Vallri mm Walr faatltM. •— m- 
lUrMI >» Ui Tip! 

<«'i mtiiiifii it* faraarta* ■• tWMaara Ul 



HMS Mounsey (DE-524) 
This report by Navy Yard Commandant Rear Adm. R.A. Theobald to the 
Bureau of Ships documented the christening of HMS Mounsey and her 
transfer to the Royal Navy. BOSTS-15404 



• 


Ui l»W.I It MMf 1») 


M|i ».«.«. mm r» tat: - mtimmim u»mmm 




U| lilllll far MlMtlM «f 




Uri. '. '. 1. Hull li km »lfi a* awl, 

i. r. J. UIIUl, Cat M>. MllMl ifflMI 
ar taa Mavai M*r 1*m. 




lr: Mm m atai ar riaW aaat. 




ajftaa, a »-• f.aa aiata iinai.1. aMajajai. 




1 ■ innj art** tM MrtalMalat, ta Mir mi tu*M 

■ 1 ■!■■!>■ Il IM IrlLIM MRf 




I . "%»-.• 

Mar ajalMl. r.a.a. 


Ma. u> HattaMlltal 


Ma/ M- 

ll.ar. . . .. 



174 



Appendix C 

Navy Yard Collections 



THE FOLLOWING is a brief guide to collections of archival 
and other unpublished materials relating to the Charlestown 
Navy Yard. It is not intended as a substitute for more de- 
tailed finding aids listed for individual collections, but to provide a 
guide to the general contents of the particular collections. This 
guide does not include detailed descriptions of physical objects 
that are in the collection of Boston National Historical Park. It also 
does not include materials relating to USS Constitution held by the 
USS Constitution Museum and other institutions. 

This appendix lists collections held by Boston National His- 
torical Park first, followed by those in the National Archives. Other 
collections having Navy Yard-related material follow, arranged al- 
phabetically by the holding institution, and thereunder by that 
institution's arrangement of the material. Note that the descriptions 
include only items relevant to the Charlestown Navy Yard, which 
are often a minor part of a large collection. Since this guide has been 
compiled largely from entries in the National Union Catalog of Manu- 
script Collections, other archival guides, and citations in secondary 
sources, this listing is undoubtedly incomplete and some collec- 
tions listed because of the individual's association with the Navy 
Yard may actually contain little if any Navy Yard-related material. 

Boston National Historical Park's Scope of Collections State- 
ment was approved on October 18, 1985. In addition to machinery 
relating to the Ropewalk and Chain Forge, it states that "the park 
will acquire representative objects from all areas of the Navy Yard 
which have value for exhibiting, illustrating, or documenting signifi- 
cant aspects of Navy Yard history" as well as "objects associated 
with the history of the U.S. Marines at the Charlestown Navy Yard, 
particularly the marines' [sic] activities and duties in the Navy Yard. " 
It provides that "the park will seek to avoid competition with the 
USS Constitution Museum for museum items" relating to USS Con- 
stitution and would "selectively collect" materials relating to ships 
built or repaired at the yard. With regard to documentary and archi- 
val materials, the statement called for preservation of documents 
and photographs "which record the historic activities, people, struc- 
tures, events, and appearance of the Navy Yard." Finally, it pro- 
vides for the collection of "all scientifically excavated archeological 
materials from NPS property connected with the Navy Yard."' 

A Collection Management Plan (CMP) for the park was com- 
pleted in September 1994. 2 This document made specific recommen- 
dations for the processing and management of the park's museum 
collections as well as on the format and content of the Scope of 
Collections Statement. Many of the recommendations of the plan 



1 Boston National Historical Park, Scope of Collection Statement. Boston 
National Historical Park (Mar. 1985). TIC 457/D6145. p. 9 18. This 
document treats USS Cassin Young as a part of the Navy Yard collections 
rather than as an independent site. 

1 Boston National Historical Park Collection Management Plan, Sept. 
1994 ([Boston]: Branch of Museum Services. Division of Cultural Resources, 
North Atlantic Region. 1994). TIC 457/D6288. 



have been implemented, and there has been an ongoing effort 
through various funding means to process and catalog park collec- 
tions. A project (PMIS 908 1 2) to produce a new Collection Manage- 
ment Plan for the park to take into account changes since the 1994 
plan and current National Park Service policies is currently under- 
way. An update of the Scope of Collections Statement in accor- 
dance with the recommendations of the new CMP is scheduled for 
FY 2011. 

At the current time, the finding aids for the Boston National 
Historical Park Archives consist of a series of documents produced 
at different times and with different levels of detail. They are out- 
dated, both in terms of changes to the organization of the collection 
since the original finding aid was prepared in 1981 and in terms of 
including all Navy Yard-related collections. The park has submitted 
a project (PMIS 108004) to provide a single comprehensive and 
consistent finding aid for the Records of the Boston Naval Ship- 
yard, the Boston Naval Shipyard Related Collections, the Boston 
Naval Shipyard Oral History Project, and the Boston Naval Ship- 
yard Photo Collection. 

Currently, most park archival materials are available to research- 
ers only through personal visits to the archives or as copies pro- 
duced on demand in response to mail and telephone inquiries. The 
park has submitted a project (PMIS 16841) to digitize portions of the 
Boston Naval Shipyard Collection to allow it to be more widely 
available. This project includes selected photographs together with 
architectural and engineering plans, the two series of ships' history 
files, and the Boston Naval Shipyard News. 

It should be noted that as a matter of policy and to protect 
copyrights, the Boston National Historical Park Archives will not 
provide copies of materials held by other institutions to non-official 
researchers. 

Boston National Historical Park Archives 

Building 107, Charlestown Navy Yard 
Boston, Mass. 

Scope: Includes archival documents; architectural and engineering draw- 
ings; photographic prints, negatives, and slides; motion picture film; 
oral history recordings and transcripts; and miscellaneous materials 
relating to the history and operation of the Boston Naval Shipyard and 
USS Cassin Young (DD-793). The bulk of the collection consists of 
records of the shipyard acquired either by transfer from the Navy or 
field collection; other materials have been acquired from private indi- 
viduals and organizations. Some materials are on loan from the Naval 
Historical Center. 

Boston Naval Shipyard Oral History Project 

Textual Records: Includes correspondence, questionaires, permissions, 
and other administrative documents: and transcripts of oral history 
interviews of persons associated with the Boston Naval Shipyard, 
1 94 1-1 995. Among the topics covered are life as yard residents: yard 
shops, including the Ropewalk. Foundry, Pattern Shop. Electrical Shop. 



1175 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



and Forge Shop; women workers during World War II; and yard man- 
agement and support activities. 

Audiovisual Material: Includes audio cassettes and reel-to-reel tape 
recordings of oral history interviews. (163 items) 

NPS Catalog No.: The National Park Service has lot-cataloged all oral 
history materials as BOSTS- 16364. 

Related Material: Documents and photographs donated in conjunction 
with oral history interviews are to be found in the Boston Naval 
Shipyard Photo Collection and in the Boston Naval Shipyard Related 
Collections (RG 2). Artifacts donated in conjunction with oral history 
interviews are part of the Boston Naval Shipyard Collection of the 
Boston National Historical Park Museum Collection. 

Finding Aids: Francy K. Bockoven, Boston National Historical Park 
Oral History Program: A Guide to Park Library Holdings (July 1 985) , 
TIC 457/D6334. 

Boston Naval Shipyard Photo Collection 

Textual Records: Includes original photograph and negative envelopes 
and catalog folders containing originals and copies of captions origi- 
nally attached to photographs and cataloger notes relating to identifi- 
cation of individuals, etc., in the photographs. 

Audiovisual Material: Includes still images (prints, negatives, slides, 
and albums) relating to people, events, and structures within the Bos- 
ton Naval Shipyard and the South Boston Annex; sites under the 
jurisdiction of the First Naval District; ships that were built by, refit- 
ted at, or visited the Boston Naval Shipyard; and USS Cassin Young. 
(75,227 items) The majority of the images were originally part of the 
Records of the Boston Naval Shipyard (RG 1), particularly the ships' 
history files and the Public Works completed design projects files. 
Others have been acquired from private sources. 

Includes motion pictures (positive and negative) and filmstips relating 
to the yard and its activities. (69 items) Among the principal subjects 
are sonar dome installation on USS Willis A. Lee (DL-4); launch of USS 
Bennett (DD-473), USS Fullam (DD-474), and USS Hudson (DD- 
475); raising of the sunken USS Lancetfish (SS-296); and work in the 
Forge Shop and the Ropewalk. The latter material includes film of the 
CBS television program Let's Take A Trip featuring the Forge Shop and 
broadcast live on Oct. 28, 1956. 

NPS Catalog Nos.: The National Park Service has lot-cataloged photo- 
graphs according to the artificial subject arrangement developed by 
park staff in the late 1970s, in approximately 7,136 lots. Motion 
pictures and filmstrips have been individually cataloged. 

Related Material: Additional photographs are found in the Records of 
the Boston Naval Shipyard (RG 1) among the records of the Public 
Works Department (RG 1.4) and the Boston Caretaker Group (RG 
1.9). 

The park holds reference copies of Navy Yard photographs found in 
other repositories (see below), as well as video cassette and DVD 
reference copies of many of the motion pictures in the collection. 
Many of the images in the collection may also be found in the Records 
of the Bureau of Ships (RG 19) in the National Archives and/or in the 
Naval Historical Center. 

Finding Aids: Barbara Allen Bither, Authority File/Subject Access for the 
Boston Naval Shipyard Photograph and Plan Collections. Boston Na- 
tional Historical Park. Organized as Part of Contract Numbers 
CXI 600-8-0026 and CXI 600-90-036, 2 vols. (Sept. 1997), TIC 457/ 
D6332; Barbara Allen Bither, Completion Report : Catalog Photographic 
Archives. Boston National Historical Park. Contract Numbers CXI 600- 
8-0026 and CX1600-90-036 (Sept. 1997), TIC 457/D6330A. 



Record Group 1 
Records of the Boston Naval Shipyard, 1795-1975 

Textual Records: Includes records of the Boston Naval Shipyard; Bos- 
ton Caretaker Group, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard; and the Defense 
Property Disposal Office. Records are arranged in ten sub-groups, as 
follows: 

Sub-Croup 1: Records ofthe Shipyard Commander, 1813-1974: Diary of 
transactions; orders and circulars; closure files; inspection records; 
histories; annual reports; correspondence; instructions; journals; memo- 
randa; and registers. Records of the Public Affairs Assistant: ships' 
history files. Records of the Industrial Relations Office: ships' his- 
tory files; shipyard newspaper, Boston Naval Shipyard News. 1936- 
1974. 

Sub-Group 2: Records of the Planning Department. Planning & Estimat- 
ing Division. Job Planning Branch. 

Sub-Group 3: Records of the Production Department: Time books; dry 
dock files; ship test files; inspection records; inventories: awards; 
certificates; memoranda; notebooks; plans; registers; reports; and 
records relating to the Ropewalk, Forge Shop, Pattern Shop, and Sail 
Loft. 

Sub-Group 4: Records of the Public Works Department, including test 
records; crane records; inspection records; computation books; furni- 
ture registers; contracts; correspondence; buildings' history files: logs: 
orders; reports; and completed design project files. 

Sub-Group 5: Records of the Supply Department: Correspondence; 
allowance records; purchase logs; store orders: mess papers: journals: 
and ledgers. 

Sub-Group 6: Records of the Comptroller Department: Accounts: jour- 
nals; ledgers; logs; memoranda: and payrolls. 

Sub-Group 7: Records ofthe Dental Department: Clippings files. 

Sub-Group 8: Records of the Administrative Department: Police logs: 
telephone directories; watch reports; miscellaneous papers: and secu- 
rity log books. 

Sub-Group 9: Records of the Boston Caretaker Group. 1951-1976. relat- 
ing to shipyard closure: Correspondence: real estate records: equip- 
ment disposition records: and personnel records. 

Sub-Group 10: Records of the Defense Property Disposal Office, relat- 
ing to shipyard closure: Correspondence and records relating to dispo- 
sition of equipment. 

Architectural and Engineering Plans: (1.4) Architectural drawings of 
the Boston Naval Shipyard. South Boston Annex, and outside areas. 
(20,780 items) Additional drawings are found interfiled in a number of 
series of records, particularly those of the Public Works Department 
(RG 1.4) and the Boston Caretaker Group (RG 1.9). 

Audiovisual Material: With the exception of the records of the Public 
Works Department (RG 1.4). photographs originally filed with these 
records have been removed and organized as part ofthe Boston Naval 
Shipyard Photo Collection. 

NPS Catalog Nos.: Because the records were collected from a variety of 
sources, including official transfer from the Navy, field collection, and 
donation and often lacked original archival provenance, the National 
Park Service organized the records in accordance with the organiza- 
tional hierarchy of the shipyard and has lot cataloged the majority of 
the records by major organizational groups. The catalog numbers 
assigned to the records are as follows: 

BOSTS 13344 Sub-Group 1. Shipyard Commander 

BOSTS- 13345 Sub-Group 2. Planning Department 



176 



Appendix C, Navy Yard Collections 



Boston Naval Shipyard Photo Collection: A Gallery 



THE MOST UTILIZED RESOURCE in the Boston National Histori- 
cal Park Archives is the Boston Naval Shipyard Photo Collection. 
The core of this collection are prints, negatives, and transparencies 
which had been in the yard's Photographic Laboratory at the time of 
closure, augmented by those found in the files of the Boston Naval 
Shipyard News. These two sources have been supplemented by 
images found interfiled with other archival records or acquired by 
field collection or donation. 

One of the earliest decisions made by park curators was to 
organize the photographic materials by subject matter rather than 
try to assemble it by provenance. This organization was reinforced 
during the collection's formal cataloging. 

Most of the photographs taken by the Navy Yard were as- 
signed numbers in accordance with one of three different schemes 



depending on when they were taken. These numbers were placed 
on negatives or in captions applied to prints. From the late 1 890s to 
about 1914, images were assigned file numbers and then serial num- 
bers (e.g., F401 N186). These file numbers correspond to the file 
numbers used by Public Works for architectural drawings. 

From about 1 9 1 3 to 1 930 all images were assigned a consecu- 
tive number. After 1930, separate numerical series were used for 
each year's output, with the year being added as a suffix to the 
image number (e.g., 1250-41). These numbers were often combined 
with either the file code "NY2" or "NYBos" to further identify them 
as having been taken by the Navy Yard. 

This gallery presents a selection of images from the collection 
which show both the style of numbering and the scope of material 
found in it. 




This Oct. 2, 1 902, image of the construction of Dry Dock 2 bears the file 
number "F401 N1 86" as well as the date and subject matter. This is typical 
of the identification of images, many of which were glass plates, in the first 
decade and a half of the 20th century, and indicates that it was the 1 86th 
image filed under subject 401, Dry Dock 2. BOSTS-8808 




Starting around 1913 and continuing until 1 930, negatives were assigned 
consecutive numbers. By extrapolation from items which bear more de- 
tailed captions, rough dates can be assigned to most images from this 
period. For example, this picture of two dogs outside of Building 38 bears 







si's 



fin j/m-i 



sa 



_,..« 







- . \\ ' .. •nnr 



- 



The various types of 
photographs taken 
by the yard's pho- 
tographers are indi- 
cated on this page 
from the 1972 nega- 
tive log, the only 
such document to 
survive. It records 
that 17,366 nega- 
tives and slides 
were made during 
the year. BNHP 




From 1 930 until the closure of the yard, photographs were numbered in 
separate series for each year. Photograph 1224-41 was taken on June 14, 
1941 , during the christening/launching of the destroyer USS Fitch (DD- 



the number "3999," which dates it to July 1918. 



BOSTS-9369 462). 



BOSTS-11126 



- 1 1 77 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 
Boston Naval Shipyard Photo Collection: A Gallery 




Because the First Naval District was headquartered in Boston, the yard 
took photographs of various installations throughout the district's territory. 
Image 6332 of Oct. 1 , 1 921 , shows the Radio Compass Station located at 
Cape Elizabeth, Me. BOSTS-8482 




The Photographic Laboratory supported the Boston Naval Shipyard News. 
Thus, its personnel took photographs of social events in the yard as well 
as official ceremonies. This view shows yard employees and their families 
at the Aug. 24, 1 973, "Apple Orchard" party near Quarters P celebrating the 
yard's 1 73rd birthday. BOSTS-7549 




Yard photographers were called out to document accidents which hap- 
pened in the yard. Image 863-57 was taken on Mar. 7, 1957, after Navy 
stakebody truck 97-07924 went through the railing surrounding Dry Dock 
2. BOSTS- 15698 




Photograph 1 074-47, dated Sept. 11,1 947, was part of a series document- 
ing the Navy's Winter Harbor Radio Station at Schoodic Point, Me. This 
facility is now part of Acadia National Park. BOSTS-8493 




A large number of photographs in the collection were taken to document 
the myriad details of naval vessels. This Dec. 8, 1970, image shows 
components of the experimental controllable pitch propeller installed on 
USS Patterson (DE-1 061 ). The "A.S.F." before many photo numbers pos- 
sibly stands for "Active Ship File." BOSTS-13883 




Among the final images taken by the Photographic Laboratory was this 
Nov. 5, 1974, photo (12873-74) showing a mock grave for the Boston 
Naval Shipyard in the Assistant Public Works Officer's parking space on 
Second Ave. outside of Building 34. BOSTS-10084 



178 



Appendix C, Navy Yard Collections 



BOSTS- 13346 Sub-Group 3, Production Department 

BOSTS-13347 Sub-Group 4. Public Works Department 

BOSTS- 13348 Sub-Group 5, Supply Department 

BOSTS- 13349 Sub-Group 6, Comptroller Department 

BOSTS- 13350 Sub-Group 7, Dental Department 

BOSTS- 13351 Sub-Group 8. Administrative Department 

BOSTS- 1 3352 Boston Naval Shipyard News 

BOSTS-15157 Sub-Group 9, Boston Caretaker Group Go 

sure Records 
BOSTS- 15404 Public Affairs Files 

BOSTS-15405 Ships' History Files 

BOSTS- 15406 Sub-Group 9, Closure Records Drawing Col- 

lection 
BOSTS-16511 Sub-Group 10, DPDO Closure Records 

BOSTS-16512 Sub-Group 10, DPDO Closure Records [De- 

accessioned] 

Architectural and engineering drawings have been lot-cataloged ac- 
cording to building or subject number assigned by the Public Works 
Department. 

Related Material: Records of the First Naval District relating to the 
yard and personal papers of yard employees are in Boston Naval 
Shipyard Related Collections (RG 2). 

The bulk of the records of the Boston Navy Yard and the First Naval 
District are found in the National Archives-Northeast Region (Bos- 
ton), Waltham. Mass. (RG 181). Additional Navy Yard records are to 
be found in the records of the Department of the Navy and its various 
bureaus in the National Archives in Washington, D.C., and College 
Park, Md. (RG 19, RG 45, RG 71). 

Architectural and engineering drawings of the South Boston Annex are 
held by the Boston Redevelopment Authority, 

Finding Aids: Barbara Allen Bither, Boston Naval Shipyard News: List 
of Illustrated Vessels Including US and Foreign Ships (1994), TIC 
457/D6331; Boston National Historical Park, Addenda: Guide to the 
Records of the Boston Naval Shipyard Collection (Aug. 17,1 987) , TIC 
457/D6112A; Boston National Historical Park, Finding Aid for the 
Records of the Boston Naval Shipyard. Record Group 1 (Mar. 1991). 
TIC 457/D6112B; Boston National Historical Park, Guide to the Ar- 
chives of Boston National Historical Park (Feb. 6. 1996), TIC 457/ 
D6112C; Edward W. Hanson. A Guide to the Records of the Boston 
Naval Shipyard ([Boston]: Boston National Historical Park. 1981), 
TIC 457/D61 12; Darby Moore, Department of Defense-Defense Prop- 
erty Disposal Office Records Relating to the Boston Naval Shipyard 
Closure. 1946-1990 (Bulk Dates 1972-1976] (Boston: Northeast 
Museum Services Center, 2000), TIC 457/D6335; Darby Moore and 
Tara O 'Connor, Box and Folder Listing for Material to be Deaccessioned 
from the Collection: Boston National Historical Park. Department of 
Defense/Defense Property Disposal Office Records Relating to the Clo- 
sure of the Boston Naval Shipyard. 1946- 1990 [bulk dates 1972-1976] 
(Jan. 2000), TIC 457/D6337; National Park Service, Northeast Mu- 
seum Services Center, Finding Aid: Architectural Drawings of 'the Bos- 
ton Naval Shipyard (Dec. 2000). TIC 457/D6333; Scope and Content 
Note, Record Group 1. Series 13. Public Affairs. Public Relations and 
Ceremony Files Maintained by the Assistant to the Shipyard Com- 
mander. 1936-1976 (n.d.), TIC 457/D6338; Scope and Content Note. 
Record Group 1. Series 26. Ship History Files Maintained by the Edi 
tonal Staff of Me Boston Naval Shipyard News, 1936-1975 (n.d.). TIC 
457/D6339. 

Record Group 2 
Boston Naval Shipyard Related Collections 

Scope: Includes materials related to the Navy Yard that are not official 
records of the shipyard. Not all of the individual collections have been 



assigned sub-group numbers within Record Group 2. The following 
listing is arranged alphabetically by title rather than in sub-group or- 
der. 

Boston Naval Shipyard Employees Personal Papers 

Textual Records: Includes papers from William Bainbridge, 1 825; Posey 
Green Bowers, Jr., 1941-c. 1943; Lyman Carlow, 1943-1974; George 
Chamberlain, 1 973; Allan B. Corrigan, 1 939- 1 960; Arthur E. Ericson, 
1943-1962; Albert S.Greene, 1872-1920; Melvin Hooper, 1909-1977; 
Paul Ivas; Albeit M. Leahy; Louis Mackeil; Edward P. Ryan, 1906- 
1909: Richard J. Ryan. 1916; Edmund B. Skelly, 1950-1972; Charles 
A. Snell, 1957-1965; Maynard Spekin; Dennis Sullivan. 1942-1950; 
John Francis Sullivan, c. 1917; and Edward W. Sutherby, 1971. 

Related Material: Artifacts donated as part of collections of personal 
papers are part of the Boston Naval Shipyard Collection of the Bos- 
ton National Historical Park Museum Collection. 

Chain Forge Documents (K. Mitchell Collection) 

Textual Records: Consists of records related to the operation of the 
Chain Forge, including orders received; production output; machine 
usage and output; staffing; manpower; technical manuals for anchor 
chain and carpenter stoppers; special studies and reports; military 
specifications; equipment brochures and manuals; and general infor- 
mation on the shipyard. The material was donated to the park by Ken 
Mitchell, last master of the Forge Shop. 

Audiovisual Material: Includes photographs of Chain Forge activities 
and personnel. 

NPS Catalog No.: The National Park Service has lot-cataloged this 
collection as BOSTS-16015. 

First Naval District Papers 

Textual Records: Miscellaneous papers. 1968-1976. including memo- 
randa, reports, and letters relating to alternative uses of the shipyard, 
1973. 

Related Material: The main collection of Records of the First Naval 
District are in the National Archives-Northeast Region (Boston). 
Waltham, Mass. (RG 181.2). 

Frederick Cobb Russell Papers, 1862-65 

Textual Records: Journals, correspondence received, and miscellaneous 
papers of Frederick Cobb Russell (1841-1925). relating to his naval 
service as an engineer on various ships during the Civil War. 

Joseph T. Ogden Papers, 1919 85 
Textual Records: Diary, 1919-20: and miscellaneous papers. 

Master Mechanics' and Foreman's Association, 1938-70 

Textual Records: Materials relating to the Master Mechanics' and 
Foreman's Association: Annual publication. 1942, 1946. 1948-1953: 
scrapbook, 1951-1953, containing clippings from Boston-area news- 
papers; an incomplete set of Boston Naval Shipyard News, 1949- 
1953; and various issues of newspapers from other shipyards. 1953- 
1970. 

Navy Agent In Boston Papers, 1830 33 

Textual Records: letter copybook of official correspondence of the 
Navy Agent in Boston, Daniel Dodge Brodhead. 1830-1933. (I vol.) 

Related Material: The main collection of the Papers of Daniel Dodge 
Brodhead is located in the Manuscript Division. I. ibrarv of Congress. 

Ropewalk Collection (D. Himmelfai b Collection) 
Scope: Material relating to ropemaking and the at ti\ ities of the Navy 



- 1 1 79 - 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Stucty 
Sub-Surface Drawings: A Gallery 



AMONG THE MOST SIGNIFICANT and useful drawings in the 
Boston National Historical Park Collection are the "Topographic 
and Sub-Surface Map" group, identified as Subject 440 in the yard's 
Public Works Department filing system. These drawings, originally 
prepared in 1913 and 1914 but continually updated, utilize color to 



4 St 



->l 



& h &-_& U La % * 7 c s? 

a. fB. a 20 2x zz z? zv z<5 ._ 

m§£ml 3t> n& ?/ in-- 






- 

Vtf 9? $b «53r 
"7 




.,. .. 
>MT«n 1MJJ 




The area surrounding the Commandant's House (Quarters G) is included 
on Sheet 15. The various shades of red/orange denote differing material 
types used for water and sewer lines and electrical conduits, while yellow 
denotes concrete ducts or conduits. Green is here used for hot water 
lines. The line across the lower portion of this drawing is the Metropolitan 
Sewer, constructed through the yard by the predecessor of today's Mas- 
sachusetts Water Resources Authority in the 1890s under a revocable 
permit from the Navy. BOSTS-13465 



The Discharge Culvert running between Dry Dock 1 and the Pumphouse 
(Building 123) is shown in green on Sheet 36. This brick structure, now 
sealed at both ends, runs under both Building 1 25 and Dry Dock 2. 

BOSTS-13465 



depict all of the sub-surface features in the Navy Yard and reveal the 
complex collection of utilities required to support this military-in- 
dustrial complex. While they do not record the changes made since 
the yard's closure, they form an essential source for archeological 
and other sub-surface work being performed in the yard today. 



The index to the sub-surface drawings shows how the grid was overlaid 
on the yard starting at its northern limit and moving east then west as it 
continued to the southern limit of the yard. The red underlining on this 
working copy denotes those drawings for which digital copies exist in 
Boston NHP files. 




Sheet 33 covers the normal berth of USS Constitution at Pier 1 West. 
Erasures are clearly visible on many maps, providing evidence of the 
yard's evolution. Here, the outline of Constitution to the west of the Finger 
Pier can be detected, reflecting the period in the late 1940s and early 1950s 
when USS Constellation (IX-20) occupied the berth now home to Consti- 
tution. BOSTS-13465 




II 80 



Appendix C, Navy Yard Collections 

Yard Ropewalk, including textual records (books, technical documents, 
memoranda and other correspondence, and notes), photographs, and 
physical objects. The material was donated to the park by David 
Himmelfarb, master of the Ropewalk from 1945 to 1970. 

Related Material: The report on the Ropewalk prepared by David 
Himmelfarb for the National Park Service in 1988 is found in the 
Technical Information Collection of the park's Division of Cultural 
Resources. 

NPS Catalog No.: The collection is currently uncataloged with the 
exception of artifacts utilized in park exhibits. 

Finding Aids: Brooke Childrey, Ropewalk Collection, Boston Naval 
Shipyard, Donated by David Himmelfarb. Last Master Ropemaker 
Boston Naval Shipyard (Nov. 12, 1992). TIC 457/D6340. 

Ship Records 

Textual Records: Miscellaneous records and materials relating to vari- 
ous ships associated with the Navy Yard, including USS Bennion (DD- 
662); USS Boston, 1843-45; USS Boston (CAG-1), 1967-72; and USS 
1ST- 1171 (LST-1171) and USS LST-1174 (LST-1174). 

Related Records: For records relating to USS Cassin Young (DD-793), 
see Records of USS Cassin Young (DD-793) (RG 3) in the Boston 
National Historical Park Archives. 

Stewart James Park Papers, 1822-36 

Textual Records: Correspondence, 1822-36, with Loammi Baldwin and 
Alexander Parris. including references to work being done at the Navy 
Yard. (4 items) 

Yeoman(F) Collections 

Textual Records: Gertrude C. MacDonald Scrapbook, containing clip- 
pings and other materials relating to enlisted women in the U.S. Navy 
during World War I. 

Record Group 3 
Records of USS Cassin Young (DD 793) 

Scope: Includes correspondence, memorandums, and other documents; 
manuals and publications; navigational charts; engineering drawings; 
personnel records: and miscellaneous materials relating to USS Cassin 
Young (DD-793), 1941-1978. Most of the material was stored on 
board the vessel at the time she was decommissioned in 1960 and 
removed by the park following arrival at Boston in 1978. Only items 
specifically relating to the Boston Naval Shipyard are described here. 

Related Material: Photographs and motion picture film relating to USS 
Cassin Young are part of the Boston Naval Shipyard Photograph Col- 
lection. 

USS Cassin Young Operational Records, 1941-1978 

Textual Records: Correspondence and memoranda, reports, forms, req- 
uisitions, and other documentation regarding overhauls of the ship at 
Boston Naval Shipyard, 1955-1959. 

NPS Catalog No.: The National Park Service has lot-cataloged all opera- 
tional records as BOSTC-1678. 

Finding Aids: Jonathan Bohan, Jennifer H. Quinn, and Melissa Underhill. 
Finding Aid for USS Cassin Young Archival Materials (draft; 1998). 
TIC457/D6341. 



Boston National Historical Park 
Division of Cultural Resources 

Building 107, Charlestown Navy Yard 
Boston, Mass. 

Boston Naval Shipyard Reference ("Vertical") Files 

Textual Records: Includes originals and copies of documents, clippings, 
and other material, including ephemera, relating to the Boston Naval 
Shipyard not accessioned into the park archives or museum collec- 
tions. 

Audiovisual Material: Includes copy prints of photographs held by 
other institutions or individuals not accessioned into the park archives 
or museum collections. 

Deed Files 

Textual Records: Includes copies of deeds and other documents relating 
to the acquisition of lands for inclusion in Boston National Historical 
Park. Arranged by deed number. 

Related Material: Boundary maps are found in the park's Technical 
Information Collection. 

Files of Cape Cod National Seashore 
Relating to New Area Study for Boston Naval Shipyard 

Textual Records: Includes files maintained by personnel of Cape Cod 
National Seashore relating to their participation in a new area study of 
the Boston Naval Shipyard in 1973, including correspondence, drafts, 
notes, and other material. The material, which remains in its original 
file folders but is otherwise unorganized, was transferred from Cape 
Cod National Seashore in Oct. 2003. 

Files Relating to Boston Naval Shipyard NHL 
Boundary Study 

Textual Records: Includes the contract file (CX4000-5-0713) for a 
National Historic Landmark (NHL) boundary study for the Boston 
Naval Shipyard prepared by Heritage Studies but never completed. 
Includes correspondence, comments, notes, drafts, and other material 
relating to the study and the NHL status of the Navy Yard. This 
material was received from the NHL Office, Philadelphia Support 
Office in June 2001. The files also include a copy of the Boston 
Support Office files on the Boston Naval Shipyard NHL made by the 
park in Aug. 2001. 

Park History Files 

Scope: Includes originals and copies of records of Boston National His 
torical Park retained for historical reference. Many of the records 
originally were part of the park's central files but not identified for 
permanent retention and transfer to the Federal Records Center for 
storage and possible accession by the National Archives. Other records 
include material relating to planning and other activities generated or 
maintained by Division of Cultural Resources personnel or transferred 
to the park by the Denver Service Center. 

Textual Records: Includes appointment books of Park Superintendent 

John Burchill; chronological files of outgoing correspondence and in 
ternal memoranda; files relating to construction projects, including 
copies of contracts, specifications, correspondence, technical submit 
tals, and related materials: records relating to planning efforts: and 
miscellaneous materials. The material is presently unorganized, al 
though most files arc in their original folders. 

Audiovisual Material: Includes photographic prints, negatives, and 

transparencies taken by or lor the National Park Sen ice in the period 
since 1974. Most of the material relates to construction projects and 
to public events, and includes photographs submitted for potential 



1181 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



use in the park's information bulletin, The Broadside. The collection 
is currently unorganized. 

Material relating to the relocation of the Navy Yard Boundary Wall 
includes approximately 16 hours of 8-millimeter sound motion pic- 
tures of the project. 

Related Material: Material relating to construction projects, particu- 
larly plans and specifications and completion reports, is found in the 
park Technical Information Collection. 

Section 106 Case Files 

Textual Records: Includes correspondence, memoranda, and other docu- 
ments relating to review of proposed actions by the park and its 
cooperators under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation 
Act of 1966. The files are arranged chronologically by year and there- 
under by serial number. 

Technical Information Collection 

Scope: Includes architectural drawings; historical and technical reports, 
contract specifications, completion reports, and other documents; and 
photographic prints and slides of the Charlestown Navy Yard and 
other sites within Boston National Historical Park. The materials are 
arranged numerically by the drawing or document number assigned to 
them in accordance with NPS Director's Order 10B, Drawing and 
Map Numbers. 

Textual Records: Includes originals and copies of historical and techni- 
cal reports, contract specifications, completion reports, and other docu- 
ments relating to the management and treatment of the yard and its 
resources by the Boston Redevelopment Authority and the National 
Park Service. 

Architectural and Engineering Plans: Includes originals and copies of 
architectural and engineering drawings relating to projects undertaken 
by the National Park Service, Boston Redevelopment Authority, U.S. 
Navy, and others, primarily in the period since 1974. 

Related Material: Most of the items in the collection are available on 
microfiche through the National Park Service Technical Information 
Center located at the Denver Service Center, Denver, Colo. 

Finding Aids: Most of the documentary material in the collection is 
indexed in the National Park Service's Northeast Region Cultural Re- 
sources Bibliography (CRBIB) database [http://nercrbib.nps.gov/cwis/ 
SPT-Home.phpl. Both documentary material and architectural and 
engineering drawings are indexed in the Denver Service Center's Tech- 
nical Information Center (TIC) database [http://etic.nps.gov]. 

Boston National Historical Park 

Museum Collection 

Building 107, Charlestown Navy Yard 
Boston, Mass. 

Scope: Includes archeological materials: architectural fragments; books 
and documents; certificates: chainmaking dies; display boards: foundry 
patterns; furniture; machinery for chainmaking. ropemaking. and other 
industrial processes; models; paintings and drawings; pins and medals: 
plaques; safety equipment such as shoes and hardhats: samples of 
chain, rope, and other products; signs; tools; and other material objects 
related to the history and operation of the Boston Naval Shipyard. 
Machinery for the Chain Forge remains in situ in the Chain Forge; 
most of the other material is in storage. The bulk of the collection 
consists of materials acquired either by transfer from the Navy or field 
collection: oilier materials have been acquired from private individuals 
and organizations. Some material is on loan from the Naval Historical 
Center, 



NPS Cat. No.: Each artifact in the collection is individually cataloged. 
Catalog records have been entered into and are searchable through the 
NPS Automated National Catalog System (ANCS Plus). 

National Archives & Records Administration 
National Archives 

College Park. Md. & Washington, D.C. 

Location Note: In general. 19th century records are located in the Na- 
tional Archives Building (Archives I) in Washington, D.C. while 20th 
century records and audiovisual materials are located in the National 
Archives (Archives II) at College Park, Md. 

Related Material: Records located in the National Archives-Northeast 
Region (Boston), although part of the same record groups, are de- 
scribed under that heading. 

Record Group 19 
Records of the Bureau of Ships, 1794 1972 

Textual Records: (19.2) Records of the Bureau of Construction, Equip- 
ment, and Repairs, 1820-1862: Letters received from the Boston Navy 
Yard, Sept. -Dec. 1861. (19.3) Records of the Bureau of Construction 
and Repair, 1794-1941: Letters sent. 1850-1880; letters received. 1861- 
1882, 1885-1886; general correspondence. 1887-1940. with registers. 
1890-1895, history cards, 1896-1925. and indexes, 1896-1925; mis- 
cellaneous correspondence, 1887-1912. (19.4) Records of the Bureau 
of Engineering, 1840-1942: Letters sent. 1861-1890; letters and re- 
ports received. 1861-1872; letters sent and received. 1888-1910. with 
indexes: register of letters received, 1881-1888: general correspon- 
dence. 1885-1887, 1910-1940. (19.5) Records of the Bureau of Equip- 
ment, 1875-1917: General correspondence, 1899-1910. with registers, 
1891-1896, 1899-1906. and indexes. 1875-1883. 1891-1910. (19.8) 
Records of the Bureau of Ships, 1794-1972: General correspondence. 
1940-1945; unclassified general correspondence. 1946-1966: confi- 
dential general correspondence. 1947-1961; secret general correspon- 
dence. 1915-1965. 

Architectural and Engineering Plans: (19.3.3) Plans of ships and 
stations, 1794-1910, with related card indexes. 

Audiovisual Material: (19.3.1, 19-A series) Photographic prints of 
U.S. Navy vessels; ship damage and repair: interior and exterior views 
of decks, quarters, and fittings; shops and facilities at navy yards. 
(19.8.4, 19-N series) General photographic file of the Bureau of Ships, 
documenting the history of the U.S. Navy, and including views of U.S. 
Navy vessels: construction and launching of ships: construction facili- 
ties; sailors, officers, Navy Department officials, and noted individu- 
als; and nautical artworks. (19.12. 19-E series) Views of Boston Navy 
Yard. 

Related Material: Original prints and negatives of many photographs 
are found in the Boston Naval Shipyard Photo Collection in the Bos- 
ton National Historical Park Archives. Copies of many photographs 
are found in the collections of the Naval Historical Center. Copy 
prints of many Boston-related images are held by Boston National 
Historical Park. 

Finding Aids: Elizabeth Bethel. Ellmore A. Champie, Mabel E. Deutrich. 
Robert W. Krauskopf. and Mark N. Schatz, comps.. Preliminary In- 
ventory of die Ret (nils of die Bureau of Ships. Preliminary Inventory 
133 (1961); Harry Schwartz, comp.. Supplement to Preliminary lth 
\entot\ No. 133. Records of the Bureau of Ships, NM 58 (1965).' The 
National Archives also holds a vessel name/hull number index to pho- 
tographic series N. 



1182 



Appendix C, Navy Yard Collections 



Navy Yard Artifacts: A Gallery 



THE MUSEUM COLLECTION of Boston National Historical Park and badges. This gallery presents a selection of images of artifacts, 
contains a wide variety of artifacts relating to the Charlestown Navy some of which are included in the permanent Navy Yard exhibit in 
Yard. These range from large pieces of machinery to signs to pins the new Navy Yard Visitor Center in Building 5. 




The collection includes everything from large pieces of machinery such as the drop hammer, still in situ in Building 1 05, seen at left, to buttons and badges 
such as those seen in the collage at right. Stephen P. Carlson, BNHP(left); Brooke A. Childrey, BNHP (right) 




This eagle figurehead was removed from USS Nightingale, a vessel taken 
over by the Navy during the Civil War. Carol A. Manson. BNHP 

This tool box had belonged to Alfred Ells ( 1 81 7-1 895), a joiner who worked 
in the Navy Yard in the 1 870s and 1 880s. Brooke A. Childrey, BNHP 



I I83 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Navy Yard Artifacts: A Gallery 





In^. .jJnf 


— — — — — i i 



■ 




The collection includes a variety of ship plaques which had been pre- 
sented to the Navy Yard by visiting ships. From left to right, the ships 
represented here are HMCS Okanagan (SS-74), USS John King (DDG-3), 
and USS Aeolus (ARC-3). BNHP 




In addition to archival materials relating to ships built at the Navy Yard, the 
collection includes items such as the christening bottle cover from the 
launch of USS Hudson (DD-475) in its original presentation box. 

Brooke A. Childrey, BNHP 




The collection includes a large sam- 
pling of patterns used to create ev- 
erything from manhole covers for 
yard roadways to specialized components for ships. At left is a shoe 
pattern for the main shaft of HMS Queen Mary, while at right is one of 
hundreds of gear patterns. Brooke A. Childrey, BNHP 






Not all items in the collection were 
either transferred from the Navy or 
found by park curators in yard build- 
ings. Some came from former ship- 
yard workers. Among the personal 
items which have been donated to 
the park are hard hats (upper left), 
safety shoes (above), and uniforms 
(left). Brooke A. Childrey. BNHP 



MINIMUM 
P ENALTIE S 

%r 'failure to Wear 
SAFETY EQUIPMENT 

'' ntfs Safffy (roQjtrs - 

or Toe Caps) 

hust offiMf urns or cauvon 
steam " ifrm or aemmAMD 
third * mm «n susfzMSiat 
fietmm ■ rtM am suspmsmi 

fIFTH • -PFMOVAL- 

ITS UP TO YOU / 




MASTER MECHANICS OFHCE 

Planning Quartermen Leadingmen 

LOCKSMITH SAW FILER 



Signs come in all shapes and forms. These include ones imparting informa- 
tion to employees (top left), the Indian bust from the National Shawmut Bank 
sign on Building 32 (top right), and building identification and directional 
signage such as the one above from Building 1 07. 

Brooke A. Childrey. BNHP (top): Stephen P. Carlson. BNHP (above) 



The collection includes a variety of carts used by employees to move tools 
and materials around the yard. This cart had belonged to the Rigging Loft. 

Brooke A. Childrey. BNHP 



I I 84 



Appendix C, Navy Yard Collections 



Record Group 45 

Naval Records Collection of the 

Office of Naval Records and Library 

Textual Records: (45.2) Records of the Office of the Secretary of the 
Navy, 1798-1913: Letters sent, 1798-1886: confidential letters sent, 
1861-1875: uncoded versions of letters sent in cipher, 1888-1910; 
letters received, 1801-1886; decoded versions of letters received in 
cipher, 1888-1910; issuances, 1798-1913, with gaps. (45.3) Records 
of the Board of Navy Commissioners, 1794-1843: Official journal of 
the board, 1815-1842, with a register, 1825-1842; letters sent, 1815- 
1842, with a register. 1817-1842; letters received, 1814-1842; reports 
from the Chief Naval Constructor, 1827-1834; contracts, 1794-1842; 
inventories of naval stores in navy yards, 1814-1816, 1825-1843, and 
in shore establishments. 1819-1842; navy yard budget estimates, 1835- 
1836. (45.4.1) Records of the Bureau of Yards and Docks: History of 
the Boston Navy Yard. 1 797-1874, by Commodore George Henry Preble. 
1875. (45.6) Records of Naval Shore Establishments, 1812-1919: 
Correspondence, orders, logs, and miscellaneous records of the 
Charlestown (Boston) Navy Yard, 1814-1867. 

Architectural and Engineering Plans: (45.6) Sail plan profiles and 
other ship plans drawn by sailmaker Charles Ware at Charlestown 
(Boston) Navy Yard, and by others, 1812-1854. (35 items) 

Audiovisual Material: (45.4.1) Photographs of the Navy Yard in 1874 
are included within Preble's manuscript history. 

Microfilm Publications: The following National Archives microfilm 
publications include relevant series of records: 

M - 1 1 8 History of the Boston Navy Yard, 1 797-1874, by Commo- 
dore George Henry Preble 

M- 1 24 Letters Received by the Secretary of the Navy: Miscella- 
neous Letters. '1801-1884 

M- 1 25 Letters Received by the Secretary of the Navy: Captains ' 
Letters. 1805-1861. 1866-1885, 1805-1885 

M - 1 4 7 Letters Received by the Secretary of the Na vy from Com- 
manders. 1804-1886 

M-149 Letters Sent by the Secretary of the Navy to Officers. 1798- 
1868 

M-44 1 Letters Sent by the Secretary of the Navy to Comman- 
dants and Navy Agents, 1808-1865 

M - 4 7 2 L etters Sent by the Secretary of the Na vy to the President 
and Executive Agencies. 1821-1886 

M - 4 8 L etters Sent by the Secretary of the Na vy to Chiefs ofNa vy 
Bureaus. 1842-1886 

M-5 1 7 Letters Received by the Secretary of the Navy from the 
President and Executive Agencies, 1837-1886 

M - 5 1 8 L etters Received b y the Secretary of the Na vy from Chiefs 
ofNa vy Bureaus, 1 842- 1 885 

M - 5 2 8 L etters Received by the Secretary of the Na vy from Na vy 
Agents and Naval Storekeepers. 1843-1865 

T-829 Miscellaneous Records of the Office of Naval Records 
and Library 

Related Material: For post- 1885 records of the Department of the 
Navy, see General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1798-1947 
(RG 80) and General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1947- 
(RG 428) at the National Archives. 

Materials relating to Preble's work on the yard history, including other 
manuscript versions, are found in the George Henry Preble Papers at 
both the Massachusetts Historical Society and the New England His 
toric Genealogical Society. 

The primary collection of records of the Bureau of Yards and Docks is 
in the Records of the Bureau of Yards and Docks (RG 71) at the 

National Archives. 



The principal collection of records of the Boston Navy Yard is in the 
Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments (RG 181) in the 
National Archives- Northeast Region (Boston). Additional records of 
the Boston Naval Shipyard are in the Records of the Boston Naval 
Shipyard (RG 1) in the Boston National Historical Park Archives. 

Finding Aids: James R. Masterson, comp.. Preliminary Checklist of the 
Naval Records Collection of the Office of Naval Records and Library. 
PC 30 (1945). 

Record Group 71 
Records of the Bureau of Yards and Docks 

Textual Records: (71.2) General Records: Letters sent, 1842-1911; 
letters received. 1842-1885; general correspondence, 1886-1942; gen- 
eral correspondence relating to shore establishments, 1916-1925; shore 
establishment payrolls, 1844-1899; annual reports of estimates and 
expenditures, 1836-1837, 1842-1911 .annual estimates for public works 
projects, 1921-1940; reports of work done to improve yards, 1842- 
1898; semimonthly abstracts of work done, 1843-1867; Boston Rope- 
walk reports, 1842-1850. 

Architectural and Engineering Plans: (71.2.4) Plans, drawings, blue- 
prints, and tracings ("dash" files) of U.S. Navy shore facilities and 
equipment in the United States and abroad, 1824-1963 (102,618 items); 
microfilm copies of shore facilities, 1876-1941 (1,224 rolls). 

Audiovisual Material: (71.6) Construction progress at naval shore 
establishments in the United States, its possessions, and abroad, in- 
cluding navy yards, air stations, submarine bases, coaling stations, and 
training stations, 1876-1944. (172,606 images) 

Microfilm Publications: The following National Archives microfilm 
publications include relevant series of records: 

Ml 099 Annual Reports of the Department of the Navy. 1822- 

1866 
T-1023 Plans of Buildings and Machinery Erected in the Navy 

Yard. Boston. 1830-1840 

Related Material: Color transparencies of the drawings included in 
Microfilm Publication T-1023 ("Parris Portfolio") are held by Boston 
National Historical Park. 

Finding Aids: Richard G. Wood, comp.. Preliminary Inventory of the 
Records of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, PI 10 (1948): Harry Schwartz, 
comp., Supplement to Preliminary Inventory No. 10, Records of the 
Bureau of Yards and Docks,, NM 46 (1965)." 

Record Group 80 
General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1798-1947 

Textual Records: (80.2.1) General Records: Letters sent, 1858-1886; 
general correspondence. 1885-1940: indexes and registers, 1862-1947: 
records of the Commission on Navy Yards and Naval Stations. 1916- 
1919. (80.2.3) Records Relating to Personnel: Returns and other records 
relating to civilian employees at shore establishments. 1887-1939. 

Audiovisual Material: (80.11, G, GK, CF series) Officers and enlisted 
men; Navy Department personnel; aircraft, ships, and boats; ord- 
nance: training activities: air stations, bases, and navy yards; harbors 
and docks; foreign navies and dignitaries; naval operations during World 
War II and the Korean War; expeditions and surveys: and tests, includ 
ing nuclear bomb tests, ca. 1900-57 (750.000 images). 

Microfilm Publications: The following National Archives microfilm 
publications include relevant series of records: 

M1052 General and Special Indexes to the General ( onespon- 
dence of the Office of the Secret. ir\ ol the Navy, July 
1897 Aug. 1926 



1185 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



M 1 6 7 Name and Subject Index to the General Correspondence 

of the Office of the Secretary of the Navy. 1930-1942 
M 1 9 2 Indexes and Subject Cards to the 'Secret and Confide m 

tial ' Correspondence of the Office of the Secretary of 

the Navy Mar 1917 - July 1919 
M 1 1 40 Secret and Confidential Correspondence of the Office of 

the Chief of Naval Operations and the Office of the 

Secretary of the Navy 1919-1927 
M 1 1 4 1 Indexes and Register to the Correspondence of the Office 

of the Chief of Naval Operations and the Office of the 

Secretary of the Navy. 1919-1927 

Related Material: Post- 1947 records of the Department of the Navy 
are in Record Group 428. Original prints and negatives of many 
photographs are found in the Boston Naval Shipyard Photo Collection 
in the Boston National Historical Park Archives. Copies of many 
photographs are found in the collections of the Naval Historical Cen- 
ter. Copy prints of many Boston-related images are held by Boston 
National Historical Park. 

Finding Aids: James R. Masterson, comp., Preliminary Checklist of the 
General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1804-1944, PC 31 
(1945). 

Record Group 127 
Records of the U.S. Marine Corps 

Textual Records: (127.2) Records of The Office of the Commandant, 
1798-1978: Letters sent. 1798-1801, 1804-1911, with indexes. 1848- 
1904: letters received, 1799-1903; general correspondence, 1904-1938, 
with indexes and synopsis cards, 1904-1912; general correspondence. 
1939-1950; orders issued and received, 1798-1886. 

Finding Aids: Maizie Johnson, comp.. Inventory of the Records of the 
United States Marine Corps, Inventory Series 2 (1970). 

Record Group 428 
General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1947- 

Audiovisual Material: (428.2.2, GX, K, KN. N series) Still Photo- 
graphs: Navy officers and enlisted men; aircraft, ships, and boats; 
ordnance and other equipment; training activities and facilities; bases: 
geographical areas; navy operations during the Vietnam War; and other 
subjects relating to U.S. Navy history, 1955-1981 (379,000 images). 

Related Material: Pre- 1947 records of the Department of the Navy are 
in Record Groups 45 and 80. Original prints and negatives of many 
photographs are found in the Boston Naval Shipyard Photo Collection 
in the Boston National Historical Park Archives. Copies of many 
photographs are found in the collections of the Naval Historical Cen- 
ter. Copy prints of many Boston-related images are held by Boston 
National Historical Park. 

National Archives-Northeast Region (Boston) 

Waltham, Mass. 

Scope: Includes records of federal agencies created primarily by offices 
located in Boston and eastern New England. Many of these records 
were originally at the National Archives in Washington. 

Related Material: Records located in the National Archives in Washing- 
ion, although part of the same record groups, are described under that 
heading. 

Record Group 32 
Records of the U.S. Shipping Board 

Textual Records: (32.5.12) Records of the Boston District Office. 1921 
1933. relating to leasing and maintaining piers, docking and berthing 
vessels, and storing cargo and equipment at the Boston Army Base. 



Finding Aids: See Entries 519-522 in Forrest R. Holdcamper. comp., 
Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the United States Shipping 
Board, PI 97 (1956).' 

Record Group 71 
Records of the Bureau of Yards and Docks 

Textual Records: (71.2.5) Journals of daily transactions at the Boston 
Navy Yard. 1833-1834, 1836-1843, 1849-1850. 

Related Material: Additional journals and logs are to be found in the 
Records of the Boston Navy Yard in RG 181.3.1 in the National 
Archives-Northeast Region (Boston) and in the Records of the Bos- 
ton Naval Shipyard in RG 1 in the Boston National Historical Park 
Archives. 

Finding Aids: See Entry 91 in Richard C. Wood, comp.. Preliminary 
Inventory of the Records of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, PI 10 

(1948). 

Record Group 92 
Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General 

Textual Records: (92.15.5) Records of the Boston Quartermaster De- 
pot, 1918-1922, 1941-1947. 

Architectural and Engineering Plans: (92.7.1) Utility Atlas. Army 
Supply Base, Boston. (162 items) 

Finding Aids: Maizie H. Johnson, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the 
Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, NM 81 (1967); 
Maizie H. Johnson, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the 
Office of the Quartermaster General. Part II. NM 85 (1967). 

Record Group 127 
Records of the U.S. Marine Corps 

Textual Records: (127.7.2) Records of the Marine Barracks at Boston, 
Mass., 1828-1938, consisting of letters sent, 1828-1912. with gaps: 
letters received, 1896-1913: orders. 1867-1905; muster rolls, 1825- 
1911. with gaps; reports, 1815-1913, 1937-38: and records of sum- 
mary courts-martial, 1870-1875. 

Finding Aids: Fred G Halley, comp., Preliminary Checklist of the Records 
of the United States Marine Corps. 1798-1944, PC 50 (Sept. 1946). 

Record Group 181 

Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, 

1784-1996 

181.2 Records of Naval Districts, 1903-1968 
181.2.1 Records of the 1st Naval District (Boston. MA) 

Textual Records: Records of the Office of the Commandant, including 
letters sent. 1903-1904: general correspondence. 1925-1958: corre- 
spondence concerning ships, 1939-1940. Records of the Office of the 
Assistant Chief of Staff (Operations), including general correspon- 
dence, 1942-1955; geographic files. 1940-1945. war diaries. 1942-1945, 
and logs, 1942-1946. of the Operations Officer; and general corre- 
spondence of the Aviation Officer, 1944-1945. Records of the Office 
of the Assistant Chief of Staff (Administration) . including general cor- 
respondence. 1946-1961. Records of the Historical Officer, including 
copies of Administrati\ e History of the First Naval District in World 
War If. historical data pertaining to the First Naval District. 1946: and 
a daily historical log, 1941-1945. General correspondence of the Dis- 
trict Director of the Naval Reserve. 1946-1 950. Records of the Public 
Information Officer. 1944-1950. Records of the Office of the Assis- 
tant Chief of St, iff (Personnel), including general correspondence of 
the District Personnel Officer. 1927- 1936; investigative files of the 
Director of Naval Officer Procurement, 1941 1943; and general corre- 
spondence of the Director of Training. 1942-1949. General corre- 



1186 



Appendix C, Navy Yard Collections 



spondence of the Industrial Manager, 1951-1965. Program correspon- 
dence of the Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion, and Repair, 1 966- 
1967. General correspondence, 1941-1946. and real estate files, 1941- 
1952, of the Public Works Office. Records of the Port Director, Bos- 
ton, MA, including correspondence, 1942-1946; vessel acquisition, 
inspection, and disposition files, 1940-1947: routing instructions, 1941- 
1946; convoy sailing orders and related records, 1941-1946; and pier 
office station logs, 1943-1945. 

Audiovisual Material: Public Works Office photographic file of naval 
shore facilities in New England, 1939-1947 (775 images). 

Related Material: Additional records of the First Naval District are in 
the Boston National Historical Park Archives (RG 2). 

Finding Aids: Records of the U.S. Navy (RG 181) at NARA Northeast 
Region-Boston (n .d.) [http://www.archives.gov/northeast/boston/find- 
ing-aids/navy-records.pdf] A more detailed finding aid is available at 
the National Archives-Northeast Region. A copy of this document is 
held by Boston National Historical Park Division of Cultural Re- 
sources. 

181.3 Records of Navy Yards, 1784-1985 
181.3.1 Records of the Boston Navy Yard (Boston, MA) 

Textual Records: Records of the Office of the Commandant, including 
letters sent, 1825-1908; letters received, 1823-1908; general corre- 
spondence, 1909-1967; correspondence concerning ships, 1938-1946; 
issuances, 1836-1913; station logs, 1888-1958; daily journals of yard 
activity, 1815-1846; records relating to personnel, 1846-1911; and 
construction contracts and other fiscal records, 1823-1913. Records of 
the Industrial Relations Office, including historical files, 1956-1973. 
and the shipyard newspaper, Boston Naval Shipyard News, published 
by the Employee Services Division, 1936-1974. Letters sent and re- 
ceived by the Office of the Naval Storekeeper, 1842-1867. Records of 
the Ordnance Office. 1871-1891. Historical files, 1940-1973, and daily 
journal of events, 1815-1832, 1842-1846. of the Office of Public Rela- 
tions. Records of the Chief Engineer, Department of Steam Engineer- 
ing, including letters sent and received, 1865-1910, General correspon- 
dence. 1898-1912, monthly reports, 1869-1909, property records, 
1863-1900, and muster and time books, 1864-1883. Records of the 
Department of Yards and Docks, including Records of the Captain of 
the Yard, 1852-1922, and Civil Engineer, 1861-1911. 

Architectural and Engineering Plans: Department of Steam Engineer- 
ing files of plans and tracings prepared or used by the "drawing room" 
or machine shop, for vessels constructed, repaired, or overhauled at 
the Boston Navy Yard; buildings and shops at the yard; and equipment 
used at the yard or installed aboard vessels, 1856-1 892 (1.348 items) . 

Related Material: Several of the series identified as part of Record 
Group 181.3.1 are physically located at the Boston National Histori- 
cal Park Archives (RG 1 ) . Additional records of the Boston Navy Yard 
are found in the Boston National Historical Park Archives (RG 1). 

Finding Aids: Richard C. Wood, Preliminary Checklist of the Records of 
the Boston Navy Yard. 1811-1942, PC 40 (Mar. 1946) ; Records of the 
U.S. Navy (RG 181) at NARA Northeast Region-Boston (n.d.) [http:// 
www.archives.gov/northeast/boston/finding-aids/navy-records.pdf] A 
more detailed finding aid is available at the National Archives-North- 
east Region. A copy of this document is held by Boston National 
Historical Park Division of Cultural Resources. 

Record Group 336 
Records of the Office of the Chief of Transportation 

Textual Records: (336.3.1) Records of Port of Embarkation, Boston. 
Mass.. 1941-1946. 



Boston Athenaeum 
The Charles E. Mason, Jr., Print Room 

Boston, Mass. 

Audiovisual Material: Includes an 1837 view of the Navy Yard from 
Bunker Hill; wood engravings of the Navy Yard in the 19th century 
detached from Gleason s Pictorial and other publications; a watercolor 
rendering of the Machine Shop "Great Chimney"; photographs of the 
Navy Yard, including USS Katahdin in Dry Dock 1 , 1 895; and a series 
of five watercolors by Allan Rohan Crite depicting the Charlestown 
Navy Yard during World War II. 

Related Material: Navy copy prints of material from Gleason s Picto- 
rial are in the Boston Naval Shipyard Photo Collection in the Boston 
National Historical Park Archives. Copy prints of other images are 
held by Boston National Historical Park. 

Boston College 
John J. Burns Library 

Boston, Mass. 
Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. Papers, 1912-1994 

Textual Records: Alphabetical topic files containing correspondence, 
publications, clippings, and other material relating to the Boston Army 
Base, 1954; Boston Historical Sites, 1956-1957: and Boston Naval 
Shipyard, 1953-1978. 

Boston Globe 

Library 
Boston, Mass. 

Audiovisual Material: The photo morgue of The Boston Globe includes 
images showing work on Building 40 and Dry Dock 2, 1902-1904; the 
Navy Yard waterfront, 1923; President Franklin D. Roosevelt's 1941 
visit to the Navy Yard; and employees during World War II, 1941- 
1943. 



Related Material: 

Park. 



Copy prints are held by Boston National Historical 

Boston Public Library 

Boston, Mass. 

Print Department 
Boston Pictorial Archive 

Audiovisual Material: Negatives and prints, including stereo cards, of 
photographs depicting the Navy Yard. USS Constitution, the South 
Boston Annex, and other related subjects. 

Related Material: Copy prints and digital copies of stereo images of 
Navy Yard-related items are held by Boston National Historical Park. 
Most of the copy prints were donated by the late Al Schroeder and are 
presumed to be from this collection but could be from other collections 
held by the Print Department (particularly the Herald-Traveler Photo 
Morgue and the Leslie Jones Collection). 

Leslie Jones Collection 

Audiovisual Material: Negatives and prints of photographs taken by 
Boston Herald-Travelci photographer Leslie Jones between 1917 and 
1956. Among the Navy Yard-related views in the collection are views 
of the remains of the Acetylene Plant (Building 165) following the 
Nov. 1934 explosion that destroyed the facility. 

Related Material: Copies of some images obtained by the Navy are 
found in the Boston Navy Yard Photo Collection in the Boston Na- 
tional Historical Park Archives. Copy prints of other photographs are 
held by Boston National Historical Park. 



1187 



Rare Book Department 
Richard D. Harris Papers, 1820-1840 

Textual Records: Includes materials relating to claims to land occupied 
by the Charlestown Navy Yard. 

Related Material: Additional papers relating to the Harris claim are 
found in the Charlestown (Mass.) Papers II in the Massachusetts 
Historical Society. 

Boston Redevelopment Authority 
Economic Development & Industrial Corp. 

Boston Marine Industrial Park 
South Boston, Mass. 

Records Relating to the Boston Marine Industrial Park 

Scope: Includes architectural drawings and other material relating to the 
South Boston Annex of the Boston Naval Shipyard; the Boston Army 
Supply Base; and the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 

Textual Records: Includes original U.S. Army Quartermaster Depart- 
ment record books relating to the construction and maintenance of the 
Boston Army Supply Base; miscellaneous documents, clippings, and 
other materials relating to the conversion of the South Boston Annex 
and the Boston Army Base into the Boston Marine Industrial Park, 
including a log of dockings in Dry Dock 3 from 1978 to 1992. 

Architectural and Engineering Plans: Original U.S. Navy and U.S. 
Army plans relating to buildings and structures of the South Boston 
Annex and the Boston Army Supply Base; plans prepared by the 
EDIC and BRA for the development of the Boston Marine Industrial 
Park; and plans prepared by tenants of the Boston Marine Industrial 
Park. Material is arranged by building or subject. 

Audiovisual Material: Includes miscellaneous historic and contempo- 
rary photographs of the South Boston Annex, the Boston Army Base, 
and the Boston Marine Industrial Park. 

Related Material: Additional architectual and engineering plans of the 
South Boston Annex are in the Records of the Boston Naval Shipyard 
(RG 1.4) in the Boston National Historical Park Archives. 

Finding Aids: The card file index held by Boston NHP lists original U.S. 
Navy plans relating to South Boston. 

The Bostonian Society 

Old State House 
Boston, Mass. 

Arthur Hansen Photograph Collection 

Audiovisual Material: Includes a photograph of the ruins of Building 
1 65 following its destruction in a 1 935 explosion and various images of 
USS Constitution ( 1 935- 1 950). 

Charlestown Navy Yard Reports, 1843-1853 

Textual Records: One volume containing semi-monthly reports on the 
progress of work done by the Painters Department of the Navy Yard 
between 1843 and 1853. 

Donald LaPointe Photograph Collection, 1923-1936 

Audiovisual Material: Includes images relating to the restoration of 
USS Constitution during the 1 920s. 

Quarterman Joiner George W. Burroughs is seen in his office in the Joiner 
Shop in Building 36 in Dec. 1897. Born in 1849, he began working in the 
yard in 1892, and was appointed Master Ship Joiner on July 7, 1899. He 
retired in 1 923. Burroughs Collection. Bostonian Society 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 
Illustrated Boston Lantern Slide Collection, 1888 

Audiovisual Material: Includes two images of the Navy Yard water- 
front. 

Letters and Testimonials of George W. Burroughs, 
1871-1923 

Textual Records: Includes miscellaneous items relating to the career of 
Master Ship Joiner George W. Burroughs. 

Audiovisual Material: Includes numerous images of buildings and ac- 
tivities at the Navy Yard (especially of the Joiner Shop) collected or 
taken by George W. Burroughs. 

Related Material: Many of the images in the Burroughs Collection are 
also found in the Boston Naval Shipyard Photograph Collection and in 
the Army Center for Military History at Carlisle Barracks. Copy 
prints are held by Boston National Historical Park. 

Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum 

St. Michaels, Md. 

Audiovisual Material: Includes three images of USS Maryland (CA-8) 
being brought into Dry Dock 2 on Aug. 12, 1905. 

Related Material: Copy prints are held by Boston National Historical 
Park. 

Harvard University 
Baker Library 

Harvard Business School 
Brighton, Mass. 

Baldwin Collection (Baldwin Family Papers, 1724-1880) 

Textual Records: Papers of Loammi Baldwin II relating to the 

Charlestown and Norfolk Navy Yards. 

Related Material: Additional Baldwin papers are found in the Institute 
Archives and Special Collections, M.I.T. Libraries, Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology; Peabody Essex Museum; University of Michi- 
gan Libraries; and The Winterthur Library. 

Historic New England 

(Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities) 
Boston, Mass. 

Audiovisual Material: Includes images relating to the Charlestown Navy 
Yard, primarily from the late 19th century, primarily in the form of 
stereo cards. 




1188 



Appendix C, Navy Yard Collections 



Related Material: Copy prints of many items are held by Boston 
National Historical Park. Several items are duplicates of photographs 
found in other collections. 

John Fitzgerald Kennedy Library 

Boston, Mass. 

Josiah Johnson Hawes Photographs, 1863-1897 

Audiovisual Material: Four photographs (Image No. 267 [2 items], 
268-269) of the Navy Yard taken by Southworth and Hawes in 1881. 



Related Material: 

Park. 



Copy prints are held by Boston National Historical 



Library of Congress 

Washington, D.C. 

Manuscript Division 

Papers of Daniel Dodge Brodhead, 1821-1853 

Textual Records: Bound correspondence, account book, business records, 
and miscellaneous unbound papers chiefly relating to Brodhead 's work 
as Navy Agent in Boston, Mass. 

Related Material: One volume of correspondence for 1830-1833 is part 
of Navy Agent in Boston Papers in the Boston Naval Shipyard Re- 
lated Collections (RG 2) in the Boston National Historical Park Ar- 
chives. 

Papers of John Shaw, 1798 1895 

Textual Records: Correspondence (official and private), journal, note- 
books, reports, biographical data, and miscellany relating to the ser- 
vice of Capt. John Shaw (1773-1823) at the Boston Navy Yard, 1819- 
1822. 

Papers of Morton L. Deyo, 1911-1981 

Textual Records: Includes papers of Vice Adm. Morton L. Deyo (1887- 
1973) as Commandant, First Naval District, 1946-1949. 

Papers of William Leverreth Hudson, 1821 1889 

Textual Records: Includes papers of Capt. William L. Hudson (1794- 
1862) relating to his service as commandant of the Boston Navy Yard. 

Records of the Charlestown Navy Yard, 1801-1805 

Textual Records: Includes payroll lists for carpenters, laborers, and 
mastmakers. (15 items) 




Prints & Photographs Division 
Boston Naval Shipyard 

Audiovisual Material: Ten images of the Ropewalk, Buildings 105 and 
106, and Dry Docks 1 and 2 taken for the Charlestown Preservation 
Society by James Bailey between Mar. and Aug. 1974. 

Detroit Publishing Company Collection 

Audiovisual Material: Approximately 20 images of the Navy Yard 
waterfront, USS Maryland 'in Dry Dock 2, and USS Constitution dat- 
ing from the period 1900-1910. 

Related Material: Many of the images were used to produce hand- 
colored postcards. Copies of some of these cards are in the Boston 
National Historical Park Museum Collection. 

Finding Aids: The Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Reading 
Room website includes an overview of the collection [http:// 
www.loc.gov/rr/print/coll/202_detr.html] . Digitized images are avail- 
able through the website search engine. 

Historic American Buildings Survey 
Historic American Engineering Record 

Scope: The following is a listing of HABS/H AER documentation relating 
to the Charlestown Navy Yard which has been processed and trans- 
ferred to the Library of Congress by the National Park Service. The 
HABS projects include measured drawings, while the HAER projects 
include only photographs and data sheets. The HABS documentation 
and HAER images/caption sheets have been digitized and are available 
through the website search engine. 

HABS MA-2-10 Commandant's House 

HABS MA- 1247- A Ropewalk & Tar House (Buildings 58 & 60) 

HAER MA-90 Charlestown Navy Yard 

HAER MA-90-7 Pier 10 

HAER MA-90-30 Shipfitters' Shop (Building 104) 

HAER MA-90-34 Central Power Plant (Building 1 08) 

HAER MA-90-50 Incinerator (Building 203) 

HAER MA-90-62 Oxygen Plant (Building 277) 

HAER MA-90-67 Pier 9 

HAER MA-90-68 Pier 1 1 

HAER MA-90-69 Marine Railway 

Marine Corps History Division 

Quantico, Va. 

Audiovisual Material: Approximately 12 photographs of the Marine 
Barracks and Marines at the Navy Yard. 

Related Material: Copy prints are held by Boston National Historical 
Park. Several items are duplicates of photographs in the Boston Naval 
Shipyard Photo Collection in the Boston National Historical Park 
Archives. 

Massachusetts Historical Society 

Boston, Mass. 

Charlestown (Mass.) Papers II, 1734 1840 

Textual Records: Papers relating (o Charlestown, Mass., particularly to 
the Harris family and the efforts of the heirs of John Harris to obtain 



The Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) was a New Deal program 
which provided employment for architects. Run by the National Park Ser- 
vice, HABS deposited its final products in the Library of Congress. This 
drawing of the Commandant's House is part of a seven-sheet set of mea- 
sured drawings of the house prepared by Paul J. Franklin of Needham, 
Mass., between Jan. and July 1934. LC HABS MA-2-10 



1189 



compensation for lands they claimed within the boundaries of the 
Charlestown Navy Yard. 

Related Material: Additional papers relating to the Harris claim are 
found in the Richard D. Harris Papers in the Boston Public Library. 

George Henry Preble Papers, 1729-1926 

Textual Records: Research material collected by Preble for writings on 
the history of the Boston Navy Yard. 

Related Material: Additional material relating to Preble's work on the 
history of the Navy Yard is found in the George Henry Preble Papers 
at the New England Historical Genealogical Society. The final official 
copy of the history is found in the National Archives (RG 45). 

U.S. Naval Hospital (Chelsea, Mass.) Letterbook, 

1832 1839 

Textual Records: Letterbook containing copies of letters to and from 
Alexander Parris as superintendent of the U.S. Naval Hospital in 
Chelsea, Mass. Includes material relating to his work on the Dry Dock 
and other projects at the Charlestown Navy Yard. 

Related Material: The letterbook is available on-line as a part of the 
Alexander Parris Digital Project of the State Library of Massachu- 
setts. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Francis Russell Hart Nautical Collection 

M.I.T. Museum 

Bethlehem Steel Corporation 

Audiovisual Materials: Includes 14 images of the Navy Yard taken 
during Navy Day, May 13, 1916. 

Related Material: Copy prints are held by Boston National Historical 
Park (NPS Cat. No. BOSTS-7629). 

Institute Archives and Special Collections 

M.I.T. Libraries 

Loammi Baldwin Papers, 1780-1838 

Textural Records: Correspondence, reports, tide tables, cost estimates, 
drawings, notes, computations, and court records relating to design 
and construction of dry docks at Charlestown and Gosport (Norfolk). 
Includes volumes of payroll records, summaries by workers' trades, a 
register of invoices, measurements of stone, a register of pile-driving, 
and a diary of Baldwin's activities in Charlestown. 

Related Material: Additional Baldwin papers are found in the Baker 
Library. Harvard Business School. Harvard University: Peabody Essex 
Museum; University of Michigan Libraries; and The Winterthur Li- 
brary. 

Massachusetts Military Division 
History Research and Museum 

Natick, Mass. 

Audiovisual Material: Includes approximately 27 images relating to the 
Navy Yard in the late 19th century and to the 1927-1930 restoration of 
USS Constitution. 



Related Material: 

Park. 



Copy prints are held by Boston National Historical 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 

Middlesex South Registry of Deeds 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Textual Records: Deeds and other legal documents relating to the acqui- 
sition and disposition of Navy Yard real estate prior to the annexation 
of Charlestown to Boston in 1874. 

Architectural and Engineering Plans: Plot plans and other drawings 
relating to Navy Yard real estate. 

Related Material: For post- 1874 records, see Suffolk Registry of Deeds. 

Mystic Seaport 

Mystic. Ct. 

Audiovisual Material: Includes two images relating to the construction 
of Dry Dock 2. 

Related Material: Copy prints are held by Boston National Historical 
Park. 

National Park Service 

Denver Service Center 

Technical Information Center 

Denver, Colo. 

Scope: Includes architectural drawings and historical and technical re- 
ports, contract specifications, completion reports, and other docu- 
ments of the Charlestown Navy Yard and other sites within Boston 
National Historical Park. The materials are arranged numerically by 
the drawing or document number assigned to them in accordance with 
NPS Director's Order 10B, Drawing and Map Numbers. 

Textual Records: Includes originals and copies of historical and techni- 
cal reports, contract specifications, completion reports, and other docu- 
ments relating to the management and treatment of the yard and its 
resources by the Boston Redevelopment Authority and the National 
Park Service. 

Architectural and Engineering Plans: Includes originals and copies of 
architectural and engineering drawings relating to projects undertaken 
by the National Park Service, Boston Redevelopment Authority. U.S. 
Navy, and others, primarily in the period since 1974. 

Related Material: Many of the items in the collection are available in 
digital form through the TIC database [http://etic.nps.gov]. Most of 
the items in the collection are available either as originals or on micro- 
fiche in the Boston National Historical Park Technical Information 
Collection. 

Finding Aids: Most of the documentary material in the collection is 
indexed in the National Park Service's Northeast Region Cultural Re- 
sources Bibliography (CRBIB) database [http://nercrbib.nps.gov/cwis/ 
SPT-Home.php]. Both documentary material and architectural and 
engineering drawings are indexed in the Denver Service Center's Tech- 
nical Information Center (TIC) database [http://etic.nps.gov]. 

National Park Service 
Northeast Regional Office 

Philadelphia. PA 

Historic Surplus Property Program Files 

Scope: In addition to material related specifically to the Historic Monu- 
ment Area, these files include items relating to other parcels in the 
Navy Yard, including the Charlestown Navy Yard unit of Boston Na- 
tional Historical Park 

Textual Records: Includes correspondence, reports, and other material 



1190 



Appendix C, Navy Yard Collections 



relating to the transfer of property to the Boston Redevelopment 
Authority under the Historic Surplus Property Program (Historic 
Monument Program) and its subsequent management of the Historic 
Monument Area. 

Architectural and Engineering Plans: Plans and drawings, including 
preservation guideline drawings, relating to the development of the 
Historic Monument Area. 

Audiovisual Material: Includes photographs of Navy Yard redevelop- 
ment. 

Related Material: Copies of correspondence and reports are held by the 
Division of Cultural Resources, Boston National Historical Park. 

Naval Historical Center 3 

Washington Navy Yard 
Washington, D.C. 

Related Material: A large portion of the Boston National Historical 
Park Archives and the Boston National Historical Park Museum Col- 
lection consists of documents, photographs, and artifacts on loan from 
the Naval Historical Center. 

Operational Archives Branch 
Records of the Reserve Fleet, 1947-1960 

Textual Records: Records relating to the Boston Group of the Atlantic 
Reserve Fleet. 

Photographic Section 

Audiovisual Material: Photographs of naval personnel, ships, and shore 
establishments. While most of the items were generated by the Navy, 
the collection includes material donated from private sources. 

Related Material: The collection includes copies of Navy and other 
photographs held by the National Archives. Many items are dupli- 
cates of photographs in the Boston Naval Shipyard Photo Collection 
in the Boston National Historical Park Archives. Copy prints of 
many items relating to the Charlestown Navy Yard not in the Boston 
Naval Shipyard Photo Collection are held by Boston National Histori- 
cal Park. 

Finding Aids: No specific finding aid exists, but a portion of the collec- 
tion has been digitized as the Online Library of Selected Images [http:/ 
/www.history.navy.mil/branches/orgl l-2.htm]. These images are 
searchable through the website's search engine. 

NavSource Naval History 

http://www.navsource.org/index.html 

Scope: This collection is an Internet-based archive of photographs of 
U.S. Navy ships. It consists of materials contributed to the site by 
numerous individuals. It is arranged by ship classifications and hull 
numbers. 

Audiovisual Material: Photographs of ships at the Boston Naval Ship- 
yard. Of particular value are color images taken by Richard Leonhardt 
between ca. 1958 and 1964. showing ships at both Charlestown and 
South Boston. Includes selected images from the Boston Naval Ship- 
yard Photo Collection. 

Related Material: Many of the images are from the collections of the 
Naval Historical Center and/or the National Archives & Records Ad 
ministration and are also available through the Naval Historical Center's 
Online Library of Selected Images [http://www.history.navy.mil/ 
branches/orgl l-2.htm]. Leonhardt images are also available on Dick 



1 In December 2008. as this report was being completed, the Naval 
Historical Center became the Naval History & Heritage Command. 



Leonhardt's photostream at Flickr.com [http://www.nickr.com/pho 
tos/35033278@N00/collections/72 157600 157689785/1 Digital cop- 
ies of relevant Leonhardt images from these websites are held by Bos- 
ton National Historical Park. 

New England Historic Genealogical Society 
R. Stanton Avery Special Collections Department 

Boston, Mass. 

George Henry Preble Papers, 1791-1873 

Textual Records: Notes on the history of the Boston Navy Yard and 
manuscript "History of the Boston Navy Yard." 

Related Material: Additional material relating to Preble's work on the 
history of the Navy Yard is found in the George Henry Preble Papers 
at the Massachusetts Historical Society. The final official copy of the 
history is found in the National Archives (RG 45). 

New York Public Library 

Miriam & Ira D. Wallach Division of Arts, Prints 

& Photographs 

New York, N.Y. 

Robert N. Dennis Collection of Stereo Views 

Audiovisual Material: Stereo views of the Charlestown Navy Yard and 
the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Some Boston images are mis-catalogued as 
being of the Brooklyn yard. 

Related Material: Most of the stereo views of the Charlestown Navy 
Yard are also found in the Boston Public Library Print Department. 
Digital copies are held by Boston National Historical Park. 

Peabody Essex Museum 
Phillips Library 

Salem, Mass. 

Audiovisual Material: Includes a photograph of the yacht USS America 
at the Navy Yard in 1863. 

Baldwin Family Papers, 1763 1889 

Textual Records: Papers of Loammi Baldwin II relating to dry docks in 
New York, N.Y., and surveys of Boston Harbor. 

Related Material: Additional Baldwin papers are found in the Baker 
Library, Harvard Business School, Harvard University; Institute Ar- 
chives and Special Collections. M.I.T Libraries. Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology; University of Michigan Libraries; and The 
Winterthur Library. 

Joseph Vincent Brown Papers, 1774 1874 

Textual Records: Papers relating to Brown's service as Naval Agent in 
Boston and his interests in hemp and its sale to the Navy. 

Robert Knox, Sr., Papers, 1796 1875 

Textual Records: Papers relating to Sailing Master Robert Knox's ser- 
vice at the Navy Yard, including diary of transactions, 1837-1838; 
letters and orders to Robert Knox, 1837-1844; bills, 1827-1844; and 
record of yard employees, 1843. 

Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum 

Portsmouth Naval Shipyard 
Kittery. Me. 

Audiovisual Material: Approximately 20 images of the Boston Navy 
Yard. The majority of the images are from stereo cards and date to the 
1860s and 1870s. 



- 1191 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Related Material: Copy prints are held by Boston National Historical 
Park. 

State Library of Massachusetts 

State House 
Boston, Mass. 

Finding Aids: Margaret A. Micholet, Annotated Bibliography of Navy 
and Navy Yard Sources at the State Library (Nov. 14. 1984),' TIC 457/ 
D6153. 

Special Collections Department 

State House 
Boston, Mass. 

Scope: In addition to its collection of Alexander Parris Papers, the State 
Library of Massachusetts undertook the Alexander Parris Digital Project 
[http://www.parrisproject.org], which contains drawings, specifica- 
tions, correspondence, and accounts from 1803 to 1851 drawn from 
material held in the State Library and the collections of the Boston 
Athenaeum, Boston Public Library, Boston National Historical Park, 
Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Historical Society, 
and Historic New England (formerly Society for the Preservation of 
New England Antiquities) . 

Alexander Parris Papers, 1817 1851 

Textual Records: Materials relating to Parris and his work on buildings 
in Boston and Portsmouth, N.H., including correspondence seeking 
employment by the Navy. (224 items) 

Suffolk Registry of Deeds 

Boston, Mass. 

Textual Records: Deeds, mortgages, liens, notices, agreements, certifi- 
cates, and other legal documents relating to the acquisition and dispo- 
sition of Navy Yard real estate, including leases and sales of former 
Navy Yard parcels by the Boston Redevelopment Authority, Eco- 
nomic Development & Industrial Corp., and Massachusetts Port Au- 
thority. 

Architectural and Engineering Plans: Plot plans and other drawings 
relating to Navy Yard real estate. 

Related Material: Pre- 1874 records are held by the Middlesex South 
Registry of Deeds. Copies of deeds relating to Boston National His- 
torical Park are found in the Deed Files of the Division of Cultural 
Resources, Boston National Historical Park. 

Finding Aids: Documents from Nov. 1955 to date have been digitized 
and are available through the Registry of Deeds website [http:// 
www.suffolkdeeds.com/default.asp] . Grantor and grantee indexes are 
available for the period 1961-1978. Post-1976 documents are search- 
able through the Registry of Deeds website. 

U.S. Army Military History Institute 

Carlisle Barracks 
Carlisle, Pa. 

Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States 
Massachusetts Commandery 

Audiovisual Material: Includes photograph albums with 19th century 
images of the Charlestown Navy Yard. 



Related Material: Copy prints are held by Boston National Historical 
Park. Most images are also found in the Boston Naval Shipyard Photo 
Collection in the Boston National Historical Park Archives and the 
Burroughs Collection at The Bostonian Society. 

U.S. Naval Academy Museum 

Annapolis, Md. 

Audiovisual Material: Includes a painting of the Commandant's House 
(ca. 1818-1823) attributed to Mrs. James Armstrong. 

Boston Naval Library & Institute Papers, 1842-1885 

Textual Records: Records related to the Boston Naval Library & Insti- 
tute. 

Boston (Charlestown) Navy Yard Papers, 1800-1879 

Textual Records: Miscellaneous records relating to the Charlestown 

Navy Yard. 

University of Michigan 
William L. Clements Library 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Baldwin Family Papers, 1662 1864 

Textual Records: Family and business papers of Loammi Baldwin and 
Loammi Baldwin Jr. 

Architectural and Engineering Plans: Plans prepared by Baldwin for 
the original construction of Dry Dock 1 at the Charlestown Navy Yard 
and its companion dock at the Gosport (Norfolk) Navy Yard. 

Related Material: Additional Baldwin papers are found in the Baker 
Library, Harvard Business School, Harvard University; Institute Ar- 
chives and Special Collections, M.I.T. Libraries. Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology; Peabody Essex Museum: and The Winterthur 
Library. Digital copies of the Dry Dock plans are held by Boston 
National Historical Park. 

Charles Morris Papers, 1801-1851 

Textual Records: Includes papers relating to Charles Morris' service as 
commandant of the Navy Yard (1827-1832). 

The Winterthur Library 

Joseph Downs Collection of 

Manuscripts and Printed Ephemera 

Winterthur, Del. 

Baldwin Family Papers, 1784-1904 

Textual Records: Business accounts related to the construction of the 
Charlestown Naval Dry Dock. 1827-1834. documenting materials pur- 
chased, prices, and suppliers. 

Related Material: Additional Baldwin papers are found in the Baker 
Library, Harvard Business School, Harvard University: Institute Ar- 
chives and Special Collections. M.I.T. Libraries, Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology: Peabody Essex Museum: and University of Michi- 
gan Libraries. 



1192 



Appendix D 

Glossary 



THE FOLLOWING GLOSSARY includes abbreviations, acro- 
nyms, and technical terms relating to the Navy and the Navy 
Yard and historic preservation, as well as other abbrevia- 
tions appearing in this report. For naval ranks and other terms, the 
formal Navy abbreviation (or a ship type symbol) appears in paren- 
theses after the rank or term. Terms in magenta relate specifically to 
the Boston Naval Shipyard, while those in green relate primarily to 
historic preservation. Bold type is used within entries for alterna- 
tive terms or as cross-references to related terms. With a few excep- 
tions, this glossary does not include terms relating to the compo- 
nents of a ship. 1 

The definitions in this glossary have been derived from both 
archival material and specialized dictionaries, glossaries, etc., avail- 
able either in printed form or on-line. 2 

150 Causeway Street — The street address of the North Station 
Industrial Building, which served as headquarters for 
the First Naval District in the early 1940s and for Boston 
National Historical Park and the NPS North Atlantic Re- 
gional Office in the late 1970s. 

1ND — First Naval District; the numeral "1" is often mistaken for or 
shown as a capital "I." 

666 Summer Street — The designation used by the Navy for the 
former Boston Army Base following its transfer in July 
1970, reflecting the facility's street address. 

ACHP — Advisory Council on Historic Preservation; an indepen- 
dent federal agency established under the National His- 
toric Preservation Act (NHPA) of 1 966 to review and com- 
ment on federal actions affecting properties listed in or 
eligible for the National Register and advise the Presi- 
dent and the Congress on historic preservation matters. 

adaptive reuse (also adaptive use) — The rehabilitation of a historic 
property for a use other than that for which it was histori- 
cally used. 

administrative officer ( AO) — The individual in a naval shore es- 
tablishment or a national park responsible for manage- 



1 For an explanation of ship terminology, see U.S. Army, Marine 
Crewman's Handbook, Field Manual No. 55-501, Dec. 1, 1999 (Washington. 
1999), chap. 3. 

2 See, e.g., Deborah W. Cutler and Thomas J. Cutler, Dictionary of 
Naval Abbreviations, 4th ed. (Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2005); 
Deborah W. Cutler and Thomas J. Cutler. Dictionary of Naval Terms, 6th ed. 
(Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2005); Denver Service Center, Definitions 
[web page] [http://workflow.den.nps.gov/staging/9_glossary.htm. accessed 
Sept. 5, 2005]; Frank Gaynor, ed., The New Military and Naval Dictionary 
(New York: Philosophical Library, 1951); U.S. Office of Naval Records & 
History, Glossary of U.S. Naval Abbreviations, 5th ed. (OPNAV 29-P1000, 
Apr. 1949). available on-line [http://www.history.navy.mil/books/OPNAV20- 
PlOOO/index.html, accessed Sept. 4. 2005]; Robert J. Winklareth. Naval 
Shipbuilders of the World From the Age of Sail to the Present Day (London: 
Chatham Publishing, 2000). p. 360-68. 



ment of activities such as contracting, finance, and per- 
sonnel. 

admiral (ADM) — The highest naval rank (see Table D-l ), first 
authorized as rear admiral (originally rear-admiral) in 
1 862, equivalent to major general in the Air Force, Army, or 
Marine Corps. The rank of vice admiral (originally vice- 
admiral), equivalent to lieutenant general, was created in 
1 864, and that of admiral, equivalent to general, was es- 
tablished in 1 866. With the abolition of the grade of com- 
modore in 1 899, the grade of rear admiral was divided into 
two halves. The grade of fleet admiral was established in 
1945, equivalent to general of the army. The five grades 
of admiral are denoted on uniform insignia and on flags by 
one to five stars in ascending order. Admirals are also 
known as flag officers. 

adverse effect — A determination under Section 106 that an action 
alters the characteristics that qualify a property for inclu- 
sion in the National Register in a manner that would di- 
minish the integrity of the property. 

aircraft carrier (CV/CVN) (also carrier) — A warship having a 
large flight deck and an island superstructure capable of 
operating aircraft at sea. In the 1950s, the Navy used 
separate classifications for carriers intended for attack 
(CVA/CVAN) or anti-submarine warfare support (CVS). 

amphibious craft — see landing craft 

amphibious ship — A warship capable of landing or supporting the 
operations of Marines or Army personnel on hostile 
shores. Numerous types of amphbious ships were devel- 
oped during World War II, the most important of which 




Anchor — Upon completion of the anchor for the aircraft carrier USS 
Forrestal (CVA-59) (center), the yard arranged this Mar. 17. 1955, photo- 
graph to compare it with one from USS Constitution (IX-21 ) (right). 

BOSTS-9690 



- II 93 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 





Table D-1 


RANKS 




TABLE OF NAVAL 


The following table lists U.S. Navy ranks ir 


ascending order, together with 


the equivalent ranks in the Marine Corps. The official Navy abbreviation of 


the ra 


nk appears in parentheses. It should be noted that naval enlisted 


personnel are generally referred to by their rating (occupational specialty) 


(e.g., 


J03, Journalist 3rd Class) instead of their basic rank. 




Grade U.S. Navy 


U.S. Marine Corps 


Enlisted Personnel 




E1 


Seaman Recruit (SR) 


Private 


E2 


Seaman Apprentice (SA) 


Private First Class 


E3 


Seaman (SN) 


Lance Corporal 


E4 


Petty Officer, 3rd Class (P03) 


Corporal 


E5 


Petty Officer, 2nd Class (P02) 


Sergeant 


E6 


Petty Officer, 1st Class (P01) 


Staff Sergeant 


E7 


Chief Petty Officer (CPO) 


Gunnery Sergeant 


E8 


Senior Chief Petty Officer (SCPO) 


Master Sergeant or 
First Sergeant 


E9 


Master Chief Petty Officer (MCPO) 


Sergeant Major or 
Master Gunnery Sergeant 


Warrant Officers 




W1 


Warrant Officer 1 (W01) 


Warrant Officer 1 


W2 


Chief Warrant Officer 2 (CW02) 


Chief Warrant Officer 2 


W3 


Chief Warrant Officer 3 (CW03) 


Chief Warrant Officer 3 


W4 


Chief Warrant Officer 4 (CW04) 


Chief Warrant Officer 4 


W5 


Chief Warrant Officer 5 (CW05) 


Chief Warrant Officer 5 


Commissioned Officers 




01 


Ensign (ENS) 


Second Lieutenant 


02 


Lieutenant Junion Grade (LTJG) 


First Lieutenant 


03 


Lieutenant (LT) 


Captain 


04 


Lieutenant Commander (LCDR) 


Major 


05 


Commander (CDR) 


Lieutenant Colonel 


06 


Captain (CAPT) 


Colonel 


07 


Rear Admiral Lower Half (RADM) 


Brigadier General 


08 


Rear Admiral Upper Half (RADM) 


Major General 


09 


Vice Admiral (VADM) 


Lieutenant General 


010 


Admiral (ADM) 


General 


— 


Fleet Admiral (FADM) 


— 





were amphibious transports (APA/APD), amphibious 
cargo ships (AKA), dock landing ships (LSD), medium 
landing ships (LSM), and tank landing ships (LST). 

anchor — ( 1 ) n. An iron or steel device used to hold a ship at rest in 
water, raised or lowered by a cable using a capstan. (2) v. 
To deploy an anchor or to otherwise come to a stop other 
than in a dock or at a wharf or pier. 

anchorage — An area of open water used for the mooring of ships. 

annex — A geographically-separate facility administratively and/or 
operationally attached to another shore establishment. 

ASW — Anti-submarine warfare 

auxiliary — A naval vessel intended to provide logistical support 
to warships (including at-sea replenishment of ammuni- 
tion, stores, and fuel), transport materiel or personnel, or 
perform special missions such as surveying, etc. Many 
naval auxiliaries were converted from merchant vessels, 
and operate with civilian crews. 

availability — The period of time when a naval ship is in a shipyard 
or other facility for overhaul, repairs, etc. 

BAB — Boston Army Base; also known as Boston Army Supply 
Base or Boston Quartermaster Depot. 

barge — A craft, generally with a rectangular hull, used to haul 
materials or carry heavy equipment such as cranes. Most 
barges are non-self-propelled, being moved by tugs, but 



some are self-propelled either by engines or sails. Some- 
times known as a lighter. Navy barges are generally iden- 
tified by their employment, e.g., coal barge (later open 
lighter) ( YC); gasoline barge (YOG/YOGN): oil storage 
barge (YOS); sludge removal barge ( YSR); torpedo test- 
ing barge (YTT); water barge (YW/YWN). 

bark (also barque) — A sailing vessel with three or more masts, all 
of which are ship-rigged except the after mast, which is 
fore-and-aft rigged. 

Barnes Building — see Navy Building 

barracks — ( 1 ) I.e. A dormitory-style facility for housing military 
personnel. Barracks include, either in the same structure 
or in nearby structures, support facilities such as latrines 
and mess halls. Until the 20th century, most Navy per- 
sonnel were housed on receiving ships rather than in 
shore-based barracks, and the Navy since World War II 
has maintained non-self-propelled barracks craft ( APL ) 
and repair and berthing barges ( YRBARBM ) for use as 
temporary quarters for sailors in shipyards. (2) u.c. A 
Marine Corps detachment assigned to a naval base. 

barracks ship ( APB) — A self-propelled naval auxiliary which pro- 
vided berthing space for sailors at advance bases. Most 
barracks ships were completed too late for service in World 
War II, but served as "mother ships" for riverine warfare 
craft during the Vietnam Conflict. 

base — A generic term used to refer to any military installation 
irregardless of its official designation. 

basin — An artificially enclosed area of a river or harbor designed 
so that the water level remains unaffected by tidal changes. 
Access to basins is usually controlled through gates. 
Sometimes referred to as a wet basin or by the type of 
material stored in it (e.g., timber basin). Also known as a 
dock or wet dock. 

battery — A set of guns or other heavy artillery, either on a ship or 
on land. Most naval shore establishments housed only a 
saluting battery used to fire gun salutes in honor of visit- 
ing dignitaries or ships or on patriotic occasions rather 
than to defend the facilitv from attack. 




Barracks — This view of Frazier Barracks (Building 33) from Feb. 14, 
1972, shows the typical bunk beds (termed racks by sailors) and lockers 
found in military barracks of the period. BOSTS-9336 



1 1 94 - 



Appendix D, Glossary 




But, Bollard, Brow — This photograph of Pier 6 East from July 1 923 
shows, from left to right, a bitt, the brow providing access to the ship, and 
a bollard. BOSTS-15623 

battle group — see fleet 

battleship ( BB) — A large, heavily-armored steel warship intended 
to project naval power and engage in actions with enemy 
fleets. Sometimes referred to as a capital ship. 

BCG — see Boston Caretaker Group 

BEQ — see quarters 

berth — ( l ) An anchorage, mooring, or docking space assigned to a 
vessel. (2) A sleeping place assigned onboard a ship. 

berthing barge (YRB/YRBM) — see barracks 

bitt (also bitts) — A pair of low steel posts on a pier or ship for 
securing mooring lines. 

BLC - — Boston Landmarks Commission; an agency of the City of 
Boston which performs the functions of a local historical 
commission under Massachusetts state law and has the 
power to designate formal city landmarks. 

BMIP (also MIP) — Boston Marine Industrial Park; current name of 
South Boston Annex. See also MMT 

BNHP — Boston National Historical Park; unofficial acronym used 
in place of the official acronym BOST. 

BNS — Boston Naval Shipyard 

BNS/C - — Boston Naval Shipyard/Charlestown; the original desig- 
nation used by the BRA for portions of the Navy Yard 
transferred to it; replaced by the name Charlestown Navy 
Yard around 1990. 

Board of Navy Commissioners — Also known as the Navy Board, 
the Board of Navy Commissioners was established in 1815 
and consisted of three senior captains who managed the 
administrative and logistical affairs of the Navy. The board 
was abolished in 1842 and its responsibilities distributed 
to several Bureaus. 

boat — ( 1 ) A water craft, sometimes termed a small boat, usually 
capable of being hoisted on board a ship, including vari- 
ous types of whaleboats, captain's gigs, and landing craft. 
Navy boats are generally assigned a registry number, with 
the prefix "C-" used to denote craft purchased from con- 
tractors rather than built by the Navy. (2) In naval usage, 
a submarine. 

boilerhouse (originally boiler house) — A building housing boilers 
to produce steam to power steam engines or to provide 
heat. Boilerhouses were usually adjacent to but separate 
from the buildings or engine houses that they served. See 
also powerhouse 

bollard — ( 1 ) A large solid post on a wharf or pier for securing 
mooring lines. Many naval shipyard bollards utilized sur- 
plus cannons, buried muzzle down. (2) A protective post 
placed around fire hydrants, electrical service boxes, and 
other equipment to prevent vehicles from hitting them. 



The Navy Yard traditionally used surplus railroad track 
rail for such purposes. 

boom — A horizontal spar hinged at one end to a mast, used to 
support a fore-and-aft-rigged sail or as a derrick. 

BOQ — see quarters 

BOS (also BSN) — Navy abbreviation for Boston. 

BosGrp — Boston Group, Atlantic Reserve Fleet 

BOST — NPS acronym for Boston National Historical Park. 

Boston Caretaker Group (BCG) — The organizational unit estab- 
lished as a subsidiary of the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard 
to take over the management of the Boston Naval Ship- 
yard following its official disestablishment in July 1974; 
responsible for on-going maintenance pending final trans- 
fer of the property to the General Services Administration 
(GSA) for ultimate disposal. The BCG identified as Code 
900, was abolished in mid- 1 976. 

BRA -- Boston Redevelopment Authority; quasi-independent 
agency of the City of Boston, established under state law 
in 1957, responsible for urban redevelopment programs 
within the city. In 1995 the BRA assumed administrative 
control of the Economic Development and Industrial Cor- 
poration of Boston ( EDIC). 

bridge crane — A crane consisting of a hoist mechanism traveling 
along an elevated beam which itself travels on an elevated 
framework. The framework can be freestanding or built 
into the structure of a building. Many bridge cranes have 
operator's cabs suspended from the beam on which the 
hoist is mounted, while others are controlled remotely. 

brig — ( 1 ) A two-masted, ship-rigged sailing vessel. (2) A naval 
prison. 

brow — A narrow portable platform used to cross from one ship to 
another, or from a ship to a pier. Most brows have rollers 
at the pier end to enable them to move in response to the 
rise and fall of the tide. Originally of wood, most brows 
are now made of aluminum. Also known as a gangplank. 

Bureau — An administrative division within the Navy Department, 
headed by a senior naval officer, responsible for a particu- 
lar aspect of naval activity. Established in 1 842 and reor- 
ganized in 1 862, the bureaus, under an 1 868 order of the 
Secretary of the Navy, had their equivalent organization 
within navy yards. Except for the Bureau of Medicine & 
Surgery and the Bureau of Naval Personnel, the bureaus 
were abolished in a 1 966 Navy reorganization that saw the 
creation of systems commands to replace them. The indi- 
vidual bureaus and their abbreviations included: 




Bridge Crane — Bridge cranes served most of the industrial buildings in 
the Navy Yard, allowing heavy materials to be moved throughout the length 
and width of their central bays. This pair of 5-ton capacity cranes is in the 
Structural Shop in the Building 104 Extension. Note how they are on 
different levels so they can pass each other. BOSTS-15920 



II 95 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Auxiliary Ships: A Gallery 



NAVAL AUXILIARY SHIPS serve the combatant fleet by pro- 
viding logistical support in the form of repair ships and under- 
way replenishment of ammunition, fuel, and stores. They also per- 
form special missions ranging from early warning of potential attack 



to scientific research. This gallery presents a sampling of the wide 
variety of naval auxiliaries serviced by the Navy Yard. Most images 
were taken in accordance with a Bureau of Ships requirement that 
the shipyard photograph all new and converted ships "in stream." 




Cable Repairing Ship (ARC) — Cable repairing ships are easily recog- 
nized by the large sheaves on the bow used for laying and retrieving 
submarine communications cables. Although homeported at the Ports- 
mouth Naval Shipyard, USS Aeolus (ARC-3), seen in May 1961 , was a 
frequent customer of the Boston Naval Shipyard in the 1960s and early 
1970s. BOSTS-16201 



Cargo Ship (AK) — Cargo ships carried a wide variety of non-perishable 
material. Most were converted from civilian freighters. Seen on May 26, 
1 942, USS Aries (AK-51 ), formerly SS John J. O'Hagan, had first been in 
naval service between Sept. 1918 and July 1 91 9 as USS Lake Geneva (Id. 
N0.4215-B). BOSTS-10289 




Coastal Transport (APc) — Coastal transports were wood-hulled ships 
used for transporting men and materiel in coastal waters or between 
islands in the Pacific. APc-55 is seen on May 28, 1 943, eight days after her 
transfertothe Royal Navy as HMS FT.5. BOSTS-10117 



Destroyer Tender (AD) — Tenders provided logistical and repair sup- 
port for specific types of ships at advance bases. The destroyer tender 
USS Cascade (AD-1 6) is seen in Mar. 1 962 near the end of a three-month 
overhaul period. BOSTS-10637 




Icebreaker (AGB) — Icebreakers have reinforced hulls enabling them to 
break through ice fields. USS Atka (AGB-3) is seen in Mar. 1 965 following 
the addition of a helicopter hanger at her stern. Built as USCG Southwind 
(WAG-280) and acquired by the Navy in 1 950 after Lend-Lease service 
with the Soviet Navy, Atka and all other Navy icebreakers were trans- 
ferred to the Coast Guard in 1 966. BOSTS-10307 



- 

- 


r 
■ 
i 

M HHMkr 


. 



Net Laying Ship (AN) — USS Hoptree (AN-62, ex-YN-83) is seen on Dec. 
2, 1 944. Originally designated as Net Tender (YN), net laying ships (usually 
called net layers) serviced anti-submarine nets placed across harbors. 
Named for species of trees, the ships were based at Net Depots such as 
that located at the South Boston Annex. BOSTS-11434 



II 96 



Appendix D, Glossary 



Auxiliary Ships: A Gallery 




, : 






ii ig ■i.J'i'l ifTI 




Oceanographic Research Ship (AGOR) — Although its surveying ships 
also performed oceanographic research, the Navy introduced a new class 
of dedicated oceanographic research ships in the 1960s. USNS Charles 
H. Davis (T-AGOR-5) is seen on Jan. 30, 1 963, five days after being placed 
in service. Unlike several sisters loaned to research institutions, Davis 
remained under naval operation until transferred to New Zealand as HMNZS 
Tui (A-2) in 1970. BOSTS-10659 



Oiler (AO) — The oiler, originally called a fuel ship, is an essential element 
of deployed naval forces, possessing the ability to perform underway 
replenishment (UNREP) of the fuel supplies of other vessels. USS Mispillion 
(AO-1 05) is seen in July 1 966 at the completion of a project to "jumboize" 
the ship to increase her capacity by 93,000 barrels. Although the insertion 
of the nearly 100-foot-long additional hull section was performed by a 
private shipyard, the Navy Yard completed the conversion. 

BOSTS-13609 




Radar Picket Ship (YAGR; later AGR) — In the mid-1 950s the Navy began 
to convert a series of "Liberty" ships into radar picket ships to supplement 
the land-based Distant Early Warning (DEW) network monitoring a potential 
Soviet air attack on North America. Naval Air Station Quonset Point took this 
aerial view of USS Searcher (YAGR-4) on May 29, 1 956. BOSTS-14209 



Small Seaplane Tender (AVP) — Seaplane tenders featured a large 
crane to bring seaplanes aboard for servicing. An OS2U "Kingfisher" 
seaplane sits on the fantail of USS Barnegat (AVP-1 0) on New Year's Day 
1 942. Many of the large group of small seaplane tenders built by the Navy 
during World War II became Coast Guard cutters after the war. 

BOSTS-10343 




Transport (AP) — USS GeneralH. W. 8ufner(AP-113), named for Army 
Maj.Gen. HenryW. Butner (1875-1937), is seen on June 6, 1947, following 
the completion of work to convert the ship from austere wartime conditions 
to peacetime standards. Until aircraft replaced them in the mid-1960s, 
transports operated regular trans-Atlantic and trans-Pacific routes to move 
military personnel and their dependents to and from overseas assign- 
ments. BOSTS-11227 




Vehicle Cargo Ship (AKR) — Vehicle cargo ships have boxy hulls to 
maximize internal vehicle storage and ramps to allow vehicles to be driven 
on and off. Named for Army Sgt. Cornelius H. Charlton, who received a 
posthumous Medal of Honor in the Korean War, USNS Charlton (T-AKR- 
314) is seen in Dry Dock 3 in Oct. 2003. Note the side loading ramp. 

Boston Ship Repair 



ll 97 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



BuAer Bureau of Aeronautics 

BuC&R Bureau of Construction & Repair 
BuDocks Bureau of Yards & Docks 
BuEng Bureau of Engineering 

Bureau of Equipment 
BuMed Bureau of Medicine & Surgery 
BuNav Bureau of Navigation (renamed Bureau of 

Naval Personnel in 1942) 
BuOrd Bureau of Ordnance 

BuPers Bureau of Naval Personnel 

BuSandA Bureau of Supplies & Accounts 
BuShips Bureau of Ships 
BuWeps Bureau of Naval Weapons 

Bureau of Construction & Repair ( BuC&R) — Established in 1 842 
as the Bureau of Construction, Equipment & Repairs 
and renamed in 1 862 when the Bureau of Equipment was 
established, the bureau was responsible for constructing 
and repairing ships. Combined with the Bureau of Engi- 
neering in 1940 to create the Bureau of Ships. See also 
C&R 

Bureau of Engineering ( BuEng) — Established in 1 862 as the Bu- 
reau of Steam Engineering and renamed in 1920, the bu- 
reau was responsible for the design, manufacture, and 
maintenance of a ship's machinery. Combined with the 
Bureau of Construction & Repair in 1940 to form the 
Bureau of Ships. 

Bureau of Equipment — Established in 1 862 as the Bureau of Equip- 
ment & Recruiting and renamed in 1 89 1 , the bureau was 
responsible for the manufacture, maintenance, and issu- 
ance of equipment such as rope, chain, anchors, etc. Abol- 
ished in 1914, four years after its duties had been reas- 
signed to other bureaus. 

Bureau of Ordnance (BuOrd) — Established in 1 842 as the Bureau 
of Ordnance & Hydrography and renamed in 1 862, the 
bureau was responsible for the design, manufacture, main- 
tenance, and issuance of all armaments and for the opera- 
tion of ammunition depots, magazines, and similar facili- 
ties. Combined with the Bureau of Aeronautics in 1959 to 
form the Bureau of Naval Weapons (BuWeps), which was 
in turn replaced by the Naval Air Systems Command 
(NAVA1R) and the Naval Ordnance Systems Command 
(NAVORD)inl966. 

Bureau of Ships ( BuShips) — Established in 1 940 through the con- 
solidation of the Bureau of Construction & Repair and 
the Bureau of Engineering, the bureau was responsible 
for the design, construction, and repair of naval ships. It 
was replaced in 1966 by the Naval Ship Systems Com- 
mand (NAVSH1P), which in 1 974 merged with the Naval 
Ordnance Systems Command (NAVORD) to form the 
Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA). 

Bureau of Supplies & Accounts (BuSandA) Established in 1842 
as the Bureau of Provisions & Clothing and renamed in 
1 892, the bureau was responsible for the acquisition, stor- 
age, and distribution of supplies other than ordnance. It 
was replaced in 1 966 by the Naval Supply Systems Com- 
mand (NAVSUP). 

Bureau of Yards & Docks (BuDocks) — Established in 1842 as the 



Bureau of Naval Yards & Docks and renamed in 1 862. the 
bureau was responsible for building and maintaining shore 
establishments. In 1911. all public works activities were 
consolidated under the bureau, ending the practice of in- 
dividual bureaus designing and constructing their own 
facilities within navy yards. The bureau was replaced in 
1966 by the Naval Facilities Engineering Command 
(NAVFAC). SeealsoY&D 

C & R — Construction & Repair; either the Bureau of Construction 
& Repair in Washington or its equivalent organization in 
navy yards. Within shipyards. Construction & Repair 
became part of the Production Division in the 20th cen- 
tury. 

cable — A heavy fiber or wire rope or chain, generally used for 
mooring or anchoring a ship. 

cable repairing ship (ARC) — A naval auxiliary designed to lay and 
repair submarine communications cables. 

caisson — A ship-like gate used to enclose the end of a dry dock, 
which can be flooded to hold it in position. Most cais- 
sons contain tubes and valves through which water can 
be admitted to flood the dry dock. Early references often 
term caissons as floating gates. 

camel — A small float used to separate a ship's hull from the side of 
a pier or another ship. Camels are often used as stages for 
work on the side of a floating ship such as painting. 

capstan — An apparatus consisting of a vertical cylinder rotated 
manually by a series of poles inserted into the top of the 
cylinder or by a motor, used for hoisting anchors or other 
weights by winding in a cable or operating the gates of a 
dry dock or wet dock. 

captain (CAPT) — ( 1 ) A naval rank, equivalent of colonel in the Air 
Force, Army, or Marine Corps. Until 1862, captain was the 
senior rank in the Navy, although the designations com- 
modore or flag officer were used for captains command- 
ing squadrons. (2) The title applied to the commanding 
officer or civilian master of a ship, irregardless of actual 
naval rank. 

Captain of the Yard — The second-ranking officer in a navy yard, 
equivalent to the executive officer (XO) on a ship. The 
position, which headed the Military Department of a na\ \ 
yard following the 1921 reorganization of navy yard ad- 
ministration, was abolished in Nov. 1945. 




Capstan — The Navy Yard utilized electric capstans to assist maneuvering 
ships in its dry docks. Here workers play out nylon rope being wound 
around the capstan at the head of Dry Dock 2 in the early or mid-1 960s. 

BOSTS-16175 



ll 98 



Appendix D, Glossary 



careening — see heaving down 

cargo ship (AK) — A naval auxiliary carrying cargo (freight), equiva- 
lent of a merchant freighter. An attack cargo ship ( AKA) 

was a cargo ship equipped with landing craft and intended 
to discharge cargo onto enemy beaches. A vehicle cargo 
ship ( AKV) is a specialized cargo ship containing ramps 
to allow vehicles to be driven directly onto and off the 
ship. Note: The U.S. Army used the designation freight- 
supply (FS) for ships which became the Navy's small cargo 
ship ( AKL) and the term transport to denote larger cargo 
ships as well as passenger ships. 

carrier — see aircraft carrier; escort carrier 

caulker — A person who specializes in the sealing of joints in 
wooden ships with oakum, pitch, tar, etc., to provide a 
waterproof hull or deck surface. 

change of command — Aceremony at which the incoming (prospec- 
tive) commanding officer of a base or ship formally re- 
lieves his/her predecessor and takes command. 

Chapter 91 — Chapter 91 of the Massachusetts General Laws, the 
Public Waterfront Act, which sets forth the permitting pro- 
cess for both water-dependent and non-water-dependent 
development in coastal areas. 

character-defining feature (CDF) — A prominent or distinctive as- 
pect, quality, or characteristic of a historic property that 
contributes significantly to its physical character and 
which must be retained in order to preserve that character. 
Structures; objects; vegetation; spatial relationships; 
views; furnishings; the form and detailing of exterior ma- 
terials and/or exterior features such as roofs, porches, and 
windows; and materials may be such features. 

Chief— seeCPO 

christening — A ceremony at which a ship's sponsor formally names 
the vessel, generally by breaking a bottle of fluid (some- 
times water, sometimes champagne) over the bow. For 
ships built on inclined ways, christening takes place as a 
prelude to the launching. For ships built in dry docks or 
basins, the christening often takes place either as a stand- 
alone event or just prior to the commissioning ceremony. 




Change of Command — The purpose 
of the change of command ceremony 
was the public acknowledgment that 
a new officer was in charge of a par- 
ticular ship or shore establishment. 
Here, outgoing Shipyard Commander 
Rear Adm. Robert C. Gooding (left) 
shakes hands with incoming Shipyard 
Commander Capt. Raymond W. Burk 
just before the formal ceremony held 
at the Shipyard Band Stand on Oct. 9, 
1969. BOSTS- 15 965 



The term naming ceremony has generally replaced the 
term in contemporary usage. 

CINC (originally CinC) — Naval abbreviation for Commander-in- 
Chief, usually used with additional abbreviations to de- 
note naval commands, particularly those afloat (e.g., 
CINCPAC, Command-in-Chief, Pacific). 

Civil Engineer (CE) — Established as a permanent position within 
navy yards in 1 852, the Civil Engineer was a civilian who 
oversaw the construction and repair of navy yard facili- 
ties. In 1866, Congress converted the position to a uni- 
formed one. Most Civil Engineers, later known as Public 
Works Officers, were limited duty officers in the Civil 
Engineering Corps (CEC) rather than line officers. 

cleat — A low metal fitting on a pier or ship (or on a flagpole or 
flagstaff) that has two projecting horns to which a line can 
be secured. 

CNO — Chief of Naval Operations; the senior uniformed officer of 
the Navy, with rank of admiral. Created in 1 9 1 5 in an effort 
to provide better coordination of both operational activi- 
ties and the administrative bureaus. 

CNY — Charlestown Navy Yard 

CO — Commanding officer; the officer in charge of a ship or shore 
establishment. 

coal house — A facility, usually adjacent to a boilerhouse or engine 
house, for the storage of coal for use in boilers. 



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Code 000 — This chart taken from a command 
presentation shows the administrative organi- 
zation of the shipyard as of Fiscal Year 1972. 
The code number for each unit appears in the 
lower right corner of each block. Each code 
was divided into individual offices and positions 
(e.g., Code 424; Code 424.01), these designa- 
tions were often used in internal communica- 
tions rather than organizational titles. 

BOSTS-13344 



1 1 99 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 
Ship Commissioning — USS Kalamazoo (AOR-6): A Gallery 



THE COMMISSIONING CEREMONY is one of the most impor- 
tant ones in the life of a naval vessel, for it is the point at which 
it becomes an active unit of the Navy. In peacetime, the occasion is 
also the opportunity for the Navy to show off its newest ship to 
both the crew's families and the public at large. While more sub- 
dued in wartime, the basic elements of the ceremony remained. These 
include the formal acceptance of the ship from her builder, the read- 
ing of the prospective commanding officer's orders to take com- 
mand, the raising of the colors and commissioning pennant, the 
manning of the vessel, and the setting of the first watch. 

The Charlestown Navy Yard was the location for the commis- 
sioning not only of the ships built there, but also those constructed 
by private shipyards from as far away as the Great Lakes. Most, 
however, came from yards along the New England coast, principally 
those at Bath, Maine, and Quincy, Massachusetts. In a few in- 
stances, ships built elsewhere were brought to Boston for commis- 
sioning because of ties in the area to a vessel's namesake. 



In peacetime, most commissioning ceremonies took place at 
Pier 1 East. Piers 7 and 1 1, as well as the jetties at the South Boston 
Annex, were used for ships too large for Pier 1 . During World War II, 
many commissionings were held at the piers where final fitting out 
of the ships had occurred. 

This gallery includes a selection of images and documents re- 
lating to the commissioning of USS Kalamazoo (AOR-6) on August 
1 1 , 1 973 , the final vessel commissioned at the Navy Yard prior to its 
closure. (Two ships, both having close associations with Boston, 
have been commissioned at the yard since 1974.) The replenish- 
ment oiler had been built by General Dynamics at the Fore River 
Shipyard in Quincy and was named for the city of Kalamazoo, Michi- 
gan. Thus, the principal speaker at the event was the city's mayor, 
Gilbert H.Bradley. 

Following the formal ceremony, the ship's officers hosted a 
reception in the Preble Room of the Navy Yard Officers Club in 
Building 5. 







UNITED STATES SHIP 

KALAMAZ(X> 

FI£ET REPLEMSHMENT IIII.EK SIX 

UMMISSHMNC 

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Program books for commissioning ceremonies included the listing of events 
along with information about the ship, biographies of the principal speakers 
and ship's officers, and listings of the crew members. BOSTS-15404 



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The program for the commissioning was scripted in advance. This page of 
the script reflects the point at which the ship is formally placed in commis- 
sion and is manned by her crew. BOSTS-1 5405 




Because of the ship's 659-foot length, the commissioning was held at Pier 
7 West. Here her prospective commanding officer, Capt. John H. Bres 
(right), escorts RearAdm. Julian T Burke, Jr., Commander Service Force, 
U.S. Atlantic Fleet (left), to the ceremony. In the background between them 
is RearAdm. Richard E. Rumble, Commandant of the First Naval District, 
who would officially place the ship into commission. BOSTS-11604 



1200 



Appendix D, Glossary 



Ship Commissioning — USS Kalamazoo (AOR-6): A Gallery 




The guests for the commissioning sat under the yard's commissioning tent, 
which was angled upward so that they could see the ship. Note how the 
center of the tent is supported by one of the yard's cranes. 

BOSTS-11604 



The principal speaker at the event 
was Kalamazoo, Mich., Mayor Gil- 
bert H. Bradley, the first African- 
American to hold that post. 

BOSTS-11604 




One of the key events 
in the commissioning 
program is the raising of 
the flag at the ship's 
stern (left). Following 
the national anthem, the 
ship's crew boards the 
vessel to man the rails 
(right). BOSTS-11604 





Following the commissioning ceremony, the ship's 

officers, their families, and their guests went to the 

Preble Room for a reception (above left). Exchanges 

of gifts were a feature of the program. (Above) 

Capt. Bres presents a ship's plaque and a framed 

photograph to Mrs. Charles L. (Florence) III, who 

had been the ship's sponsor at her christening. 

(Right) Mayor Bradley received a plaque along with the flag flown during the commissioning. On the 

table is part of the silver service presented to the ship by Mrs. III. (Left) Officers and their wives or 

girlfriends pose for their portrait in front of a reproduction of a painting of USS Constitution. 

BOSTS-11604 




1 201 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



cobb wharf (also cob wharf) — A wharf built of stone-filled timber 
eribbing enclosing areas which were filled with earth. 

Code 000 — Numerical designations assigned to offices within a 
naval shipyard organization, often used as a synonym for 
the holder of the position. Codes may be divided deci- 
mally to denote individual positions (e.g., Code 400.1) 
within a particular office. 

cofferdam — A temporary structure built around an area to allow 
water to be pumped out so that construction work can 
take place, especially for the building and repair of docks, 
piers, etc. See also sheet piling 

collier (AC) — A naval auxiliary designed to transport coal. Some 
colliers performed underway replenishment as well. 

colors — ( 1 ) I.e. A flag or flags carried by a military unit, particularly 
the ensign. (2)u.c. A formal ceremony, held at naval shore 
establishments and on ships in port at 8 a.m. and at sun- 
set, at which the ensign is raised or lowered and the na- 
tional anthem is generally played. Ships in port display 
both the ensign at the stern and the jack at the bow. 

COM — Naval abbreviation for commander, usually used with ad- 
ditional abbreviations to denote the commander of a par- 
ticular naval command, both afloat and ashore (e.g., 
COMDESLANT, Commander, Destroyers, Atlantic Fleet). 
Note: This abbreviation is not used for the naval rank of 
commander. 

combatants — Naval vessels capable of combat operations, includ- 
ing warships, amphibious ships, mine warfare ships, and 
certain fleet support auxiliaries (such as ammunition 
ships and oilers). 

command — n. A generic term for a base, shore establishment, ship, 
fleet, or other unit having its own commanding officer. 

commander (CDR) — ( 1 ) A naval rank equivalent of lieutenant colo- 
nel in the Air Force, Army, or Marine Corps; established in 
1 838 to replace master commandant. (2) The designation 
of the officer commanding a naval shipyard or other shore 
establishment, irrespective of actual naval rank. 

commanding officer — see CO 

Commandant (Comdt) — ( 1 ) The designation of the officer com- 
manding a naval district or navy yard, irrespective of ac- 
tual naval rank. (2) The designation of the senior uni- 
formed officer of the Marine Corps, originally with the 
rank of colonel but now a general. 

commissioning — A ceremony at which a naval vessel is accepted 
into the fleet and placed in commission. During the cer- 
emony, the ship is formally accepted from her builder, the 
commanding officer reads his orders and assumes com- 
mand, the colors are hoisted, and the ship then begins to 
function as a Navy command in its own right. The Navy's 
use of the word "commission" means the placing of a 
ship in active service. 

commodore (CDRE; also Commo) — (1) The designation of the 
senior captain or commander of a squadron, often used 
thereafter as a courtesy title in lieu of the officer's actual 
rank of captain. (2) A naval rank, equivalent of brigadier 
general in the Air Force, Army, or Marine Corps, estab- 
lished in 1862. Abolished in 1899. it was reinstated in 
1 943. It reverted to rear admiral (lower half) following 




Concession — In 1 91 the Navy Yard awarded a concession contract to 
J.M. Crowley to operate a restaurant on the first floor of Building 28. The 
restaurant expanded to the second floor in 1 932, and continued in opera- 
tion into the early 1940s. This Feb. 1921 view shows the restaurant's 
fountain and service counter. BOSTS-9311 

World War II, only to be briefly used again in the mid- 
1980s. 

COMONE — Naval abbreviation for Commandant, First Naval Dis- 
trict. Often used as a synonym for the district itself. 

compliance — The process through which natural and cultural re- 
sources are taken into account in federal, state, and local 
government actions through regulations issued pursuant 
to NEPA, Section 106. etc.. and corresponding state re- 
quirements. 

concession — A facility within a government installation leased to 
and operated by a private entity which supplies some 
service to employees and/or visitors. In the Navy Yard, 
this has typically involved provision of food service. 

concessionaire — The operator of a concession facility. 

conversion — The modification of a naval vessel to perform differ- 
ent missions or operate different weapons systems. Some 
conversions involved extensive reconstruction of a ship 
and could last several years. See also razee 

cooperage — A facility for the manufacture of barrels using wooden 
staves and iron bands. 

cooperating association — A private group, usually incorporated 
as a non-profit organization, which supports the activities 
of a national park. Cooperating associations may be park 
specific, regional, or national in nature (such as Eastern 
National, formerly Eastern National Park & Monument 
Association). A major activity of cooperating associations 
is the operation of sales outlets in park visitor centers. 

cooperative agreement — A formal agreement between the National 
Park Service and a private individual or organization or 
another governmental entity (local, state, or federal) which 
defines the roles of the respective parties in the manage- 
ment of national park sites. The authority to enter into 
cooperative agreements is often specified (and their terms 
outlined) in a park's enabling legislation. 

cooperator — ( 1 ) A cooperating association. (2 ) A private owner 
(individual or organization) which owns and often man- 
ages a site or facility within a national park, usually under 
a cooperative agreement. 

CPO — Chief Petty Officer, commonly called "Chief; the senior 
non-commissioned officers in the Navy; equivalent of 



1202 



Appendix D, Glossary 



sergeant first class in the Army and gunnery sergeant in 
the Marine Corps. 

crane — A mechanical device for lifting objects. Cranes can be fixed 
or traveling. See also bridge crane; crawler crane; der- 
rick; floating crane; hammerhead crane; locomotive 
crane; portal crane; shears; truck crane 

crane ship ( AB) — The former battleship Kearsarge (BB-5), con- 
verted to a non-self-propelled floating crane ship by the 
Philadelphia Navy Yard in 1920. In 1940, the vessel was 
renamed Crane Ship No. 1 to allow the name to be as- 
signed to a new aircraft carrier, but she was usually re- 
ferred to as Kearsarge rather than her official name until 
sold for scrap in 1955. 

crawler crane — A self-propelled traveling crane utilizing tank-type 
treads (tracks) rather than wheels. 

cribbing — A support structure for a pier, wharf, etc., generally 
square in shape, consisting of rows of heavy timbers laid 
in alternate directions on each other. 

cruiser (CA/CL) — A steel warship of sufficient size and power to 
operate independently to protect merchant vessels and 
raid enemy commerce; considered to be the successor to 
the frigate of the wooden sailing Navy. Under the Lon- 
don Naval Treaty of 1930, cruisers having a main arma- 
ment of 6-inch guns or smaller were classified as light 
cruisers (CL), while those with larger guns were classi- 
fied as heavy cruisers (CA). In the 1 950s, the Navy began 
to arm cruisers with guided missiles (CAG/CG/CGN/CLG). 

cultural landscape — A geographic area, including both cultural 
and natural resources, associated with events, persons, 
design styles, or ways of life that are significant in Ameri- 
can history, landscape architecture, archeology, engineer- 
ing, and culture. Also known as a historic landscape. 

cultural resource — An aspect of a cultural system that is valued 
by or significantly representative of a culture or that con- 
tains significant information about a culture such as his- 
toric properties and museum objects. 

cutter — The generic designation of a ship belonging to the U.S. 
Coast Guard and its predecessor Revenue Cutter Ser- 
vice. 

deck — The horizontal surfaces of a ship. The term is often used to 
refer to the floors of a naval building (e.g., second deck). 

decommissioning — A ceremony at which a naval vessel is placed 
out of commission and allocated to a reserve fleet. 

DERP-FUDS — Defense Environmental Restoration Program For- 
merly Used Defense Sites; program administered by the 
Army Corps of Engineers to clean up and remediate haz- 
ardous materials at former military installations disposed 
of before passage of strict environmental cleanup and 
protection legislation. 

deperming — Magnetic treatment of a steel ship's hull to minimize 
permanent magnetism as protection against mines. 

derrick — A device for lifting heavy weights consisting of an angled 
boom attached to a mast. 

destroyer (DD) — A warship, originally designated as torpedo boat 
destroyer, intended to protect the larger ships of a naval 
fleet from enemy torpedo boats. The destroyer, affection- 
ately called a "tin can" by crew members, evolved into a 




Crawler Crane — Crawler cranes used tracks rather than wheels for 
movement. Originally numbered 76, Crawler Crane 42-00489 was built by 
the Koehring Co. of Milwaukee (Model 803, s/n 2464) and was placed in 
service on Mar. 30, 1943. For many years, it was equipped with an 
electromagnet and assigned to the yard's scrapyard. This Dec. 11,1 967, 
photograph documents an accident in which the boom buckled. It was 
repaired and remained in service until the yard's closure. BOSTS-13347 

multi-purpose vessel with weapons to combat both sub- 
marine and aerial attack, as well as to provide shore bom- 
bardment support. In the post World War II period, a 
number of destroyers were converted into radar picket 
destroyers (DDR). Most modern destroyers are armed 
with guided missiles (DDG). 

destroyer escort — see escort ship 

destroyer tender (AD) — see tender 

die — A metal block used in a die-press or hammer that punches 
shaped holes in, cuts, or forms metal. 

die sinker (also die-sinker; diesinker) — A worker who lays out, 
machines, and finishes dies. 

die-lock chain — Forged steel chain made up of a stem piece in- 
serted into a socket and locked into place by means of 
pressure exerted on a die by a hammer. 

die-press — A machine which uses high-pressure rather than a drop 
to form metal using a die. 

disestablishment — A ceremony at which a naval shore establish- 
ment or other activity is closed or discontinued. 

dispensary — A medical facility that treats patients, usually on an 
outpatient basis. Often referred to informally by naval 
personnel as sickbay, after the primary medical treatment 
space on board a naval vessel. 

district craft — see service craft 

dock — ( 1 ) n. A protected water area in which vessels are moored. 
The term is often used to denote a pier or a wharf. (2) v. To 
bring a ship up against a wharf or pier or into a dry dock. 

dock landing ship — see LSD 

DOD (also DoD) — Department of Defense 

DOI — Department of the Interior. See also USDI 

dolphin — A cluster of pilings used either as a mooring or to protect 
vessels in a wide slip from being struck by other vessels 
being docked or undocked. 

double end gunboat see gunboat 

DPDO Defense Property Disposition Office 



1203 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 




Exchange — As these 1 964 photographs show, the Navy Exchange provided a large variety of products to military personnel. The main facility in Building 
38 (left) sold a wide range of goods, including cigarettes, jewelry, film, and housewares, while the Bottled Goods Store in Building 4 (right) sold all types 
of potables. The Navy Yard Exchange also operated a Gasoline Station (Building 194). BOSTS-16089 (left); BOSTS-16078 (right) 



drop-forge — see hammer 

dry dock (originally dry-dock; sometimes drydock) — An enclosed 
basin fitted with water tight entrance gates or caissons 
which permit the dock to be pumped dry, used for building 
or repairing a ship below the waterline. Permanent dry 
docks are sometimes referred to as graving docks. See 
also floating dry dock 

EA— seeETR/EIS 

EDIC — Economic Development & Industrial Corporation of Bos- 
ton; quasi-independent agency established under state 
law in 1971 to promote economic and industrial develop- 
ment in Boston. In 1995 the EDIC was brought under the 
administrative umbrella of the Boston Redevelopment 
Authority (BRA). 

EIR/EIS — environmental impact report/environmental impact state- 
ment; a planning document prepared pursuant to NEPA or 
equivalent state laws when a proposed action or project 
has the potential for significant impact on the human en- 
vironment. An environmental assessment (EA) is a brief 
document prepared to determine whether the impact of a 
proposed action could be significant requiring the comple- 
tion of an EIS or to document compliance with NEPA for a 
proposal that will have no significant impacts. 

enabling legislation — The act of Congress that establishes a na- 
tional park. It may include a park's boundaries, set the 
parameters for how the park is managed, describe its inter- 
pretive themes and significance, and/or mandate special 
conditions of operation. 

engine house ( also engine-house; enginehouse) — A building hous- 
ing a steam engine used to power industrial machines, 
usually through a scries of shafts and pulleys. The boil- 
ers used to create the steam for the engine were often 
housed in a separate boilerhouse. Sec also powerhouse 

ensign — ( 1 ) A flag, particularly the national flag. (2) A naval rank 
established in 1 862 equivalent to second lieutenant in the 
Air Eorce, Army, or Marine Corps; replaced passed mid- 
shipman. 

escort carrier (CVE) — A small aircraft carrier, often informally 
referred to as a "jeep carrier," originally conceived to 
pro\ ide aerial protection for merchant convoys. Initially 



classified as aircraft escort vessel ( AVG) and then auxil- 
iary aircraft carrier (ACV), they were reclassified from 
auxiliaries to combatants in July 1943. Although a few 
escort carriers saw combat service in the Korean War. 
most were either never reactivated after World War II or 
used simply as aircraft transports ( AKV). 

escort ship (DE) (originally escort vessel) — A warship similar in 
design to but smaller than a destroyer, originally intended 
for anti-submarine warfare in protection of merchant con- 
voys. Because of their type symbol, "DE," escort vessels 
were almost immediately, but incorrectly, referred to as 
"destroyer escorts." In the 1975 revision of the Navy's 
ship classifications, escort ships became frigates (FF). 

exchange (also Navy exchange) — A facility on a navy base for 
naval personnel and their dependents that sells items not 
provided by the government at a small profit for the ben- 
efit of the welfare and recreation fund. Commonly called a 
"PX," from post exchange, the designation of a similar 
facility on an Air Force, Army, or Marine base. 

executive officer — see XO 

Fargo Building — see Navy Building 

fathom — A unit of measurement used for water depth and for mate- 
rial such as cables and ropes, equal to 6 feet. 

FHWA — Federal Highway Administration 

finger pier — A small pier that projects from a larger pier. 

fitting out -- The process of completing a ship after it has been 
launched, usually at a fitting-out basin, quay, or pier, and 
involving the addition of superstructure, armament, fur- 
nishings, and all other equipment required to make the 
ship ready for service. Also called "outfitting." although 
that term is more often limited to installation of furnish- 
ings and equipment. 

flag officer — ( 1 ) Term used to denote admirals and generals, who 
are entitled to have a flag bearing the number of stars 
equivalent to their rank flown when present on a naval 
vessel or shore establishment. The Marine Corps and 
other military services use general officer instead of flag 
officer. (2) A naval designation established in 1857 for 
captains in command of squadrons: replaced in 1862 by 
the ranks of commodore and rear admiral. 



1204 



Appendix D, Glossary 



fleet — A formal organization of warships and other naval vessels, 
under the command of an admiral. In U.S. Navy practice, 
fleets are known by names (e.g., Atlantic Fleet) and num- 
bers (e.g., 6th Fleet), with even-numbered fleets located in 
the Atlantic and odd-numbered fleets in the Pacific. A 
fleet may be administratively and/or operationally divided 
into battle groups, squadrons, and/or task forces. See 
also squadron 

fleet admiral (FADM) — see admiral 

fleet train — A term used through World War II to denote naval 
auxiliaries assigned to a fleet. 

Federal Lands Highway Program (FLHP) — Ajoint program of the 
FH WA and the NPS that provides planning, design, and 
construction funding for deteriorating national park roads 
and alternative modes of transportation in parks. 

float — A raft-like platform such as a camel used alongside a pier or 
a ship. 

floating crane (also floating derrick) (YD) — A crane or derrick 
mounted on a barge that can be moved from one location 
to another. 

floating dry dock — A structure that can be submerged to permit the 
entry and docking of a ship and then raised to lift the ship 
out of the water for repairs. Large naval floating dry docks 
intended for use at advance bases often had portal cranes 
operating along the top of the dock's side walls. 

floating pile driver ( YPD) — A barge containing a hammer-like de- 
vice, usually powered by steam, for driving piles into the 
seabed, used for the contruction and maintenance of wa- 
terfront facilities such as seawalls and piers. 

floating workshop ( YR) — Informally known as a repair barge. A 
specialized Navy barge equipped as a workshop for use 
alongside ships. During and after World War II, the Navy 
developed a series of specialized floating workshops 
( YRDH/YRDM/YRR) as well as ones which also served 
as repair and berthing barges (YRB/YRBM). 

fore-and-aft rigged — A ship with triangular sails mounted on masts 
and jib booms or gaffs parallel to the ship's keel. 

forge — A facility that specializes in the forging of metals to impart 
shape and toughness to rough castings, using both hand 
tools and machinery such as hammers and die-presses. 
Also called a "smithery." 

foundry — A facility that specializes in the casting of metal compo- 
nents that are subject to further forging or machining op- 
erations to provide components for a ship. 

FRAM — Fleet Rehabilitation And Modernization; program to mod- 
ernize World War Il-era naval vessels for continued ser- 
vice into the 1 960s. Originally established for destroyers, 
but later used to describe modernization of any warship. 

frames — The skeleton structure, or ribs, of a vessel, extending 
upward from a ship's keel. Frames are generally numbered 
from bow to stem. 

Frazier Barracks — The Receiving Station facility in Building 33 
of the Charlestown Navy Yard, named for Daniel Frazier, a 
seaman on USS Enterprise wounded in action off Tripoli 
in 1804. 

"rigate — (1) A ship-rigged sailing warship having guns on two 
decks, intended to both protect merchant vessels and raid 




Foundry, Mold — A large number of molds can be seen in the fore- 
ground of this June 1901 view of the interior of the brass and iron foundry 
located in Building 1 6. These molds consist of frames containing wet sand 
formed around a pattern to create the cavity into which molten metal was 
poured. BOSTS-9279 

enemy commerce. (2) A steel warship (PF) equivalent in 
size and function to an escort ship but constructed dur- 
ing World War II for the Navy under the auspices of the 
Maritime Commission to civilian rather than military stan- 
dards. (3) A steel warship (DL/DLG) intermediate in size 
between a destroyer and a cruiser, originally designated 
as destroyer leader. All existing frigates were reclassified 
as destroyers or cruisers in 1975. (4) A warship smaller 
than a destroyer, termed escort ship until 1975, when the 
U.S. Navy revised its nomenclature to correspond to that 
used by other world navies. Existing escort ships were 
reclassified as frigates by changing the "DE" type symbol 
to "FF" without a change to their serial numbers. 

fuel ship — see oiler 

FY — Fiscal Year; government accounting period; until 1 842, the 
fiscal year and calendar year were identical; after a half 
year in 1843, the year ran from July 1 of the preceding 
calendar year to June 30 of the indicated year; after a 
transitional quarter in 1 976, the fiscal year ran from Octo- 
ber 1 of the preceding calendar year to September 30 of 
the indicated year. 

gaff — A spar extending diagonally upward from a mast. 

galley — The kitchen on a naval vessel or mess hall. Most galleys 
serve cafeteria-style. The term is often used as a syn- 
onym for the entire mess or mess hall. 

gangplank — see brow 

gantry crane — see portal crane 

General Management Plan — sec G MP 

general storehouse — A warehouse for all types of supplies and 
equipment, other than ordnance. 

GMP — General Management Plan; a master plan prepared for a 
unit of the National Park System setting out the general 
goals of the park and how those objectives are to be met. 

guided missile - A weapon powered by a rocket motor whose 
flight path is capable of being altered by a mechanism 
within the missile. Early shipboard missiles such as Talos 
and Terrier were intended to replace anti-aircraft guns; 
later missiles such as Polaris and Tomahawk were offen- 
sive weapons used against land targets. 



1 205 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 




Head — The term "head" was traditionally used for shore-based toilet 
facilities as well as those aboard ship. These two views were taken in 
May 1972 to document the repainting of a head in an unidentified yard 
building. Note the trough used as a urinal and the lack of doors on the toilet 



stalls. 



BOSTS-9759 



gun — A naval cannon of either muzzle-loading or breech-loading 
type of any size or calibre above that of small arms. Sail- 
ing warships were generally classified by the nominal num- 
ber of guns carried. 

gunboat (PG) — A small warship intended primarily to defend a 
coast or protect national interests in overseas areas such 
as colonies, the Caribbean, or China. Civil War-era double 
end gunboats were sidewheelers intended to operate along 
the coasts and in the rivers of the South. In modern navies, 
gunboats are often equipped with guided missiles rather 
than guns. 

H ABS — Historic American Buildings Survey; a program managed 
by the NPS initiated in 1934 which provides documenta- 
tion in the form of measured drawings and photographs 
of historic buildings. The survey products are deposited 
in the Library of Congress. 

HAER — Historic American Engineering Record; a program man- 
aged by the NPS initiated in 1 969 as a companion to HABS 
which provides documentation in the form of measured 
drawings and photographs of nationally and regionally 
significant engineering and industrial sites. The survey 
products are deposited in the Library of Congress. 

HALS — Historic American Landscapes Survey; a program man- 
aged by the NPS initiated in 2000 as a companion to HABS 
and HAER which provides documentation in the form of 
measured drawings and photographs of historic land- 
scapes. The survey products are deposited in the Library 
of Congress. 

hammer — A machine designed to forge metal by dropping a me- 
chanically raised weight onto it, either directly or through 
a die. Also known as a drop-forge. 

hammerhead crane — A large crane with a fixed counterbalancing 
jib used primarily for building and outfitting ships at ship- 
yards. 

Harbor Commissioners'' line — The formal water boundary line of 
a waterfront property. 

head The sanitary facilities on board a naval ship. The term is 
also used to refer to similar facilities at a shore establish- 
ment. 

heaving down — A method of repairing the bottoms of ships which 
involved stripping the ship and pulling it over to one side. 
This method was time-consuming and put considerable 
stress on a ship's frame. Also known as careening. 

hemp house (originally hemp-house) — A facility for the storage of 
hemp intended for use in the manufacture of rope. 

historic character — The sum of all visual aspects, features, mate- 
rials, and spaces associated with a property's history. 

historic district — A geographically definable area possessing a 



significant concentration, linkage, or continuity of sites, 
landscapes, structures, or objects, unified by past events 
or aesthetically by plan or physical developments. A dis- 
trict may also be composed of individual elements sepa- 
rated geographically but linked by association or history. 

historic landscape — see cultural landscape 

historic leasing — A program for the lease of historic structures 
owned by the NPS to private individuals or organizations. 
Under such leases, the lessee assumes responsibility for 
rehabilitation of the structure and the proceeds of the 
lease become available for use on other historic preserva- 
tion projects within the park. Unlike cooperative agree- 
ments, historic leases do not have to involve provision of 
visitor services to the public. 

Historic Monument Area (HMA) — That portion of the Boston 
Naval Shipyard transferred to the BRA under the most 
extensive historic preservation restrictions, generally en- 
compassing that portion of the yard east of Sixth St. and 
north of First Ave. 

historic property — A district, site, structure, or landscape signifi- 
cant in American history, architecture, engineering, arche- 
ology, or culture; an umbrella term for all entries in the 
National Register. 

historic scene — The overall appearance of a cultural landscape 
and its surroundings as it was in the historic period that 
provides the context for understanding and interpreting 
the events, ideas, or persons associated with a historic 
property. 

historic structure — A constructed work usually immovable by 
nature or design, consciously created to serve some hu- 
man activity, including buildings; monuments; dams; 
roads; railroad tracks; canals; mill races; bridges; tunnels; 
locomotives and rolling stock; ships; stockades, forts and 
associates earthworks; Indian mounds; ruins; fences; and 
outdoor sculpture. 

historic site — (1) The site of a significant event, prehistoric or 
historic occupation or activity, or structure or landscape 
(extant or vanished), where the site itself possesses his- 
torical, cultural, or archeological value apart from the value 
of any existing structure or landscape. (2) A historic prop- 
erty that is managed to preserve and interpret its historic, 
cultural, or archeological values. 

historical integrity — The authenticity of a historic property's his- 
toric identity, evidenced by the survival of physical char- 
acteristics that existed during its prehistoric or historic 
period; the extent to which a historic structure or cultural 
landscape retains its historic appearance. 

historical significance — The meaning or value ascribed to a his- 
toric property based on the National Register criteria for 
evaluation. It normally stems from a combination of asso- 
ciation and historical integrity. 

hospital ship (AH) A naval auxiliary intended to provide medical 
care to military personnel, particularly off combat areas. 



1206 



Appendix D, Glossary 



^99 






^ 1 t ^1 







Hull Number, Float — Yard painters use a float as they paint the new 
hull number on the bow of USS Decatur (DDG-31 ) as her 1 965-67 conver- 
sion to a guided missile destroyer nears completion. BOSTS-10895 

Under the Geneva Convention, hospital ships are unarmed 
and painted white with distinctive red cross markings to 
protect them from attack. Navy hospital ships were gen- 
erally commanded by an officer from the Medical Corps 
rather than a line officer. Note: Through World War II, 
the Army operated its own fleet of hospital ships. 

host activity — The naval or other government agency organization 
which owns or has overall jurisdiction over a particular 
base and provides services to tenant activities as set forth 
in support agreements with them. 

hotel services — Shore-based utilities such as electricity, water, 
compressed air, and steam, provided to ships berthed at a 
pier. 

house — ( 1 ) In the 1 9th century, a term used to denote an industrial 
or other non-residential building, usually preceded by a 
term defining its use (e.g., gatehouse). (2) A large wooden 
structure erected over the spar deck of a Receiving Ship 
or a ship in ordinary to provide additional space or pro- 
tect the ship from the weather. See also boilerhouse; coal 
house; engine house; general storehouse; hemp house; 
muster house; powerhouse; pumphouse; roundhouse; 
shiphouse; storehouse; tarring house 

hull number — The official identification number assigned to a 
naval vessel in accordance with a general order issued in 
July 1920, so called because it is usually painted on the 
ship's bow and stern quarters. Hull numbers consist of 
two elements, an alphabetical type symbol and a numerical 
serial number. Warships display only the number; auxilia- 
ries display the type symbol minus the initial "A"; service 
craft display the entire designation. Hull numbers origi- 
nally were shown in the NVR with no space or punctua- 
tion (DD121); currently they are shown with a space 
(CG 10). In common usage, the symbol and serial number 
are separated by a hyphen (AB-1 ). 

icebreaker (AGB) — A naval auxiliary with a strengthened hull 
designed to break through ice fields. Navy icebreakers 
were used largely to support Operation Deep Freeze ac- 
tivities in Antarctica. In the mid- 1960s, all Navy icebreak- 
ers were transferred to the U.S. Coast Guard, which as- 



sumed responsibility for all government icebreaking ac- 
tivities. 

in commission — A warship or naval-manned auxiliary in active 
service. The names of ships in commission are preceded 
by the prefix USS. 

in service — A civilian-manned naval auxiliary or a service craft in 
active service. 

inactivation — The process of preparing a ship to be placed in a 
reserve fleet 

inclining experiment — Frequently done in the course of major 
shipyard overhauls, inclining experiments involved shift- 
ing heavy weights on board a ship in order to determine 
her stability characteristics. Photographs of inclining 
experiments are often very detailed, and provide an excel- 
lent record of a ship's equipment and general external 
arrangement, as well as adjoining piers and buildings. 

Industrial Department — Established in navy yards under a 1 9 1 7 
general order and modified in a 1 92 1 administrative reor- 
ganization, the Industrial Department, headed by a man- 
ager, was responsible for all industrial production and the 
physical plant of the yard. 

integrity — see historical integrity 

ironclad — A wooden warship covered with iron plate to provide 
protection against enemy gunfire. The term is often used 
as a synonym for monitor because most U.S. Navy 
ironclads were of that design. 

jack — A flag corresponding to the union or canton (upper left 
quadrant) of the ensign. Flown on a jackstaff at the bow 
of naval vessels in port. 

jetty — A landing wharf or pier. 

jib (also jib boom) — ( 1 ) A spar forming the support for a triangular 
sail on a ship. (2) The arm or boom of a crane or derrick. 

joiner — A carpenter who constructs doors, window sashes, pan- 
eling, cabinetry, and other permanent woodwork. 

keel — The timber or series of connected steel plates running from 
stem to sternpost on the bottom of the centerline of a 
vessel, to which vertical frames are attached. 

keel blocks — Blocks, usually of wood or concrete topped with 
wood, on which the keel of a vessel rests when being 
built, or when she is in dry dock. Keel blocks enable 
workers to gain full access to the underside of a ship. 

keel laying — The formal start of the construction of a vessel. Keel 
laying could be done with or without ceremony. 

landing craft — Small boats designed to be carried by an amphibi- 
ous warfare ship to discharge troops and small vehicles 
on a beach via a bow ramp. Numerous varieties of such 
craft exist, including the landing craft, medium (LCM) 
and the landing craft, vehicle/personnel (LCVP) 
("Higgins"boat). 

latrine — A communal toilet often found in or in conjunction with a 
military barracks. In naval facilities, a latrine is usually 
referred to as a head. 

launching — The point at which a ship's hull enters the water for 
the first time, either by sliding down inclined ways or by 
flooding of the building dock. Launchings were generally 
ceremonial occasions that included the christening, or 
naming, ceremony. 



1207 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Shipyard Trades: A Gallery 



THE VAST MAJORITY of shipyard workers belonged to one of 
the numerous skilled trades which were required to build and 
maintain ships. Most of these "mechanics" learned their trade on 
the job as helpers or apprentices. The Navy Yard instituted its first 
appenticeship program in 1817. 

Shipyard trades evolved through the years, becoming more 
specialized as ships changed from wood and sail to steel and steam. 
Among the classifications of yard employees in the 19th century 
were shipwrights (carpenters, sawyers, joiners, sparmakers, 
boatbuilders), painters, sailmakers, blacksmiths, caulkers, riggers, 
coopers, ropemakers, machinists, plumbers, and coppersmiths. 



As ships became more complex in the late 1 9th and 20th centu- 
ries, many of these trades evolved to meet new needs and were 
augmented with new classes of workers such as boilermakers. 
pipefitters, shipfitters (including riveters, drillers, welders, and 
sheetmetal workers), foundrymen, forgers, patternmakers, electri- 
cians, and electronics technicians. 

This gallery presents a selection of images of trades employed 
in the shipyard, covering both 19th and 20th centuries. Due to the 
nature of government employment, some of the men shown in group 
photographs may have borne different job titles. 




Boatbuilder — The boatbuilder classification covered tasks involved in 
the construction of small boats. Here workers apply plastic (fiberglass) to 
a section of a 26-ft. motor whaleboat under construction in May 1 957. 

BOSTS-7745 




Caulker — Caulkers performed an important task during the age of wooden 
ships in sealing joints to make them waterproof. This illustration appeared 
in Harper's New Monthly Magazine in 1 862. Mystic Seaport 




Boilermaker — Boilermakers dealt with the main propulsion systems of 
steamships. Here, Boilermaker Philip A. Ruggiero holds the torch to "light 
off' the boilers on USS Decatur (DDG-31 ) in Jan. 1 967. In the foreground 
is Helper Boilermaker Richard E. Black. BOSTS-10914 




Coppersmith — Coppersmiths in the 1 9th century, in addition to making 
articles of copper for use onboard ships, performed the vital task of cover- 
ing the underwater hull of vessels with copper sheets. Mystic Seaport 



] 208 



Appendix D, Glossary 



Shipyard Trades: A Gallery 











Driver — The driver, sometimes called a teamster, was an important cog 
in the operation of the yard, responsible for moving materiel throughout the 
facility. Drivers such as William Costello, seen here with his team on May 
30, 1917, were the predecessors of the truck drivers and equipment op- 
erators of the mechanized yard of the later 20th century. BOSTS-9135 





Electrician — Electricians dealt with wiring and electrical components 
both on ships and within the yard. This 1964 image shows Electrician 
David A. Rose, who later became Facilities Manager for Boston National 
Historical Park, posing for a Boston Globe photographer on one of the 
yard's piers. BNHP 



Electronics Technician — Beginning in World War II, ships began to be 
equipped with increasingly complex electronics systems such as radar 
and sonar. These systems required sophisticated testing equipment such 
as that being operated by Electronics Technician George R. Acquaviva 
during the mid-1960s. BOSTS-16131 





Forger — While electricians and electronics technicians joined the yard 
workforce in response to technological advances, other trades merely 
evolved from simpler to more complex activities. The forger was the direct 
descendent of the early blacksmiths. Here Forger John J. Miller is about to 
place a socket member on the stem of a section of 4.75-in. die-lock chain. 

BOSTS-9672 

Foundryman — Foundrymen John O'Brien and Doug Ginsberg pour mol- 
ten aluminum into a mold for 2.5-in. chain. BOSTS-9450 



1209 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Shipyard Trades: A Gallery 




Joiner — The joiner was a specialist carpenter who manufactured fin- 
ished woodwork, including furniture, for ships. Here Quarterman Joiner 
George W. Burroughs (center, in dark hat) poses with a group of joiners in 
the Joiners Shop (Building 36) in Dec. 1 897. 

Burroughs Collection, Bostonian Society 





Machinist — Machinists fabricated numerous components for ships using 
a variety of machines such as lathes, drills, and presses. This June 1 3, 
1913, view of the Machine Shop (Building 42) shows the numerous belts 
which ran the machines from overhead shafts prior to the introduction of 
individual electric motors for each machine. BOSTS-9433 




Patternmaker — Patternmakers formed the wooden patterns from which 
molds were made for casting items in the Foundry. BOSTS-7755 



Painter — Shipyard painters often worked under difficult conditions. On 
Dec. 1 6, 1 970, a painter sprays the hull of USS Little Rock (CLG-4) in Dry 
Dock 3 from scaffolding supported by a forklift. BOSTS-11814 

Pipefitter — Like electricians, pipefitters worked on both ships and yard 
maintenance. Here Foreman (Leadingman) Pipefitter Marshall G. Soderblum 
watches Pipefitters Lawrence L. Ferranti and James F. Erricolo adjust a 
steam pressure valve in Dec. 1967. BOSTS-7736 




1210 



Appendix D, Glossary 



Shipyard Trades: A Gallery 





Rigger — The term "rigger" encompassed more than one occupation. 
While the term is most often associated with the individuals who fabricate 
items out of rope, it also applied to men who were involved in the operation 
of cranes and other heavy lifting equipment. Here Foreman (Leadingman) 
Rigger Horace Grosshandler (center) supervises Riggers Jacob K. Mulley 
(left) and John Carr in lifting a 5-ton test weight onto the destroyer USS 
Fiske (DD-842) in Dec. 1 967. BOSTS-7740 



Rigger — One of the oldest shipyard trades was that of rigger, respon- 
sible for the miles of rope used on sailing ships. Although used in far 
smaller quantities in the modern age, rope remains a critical item for naval 
vessels. Here riggers splice together a piece of nylon rope in Sept. 1 970. 

BOSTS-9307 




Sheetmetal Worker — Over time, technology automated many tasks 
previously done manually. This June 8, 1967, image shows Sheetmetal 
Workers Robert W. Benson (left) and Ernest Benedetto demonstrating the 
yard's new numerically controlled turret-punch press, which saved time 
by repeatedly and more precisely punching holes into metal plates. 

BOSTS-7732 




Welder — As all-welded hulls replaced riveted hulls, the welder assumed 
greater importance in the yard. Here a welder works on the construction 
of USS Sur7o//<Counry(LST-1173) in early 1956. BOSTS-14320 



I21I 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 




■ 



laydown area (also laydown space) — Outside storage areas in a 
navy yard used for materials, usually for immediate use 
and close to or on piers in contrast to organized storage 
areas such as parks or plate fields which held material in 
long-term storage. 

LCM — see landing craft 

LCS — List of Classified Structures; the official National Park Ser- 
vice listing of all historic structures under its jurisdiction. 

lead yard (also design yard) — The shipyard responsible for the 
design and/or construction of the first ship in a particular 
class or conversion program. The lead yard prepares plans 
and specifications and distributes them to other shipyards 
involved with the class or conversion. 

lieutenant (LT) — A naval rank equivalent to captain in the Air 
Force, Army, or Marine Corps. 

lieutenant commander (LCDR) — A naval rank equivalent to major 
in the Air Force, Army, or Marine Corps. 

lieutenant junior grade (LTJG) (also lieutenant (j.g.)) — Anaval 
rank equivalent of first lieutenant in the Air Force, Army, 
or Marine Corps; established in 1 883 in place of master. 

lighter — A barge or other craft used to move materials or equip- 
ment, either self-propelled or moved by tugs. Navy light- 
ers are generally identified by their employment, e.g., ash 
lighter ( YA); open lighter (originally coal barge) ( YC); 
ammunition lighter (YE); freight lighter (later covered 
lighter) (YF/YFN); garbage lighter (YG/YGN); fuel oil 
lighter (YO/YON). 

lightship ( AL) — An anchored, manned, floating navigational aid in 
the form of a ship. All American lightships were operated 
by the U.S. Coast Guard and its predecessor U.S. Light- 
house Service (originally the U.S. Lighthouse Board) and 
have been replaced by automated fixed devices. 

limited duty officer ( LDO) — see line officer 

line — Rope used on board a ship other than the standing rigging 
or the cable used for securing the anchor. 

line officer — A naval officer whose primary training and responsi- 
bility is in area of naval operations. There are few 
restructions on assignments which can be given to line 



Mast — Although modern naval masts are constructed of metal rather than 
wood, old traditions continue to be followed. Navy Yard Production Officer 
Capt. T.T. McGillicuddy places a coin in position during the traditional "step- 
ping the mast" ceremony for the new main mast of USS Decatur (DDG-31 ) 
on Mar. 30, 1966. BOSTS-10895 



Lightship — Lightships were officially designated only by number, but were commonly referred 
to by the name of their station, painted in large letters on their sides. Light Vessel No. 4 was a 
schooner-rigged ship built at the Boston Navy Yard in 1 855 (listed in yard records under the name 
Brilliant) and originally assigned to the Bishop & Clerks location in Vineyard Sound. From 1858 to 
1916, she served Handkerchief Shoal, after which she became a relief vessel until retired in 1 924 
and sold. U.S. Coast Guard 



officers, whereas limited duty officers (LDO). either line 
officers or staff officers belonging to one of the Navy's 
specialized corps (e.g., Civil Engineering Corps; Construc- 
tion Corps; Chaplains Corps; Medical Corps; Nurse 
Corps; Supply Corps), are generally restricted to assign- 
ments within their area of technical expertise. 

locomotive crane — A self-propelled crane operating on standard- 
gauge railroad tracks. 

loft — A term used to denote particular shops which generally did 
not require heavy equipment, probably derived from their 
location on the upper floor, or loft, of a building. See also 
mold loft; riggers loft; sail loft 

LSD — Landing Ship, Dock; an amphibious warship containing a 
large well at the stern which can be ballasted down to 
allow landing craft to be floated out through a stern gate. 

LST — Landing Ship, Tank; a shallow-draft amphibious warship 
designed to discharge tanks and other vehicles directly 
onto a beach by means of a ramp lowered through open 
doors in the ship's bow. Originally designated by the 
Navy as tank landing craft ( ATL) but redesignated LST 
in July 1 942 before any were actually built, the LSTs were 
not assigned names until July 1 955, when surviving ships 
were named for counties. Many LSTs were completed as 
or converted into repair ships. 

machine shop — A facility that specializes in the machining of metal 
components to create their final shape and size by use of 
machine tools such as lathes, shapers, drill presses, 
punches, automatic screw machines, etc. 




1212 



Appendix D, Glossary 



machinery — The propulsion plant (boilers, engines, generators, 
motors, propellers, shafts, etc.) of a ship. 

MACRIS — Massachusetts Cultural Resource Information Sys- 
tem; a database maintained by the Massachusetts His- 
torical Commission (MHC) listing historic properties and 
areas in Massachusetts based on inventories conducted 
by the MHC and local historical commissions. 

magazine — A facility for the storage of ammunition and explo- 
sives. Shore-based magazines were usually built of heavy 
masonry and sometimes insulated with earth, and were 
often located in remote locations to minimize damage in 
case of explosion. 

Manager — A short form for Manager of the Industrial Department. 
Established in 1 92 1 , the position supervised all non-mili- 
tary functions of the shipyard, while the Captain of the 
Yard supervised the Military Department. The shipyard 
manager became the shipyard commander in Nov. 1 945 . 

marginal wharf — A wharf which runs parallel to the shore. 

Marine — A member of the U.S. Marine Corps, an independent 
military service under the Department of the Navy serving 
both on land and on sea. In addition to their combat 
functions, Marines provide security at naval shore estab- 
lishments and at United States diplomatic missions abroad. 

marine railway — A facility built on an incline consisting of a cradle 
mounted on tracks which can be lowered into the water to 
permit the docking a ship and then hauled out of the water 
to allow repairs to the hull. 

Massport — Massachusetts Port Authority (MPA); quasi-indepen- 
dent state agency established in 1956 (effective Feb. 1959) 
responsible for managing and developing the port of Bos- 
ton, including Logan International Airport; successor to 
the Mystic River Bridge Authority and the Port of Boston 
Commission. 

mast — ( 1 ) A tall, heavy, wooden installed upright on a sailing ship 
to primarily support its rigging and sails or a tubular steel 
or aluminum post installed upright on a steel ship to sup- 
port radio antennas, signal flags, radar, and other equip- 
ment. Installation of a mast was often a ceremonial occa- 
sion called "stepping the mast" where coins were placed 
under the bottom of the mast to ensure good luck. (2) A 
flagpole or radio antenna. 

master — (1 ) A naval rank, originally a warrant officer position 
known as sailing master, established in 1 862, equivalent 
to a first lieutenant in the Army or Marine Corps. Changed 
to lieutenant junior grade in 1883. (2) The title of the 
captain of a merchant vessel or a civilian-manned vessel 
of the Military Sealift Command (MSC). (3) The title of the 
senior civilian worker within a particular shop in a ship- 
yard. Also known as master mechanic. 

master commandant — A naval rank directly below captain. Changed 
in 1 838 to commander. 

MEPA — Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act; the state equiva- 
lent of NEPA. 

mess — A group of people eating together on a ship. The space 
where this occurs is generally identified by the name of 
the group (e.g., CPO's mess; crew's mess). The officer's 
mess is more commonly known as the wardroom. 




Master — This group photograph showing Navy Yard shop masters shortly 
after World War I is one of the few such images available where all indi- 
viduals are identified. Front row (left to right): James Connerton, Foreman 
Ordnance; Samuel Irwin, Master Machinist (Outside); Hugh Doherty, Chief 
Progressman; William Campbell, Master Shipfitter; Edwin R. Thayer, Master 
Machinist (Inside); Max M. Goldman, Master Laborer and Rigger; Frederick 
A. Dodge, Master Painter; Ralph P. Kneeland, Master Mechanic (Power 
Plant). Middle row (left to right): William McCarthy, Master Coppersmith; 
Martin Tumbull, Master Ropemaker; William C. Nicholls, Master Boatbuilder; 
Charles Wettergreen, Quarterman Machinist (Inside); Charles E. Schofield, 
Master Shipfitter; James Oakes, Foreman Laborer (Supply); Neil McDonald, 
Quarterman Joiner; Albert M . Leahy, Master Mechanic (Forge Shop); James 
W. Cullinane, Master Sailmaker. Back row (left to right): William McCarthy, 
Foreman Ropemaker; Robert C. McKeown, Master Molder; George W. 
Burroughs, Master Joiner; William A. Bates, Master Patternmaker; Frederick 
T. Baker, Foreman Transportation; John Kearns, Quarterman Machinist (Out- 
side); Thomas P. Brennan, Foreman Laborer (Public Works); Wilbur C. Otis, 
Master Machanic (Public Works); James Reid, Master Mechanic (Forge 
Shop). BOSTS-13352 

mess hall — A facility at a barracks or other shore facility used for 
feeding military personnel. Also known as a dining hall. 
Facilities within shore establishments for civilian workers 
are generally known as cafeterias. 

MGH — Massachusetts General Hospital 

MHC - Massachusetts Historical Commission; a state agency, 
under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Common- 
wealth (Secretary of State), responsible for state historic 
preservation activities. The executive director of the MHC 




Mess Hall — The mess hall of Frazier Barracks (Building 33) is seen here 
in June 1958. BOSTS-15718 



I213 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



serves as the Massachusetts SHPO. 

MHD — Massachusetts Highway Department; also known as Mass 
Highways. 

midshipman — (1) Prior to 1 845, a warrant officer training for promo- 
tion to lieutenant through service at sea. (2) After 1 845, a 
student at the U.S. Naval Academy. Academy graduates 
were known as passed midshipmen until the rank of en- 
sign was created for them in 1 862. 

Military Department — Established in a 1921 administrative reor- 
ganization of navy yards, the Military Department, headed 
by the Captain of the Yard, oversaw non-industrial activi- 
ties including the Receiving Ship, the Marine detachment, 
inactive ships, and yard security. 

mine — A weapon consisting of a casing holding an explosive 
charge generally detonated upon contact with the hull of 
a vessel. Mines could float either on or below the surface 
of the water. Originally known as a torpedo. 

minecraft — A generic designation for both mine warfare ships and 
small craft employed in minelaying or minesweeping. 

minelayer (ACM/CM/CMc/MMA/MMC/MMF) - A warship de- 
signed to disperse floating mines at sea. 

minesweeper (AM/AMb/AMc/AMCU/AMS/MHC/MSC/MSF/ 
MSO) — A warship designed to search out and destroy 
floating mines at sea before they could damage other ships. 
Many minesweepers were converted from commercial fish- 
ing trawlers or tugs. 

MIP— see BMW 

- Measures taken to lessen the intensity of adverse 
effects on historic properties. Mitigation may include, 
among other alternatives, modification of a proposal to 
avoid the impacts, archeological data recovery, HABS/ 
HAER surveys, or development guidelines and preserva- 
tion restrictions. 

MMT — Massport Marine Terminal; area of BMIP including North 
Jetty and filled land between West Jetty and Pier 4 leased 
by EDIC to Massport; sometimes known as "Subaru Pier." 

MOA — Memorandum of agreement; a document prepared under 
Section 106 that records the terms and conditions agreed 
upon to resolve or in mitigation of the adverse effects of 
an undertaking upon historic properties. A MOA is usu- 
ally negotiated and signed by the federal agency involved, 
the SHPO, other interested parties, and, if necessary, the 
ACHP. 

mold — ( 1 ) The form into which molten metal is poured during the 
casting process in a foundry. Molds are made using pat- 
terns from a variety of material including sand, brick, etc. 
(2) The template or form used for the layout of the struc- 
tural members of a ship, drawn full-size in a mold loft. 

mold loft (originally mould loft) — The location where templates 
and forms are laid out and constructed to the exact shapes 
and dimensions which the finished timber or fabricated 
metal pieces for a ship must assume in the final work. 

monitor (BM) — An ironclad or steel warship featuring an extremely 
low freeboard hull and a main armament consisting of one 
or more guns in armored, rotating turrets. The name de- 
rived from the first such vessel, USS Monitor, completed 
in 1862. 




Mold Loft — The yard's final Mold Loft was on the upper level of the east 
extension of Building 1 04. In this photograph taken in late Dec. 1 954 or 
early Jan. 1 955, workers are laying out faring lines for hull sections of USS 
Suffolk Counfy(LST-1173). BOSTS-14317 

moor — To secure a ship alongside a pier or wharf or at an anchor- 
age in open water. 

mooring — (l) n. The arrangement of anchors, cables, etc., to se- 
cure a ship to a pier or at an anchorage. (2) v. The act of 
securing a ship to a wharf, pier, or dolphin or at an anchor- 
age. 

"mothball fleet" — see reserve fleet. 

motor vessel (MV; sometimes M/V) — A ship propelled by an inter- 
nal-combustion engine. 

MSC — Military Sealift Command (until 1 970, Military Sea Trans- 
portation Service [MSTS]); organization within the Navy 
established in 1948 responsible for the transportation of 
materiel and personnel by sea for the Department of De- 
fense and for the operation of fleet auxiliaries and special 
mission ships for the Navy. Ships under MSC control are 
civilian manned and use the prefix "T-" before their hull 
numbers and USNS in front of their names. 

MSTS — see MSC 

muster house — A facility where workmen were mustered, or gath- 
ered, at the beginning of a work day to receive their as- 
signments and at the end of the day to be paid. 

naming ceremony — see christening 

National Register — National Register of Historic Places. Estab- 
lished by the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) 
of 1966, the National Register of Historic Places is the 
official listing maintained by the National Park Service of 
the nation's historic and cultural resources, whether of 
local, state, or national significance. 

Naval Agent (also Navy Agent) — Acivilian presidential appointee 
assigned to a particular city who was responsible for all 
naval procurement activity in the area in the period prior 
to the Civil War. The position was abolished in July 1 865. 

Naval Air Station (NAS) — A naval station equipped with ramps, 
runways, hangers, and other facilities for the support of 
naval aircraft or seaplanes. In naval usage, the term pre- 
cedes the geographic location (e.g., NAS South Wey- 
mouth). 

Naval Ammunition Depot (NAD) A naval base housing maga- 
zines and workshops for the storage and manufacture of 
munitions and a pier to permit the transfer of ammunition 
to ships, usually extending over a large geographic area 
for safety. The terminology was adopted in Dec. 1916 to 



1214 



Appendix D, Glossary 



replace Naval Magazine. In naval usage, the term pre- 
cedes the geographic location (e.g., NAD Hingham). 

Naval Base (NavBase) — (1) I.e. A government-owned and operated 
facility that supports the operations of a naval unit or 
activity. (2) t/.r. After Nov. 1945, an administrative organi- 
zation that provides administrative support for various 
facilities including hospitals, shipyards, stations, etc., 
within a particular geographic area under the cognizance 
of the commandant of a naval district. For example, the 
following major activities were under Commander, Naval 
Base Boston: Marine Barracks Boston; Boston Naval 
Shipyard; Naval Air Station South Weymouth; Naval Hos- 
pital Boston, Chelsea; Naval Station Boston; SUPSHIPS 
Boston; SUPSHIPS Quincy. 

Naval Constructor — The Naval Constructor was a civilian who 
oversaw the construction and repair of ships in navy yards. 
In 1863 the position became a uniformed one. They were 
limited duty officers in the Construction Corps until 1 940, 
when they became line officers restricted to engineering 
duty only (EDO) . Before the establishment of the perma- 
nent position of Civil Engineer, the Naval Constructor 
also supervised public works projects in the yards. 

Naval District (NavDist) — An administrative organization within 
the Navy established in 1903 responsible for all naval shore 
establishments in a particular geographic area, designated 
by numbers. For example, the Nov. 1, 1970, edition of 
Catalog of Naval Shore Activities (OPNAV P09B3-105) 
lists the following major activities under Commandant, 
First Naval District: Naval Base Boston; Naval Base New- 
port; Naval Air Station Brunswick; Portsmouth Naval Ship- 
yard. See also 1ND;C0M0NE 

Naval Hospital (NavHosp) — A hospital for the treatment of naval 
personnel and their dependents, staffed by personnel from 
the Navy Medical Corps and Nurse Corps. 

Naval Magazine — see Naval Ammunition Depot 

Naval Shipyard (NSY; also NavShipYd) — see Navy Yard 

Naval Station (NavSta) — A naval base with support capability to 
include refuelling and resupply or warships on operational 
missions, but with limited facilities to conduct major re- 
pairs or refits. 

NAVFAC — Naval Facilities Engineering Command; established in 
1966 as the successor to the Bureau of Yards & Docks 
(BuDocks) . Responsible for all Navy public works. 

NAVSEA — Naval Sea Systems Command; established in 1974 
through the merger of the Naval Ordnance Systems Com- 
mand (NAVORD) and the Naval Ships Systems Command 
(NAVSHIP). Responsible for design, procurement, and 
maintenance of all naval ships and ordnance, other than 
aircraft. 

Navy Building — The Fargo Building on Summer Street in South 
Boston which served as headquarters for the First Naval 
District. The building today is owned by the Army and 
known as the Barnes Building. 

Navy Yard (NY; also NYd; sometimes shown as Navy- Yard) — A 
government-owned shipyard established for the construc- 
tion, conversion, outfitting, overhaul, refit, and/or repair 
of naval vessels. After Nov. 1945, termed "naval ship- 



yard." Most yards were officially referred to as "U.S. 
Navy Yard" followed by the location, either the larger city 
they were associated with or the name of the actual com- 
munity in which they were located (e.g., U.S. Navy Yard, 
New York, or U.S. Navy Yard, Brooklyn) . Informally, the 
locational name preceded the term, e.g., Charlestown Navy 
Yard. See also NY2 

NEPA — National Environmental Policy Act of 1969; federal law that 
established the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 
and set forth requirements for prior review of the environ- 
mental impact of federal projects. 

net laying ship/net tender (AN/YN) — A naval auxiliary designed to 
lay and maintain anti-submarine nets across the entrances 
to harbors, bases, etc. 

new area study — A formal planning study on the desirability and 
feasibility of adding a particular historic site, natural area, 
or recreation area to the National Park System. 

New Development Area (NDA) — That portion of the Boston Naval 
Shipyard sold to the BRA with minimal historic preserva- 
tion restrictions, generally encompassing that portion of 
the yard east of 8th St. and south of First Ave., and includ- 
ing Piers 5 through 1 1 . 

NHL — National Historic Landmark; a property designated by the 
Secretary of the Interior under the Historic Sites Act of 
1935 as having exceptional national historic significance. 
NHLs are automatically listed on the National Register. 

NHPA — National Historic Preservation Act of 1966; federal law 
which established the Advisory Council on Historic Pres- 
ervation (ACHP) and the National Register. Section 106 
provided for the review of the effect of federal undertak- 
ings on historic resources, while Section 110 directed fed- 
eral agencies to identify historic resources under their 
jurisdiction. 

no adverse effect — A determination under Section 106 that an 
action does not alter the characteristics that qualify a prop- 
erty for inclusion in the National Register in a manner 
that would diminish the integrity of the property. 

North Station Industrial Building — see 150 Causeway Street 

NPS — National Park Service 

NVR — Naval Vessel Register; the official list of the vessels of the 
U.S. Navy. See also stricken 

NY2 — Navy file code for Boston Navy Yard (Boston Naval Ship- 
yard); often seen as prefix to photograph negative num- 
bers. Files codes as shown in 1941 edition of the Navy 
Filing Manual with Navy abbreviations for the yards in 
parentheses: 

NY1 Portsmouth. N. H. (NYPorl) 
NY2 Boston, Mass. (NYBos) 
NY2-1 South Boston, Mass. 
NY3 New York. N. Y (NYNyk) 
NY4 Philadelphia, Pa. (NYPhil) 
NY5 Washington, D. C. (NYWash) 
NY6 Norfolk (Portsmouth). Va. (NYNor) 
NY7 Charleston, S.C. (NYCharl) 
NY8 Puget Sound, Bremerton. Wash. (NYPS) 
NY9 Mare Island, Calif. (NYMI) 
NY9-1 Hunters Point, Calif. 
NY10 Pearl Harbor, T. H. (NYPH) 
NY11 Cavite, P. I. 



1215 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 




Parade Ground, Marines — Marines march on the Marine Barracks 
Parade Ground on June 27, 1 973. BOSTS-7637 

oceanographic research ship ( AGOR) — A naval auxiliary which 
performs oceanographic research. Many oceanographic 
research ships owned by the Navy are leased to private 
research institutions for operation, both in support of Navy 
missions and to carry out their own research programs. 

oiler (AO) — A naval auxiliary carrying fuel oil, equivalent to a 
merchant tanker. Originally known as fuel ship. Many 
naval oilers have the capability of providing underway 
replenishment (UNREP) of the fuel oil supply on other 
naval vessels. In 1978, oilers used primarily for point-to- 
point carriage of petroleum products were reclassified as 
transport oilers ( AOT). 

OPNAV — Naval abbreviation for the Office of the Chief of Naval 
Operations. 

ordinary (more properly, in ordinary) — A warship which is out of 
commission and preserved for future reactivation. In the 
20th century, the term was replaced by in reserve. 

ordnance — A collective term for guns, mines, bombs, torpedoes, 
guided missiles, etc. 

out of commission — A warship or naval-manned auxiliary undergo- 
ing conversion or in a reserve fleet. 

out of service — A civilian-manned naval auxiliary or a service craft 
in a reserve fleet. 

outfitting — see fitting out 

overhaul - - The process of inspecting, cleaning, adjusting, and 
repairing a ship and her equipment following a deploy- 
ment. An overhaul is generally the least extensive avail- 
ability, but the term is often applied to a refit as well. 

parade ground - - The area of a military installation intended for the 
gathering and parading of personnel. Usually, but not 
always, grass-covered, and often the location of the 
installation's flagpole. 

park — ( 1 ) In military usage, an area where military vehicles, ord- 
nance, and other equipment is stored and serviced. They 
were often identified by the type of materiel stored, such 
as Anchor Park, Gun Park, and Shot Park. (2) Any unit of 
the National Park System, irregardless of its formal desig- 
nation. 

passed midshipmen — A midshipman who had passed his examina- 
tion for lieutenant but for whom no vacancy existed. Re- 
placed in 1 862 by the rank of ensign. 

pattern — A full-scale model, usually made of wood, used by a 
foundry to make a mold for the casting of metal compo- 
nents. 



pier — A wharf which projects into a harbor, with water and accom- 
modations for berthing vessels on two or more sides of it. 
See also finger pier 

piling — A wood, metal, or concrete pole driven into the bottom of 
a body of water used to support a pier. Pilings along the 
edge of a pier, known as fender piles, serve to protect the 
main body of a pier from damage by vessels. 

pitch house (originally pitch-house) — A facility for the heating of 
pitch for use as caulking for wooden ships. 

plate field (also plate yard) — The area of a navy yard used for the 
outdoor storage of steel plates. 

PMIS — Project Management Information System; a National Park 
Service database used for the authorization and tracking 
of development, construction, and other programs and 
projects not funded out of the appropriations for the regu- 
lar operation of the NPS (ONPS). 

PNF — Project Notification Form; a document required under MEPA 
and used to determine whether or not a proposed project 
requires an EIR/EIS or other special permits. 

PNS/PNSY — Portsmouth Naval Shipyard 

pontoon — (1) A watertight structure (box, barrel, etc.) used to float 
something, often used in salvage work (e.g., salvage pon- 
toon (YSP)). (2) The barge on which a floating crane is 
mounted. 

portal crane — A self-propelled crane mounted on a gantry frame- 
work, traveling on wide-gauge tracks, usually along the 
edges of docks, to facilitate the movement and lifting of 
heavy components and equipment. Low portal cranes 
have a gantry that does not permit passage under them, 
while high portals allow them to pass over low buildings 
and for vehicles to pass under them. Sometimes referred 
to as a gantry crane. 

powerhouse (originally power house) — A facility containing equip- 
ment for the generation of electricity and/or steam for dis- 
tribution to other buildings throughout an industrial facil- 
ity. See also boilerhouse; engine house 

preservation — A treatment for historic properties defined in the 
Secretary's Standards as the act or process of applying 
measures necessary to sustain the existing form, integ- 
rity, and materials of an historic property. 

Production Division — The division within a naval shipyard re- 
sponsible for ship construction and repair, as well as manu- 




Pontoon — The Navy used pontoons for salvage work. Four of the six 
salvage pontoons used to recover the sunken submarine USS S-4 (SS- 
109) are seen forward of the conning tower as the boat is maneuvered 
into Dry Dock 2 on Mar. 19,1928. BOSTS-14138 



- I 216 



Appendix D, Glossary 




Radar — Modern warships carry a large variety of radar antennas on 
their masts. This photograph, taken on Oct. 1, 1958, at the East Jetty of the 
South Boston Annex, shows the equipment mounted on the main mast and 
stack of USS Cassin Young (DD-793). BOSTC-1589 

facturing activities. Incorporated the functions formerly 
assigned to the yard's equivalents of the Bureau of Con- 
struction & Repair, Bureau of Engineering, and Bureau 
ofEquipment. 

propeller (also propellor) — A device for moving a ship through the 
water consisting of radiating blades mounted on a rotat- 
ing shaft, located underwater at the stern of a vessel. Also 
known as a screw. 

public works — ( 1 ) I.e. The construction of buildings, piers, roads, 
utility lines, etc., by a government agency either for its 
own use or for public benefit. (2) u.c. The department 
within a naval facility charged with the construction and 
maintenance of its physical plant. The successor to Yards 
& Docks, Public Works was headed by the Public Works 
Officer (formerly the Civil Engineer) and included such 
shops as Transportation and Power Plant. 

Public Works Officer — see Civil Engineer 

pumphouse (originally pump-house) — A building containing pumps 
used to empty or flood dry docks; fill and empty storage 
tanks; circulate water; or support firefighting services 
within a shipyard. 

PWO — Public Works Office; Public Works Officer 

quarters — Residential units for officers and senior enlisted per- 
sonnel. Quarters could be family quarters or bachelor 
quarters. Bachelor quarters are divided between Bachelor 
Enlisted Quarters (BEQ) and Bachelor Officers Quarters 
(BOQ). Individual quarters on a naval facility arc tradi- 
tionally designated by letters (e.g.. Quarters A). 



quay (pronounced "key") — A solid wharf or structure built of stone 
along the edge of a harbor used for loading and offloading 
of cargo, and embarkation and disembarkation of passen- 
gers. 

radar — ( 1 ) Radio detecting and ranging; a device for determining 
the presence and location of an object by measuring the 
time for the echo of a radio wave to return from it and the 
direction from which it returns. (2) The antennas and 
other equipment used in radar, often mounted on a ship's 
mast. 

radar picket ship ( AGR/YAGR) — A naval auxiliary equipped with 
radar intended to remain on stations in the North Atlantic 
and Northern Pacific to provide early warning of possible 
Soviet air attack on North America. Introduced in the late 
1950s, the radar picket ship was the successor to spe- 
cially-converted radar picket destroyers ( DDR) and ra- 
dar picket escorts ( DER). All such ships were withdrawn 
in the mid- 1 960s as other early warning systems came into 
operation. 

rating -- The designation of an occupational specialty of Navy 
enlisted personnel, generally indicated by a letter code 
(e.g., BM, boatswain's mate; PhM, pharmacist's mate; 
YN, yeoman) used in place of generic petty officer (PO) 
designations. 

razee — (1) n. A wooden sailing warship reduced one class by 
removal of the ship's upper gun deck, particularly a ship- 
of-the-line cut down to a frigate, but also used for frig- 
ates cut down to corvettes (sloops-of-war). (2) v. The 
process of cutting down a warship to a razee. 

reactivation — The process of preparing a ship in a reserve fleet for 
active service. Reactivation can be relatively simple (in- 
volving removal of dehumidification systems amd other 
protective coatings and coverings, as well as outfitting) 
or include a significant refit or conversion. 

rear admiral (RADM) (originally rear-admiral) — see admiral 

Receiving Ship — ( 1 ) A warship, usually outdated technologically 
but structurally sound, moored at a naval base or yard 
and equipped as barracks and classrooms for either new 
recruits or sailors between shipboard assignments. (2) A 
land-based facility serving the same purpose as a receiv- 
ing ship. More commonly known as a Receiving Station 
from World War II onwards. 

Receiving Station — see Receiving Ship 

reconstruction — A treatment for historic properties defined in the 
Secretary's Standards as the act or process of depicting, 
by means of new construction, the form, features, and 
detailing of a non-surviving site, landscape, building, 
structure, or object for the purpose of replicating its ap- 
pearance at a specific period of time and in its historic 
location. 

refit - The process of modernizing a ship to bring the ship up to 
more current standards of performance. A refit is usually 
less extensive than a conversion and does not invoke 
major changes in mission or weaponry. 

rehabilitation — A treatment for historic properties defined in the 
Secretary's Standards as the act or process of making 
possible a compatible use for a property through repair. 



1217 - 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



alterations, and additions while preserving those portions 
or features which convey its historical, cultural, or archi- 
tectural values. When the new use is different from the 
historic use, rehabilitation is often described as adaptive 
reuse (or adaptive use). 

repair — The process of correcting defects in a ship, whether caused 
by normal wear-and-tear or damage from the perils of the 
sea or enemy action. See also overhaul 

repair and berthing barge ( YRB/YRBM) — see barracks 

repair barge — see floating workshop 

repair ship (AR) — A naval auxiliary equipped with shop facilities 
to perform maintenance and repair work on naval vessels 
at sea or at remote bases. Several specialized types of 
repair ships (ARB/ARL/ARV/ARVA/ARVE) were devel- 
oped during World War II, many of which were based on 
or converted from an LST hull. See also tender 

replacement in kind — The replacement of deteriorated features of 
a historic structure with new ones which match the exist- 
ing in material and appearance. 

research vessel (RV; sometimes R/V) — A ship whose primary 
function is hydrographic or oceanographic research. 

reserve fleet — A group of warships or auxiliaries which are out of 
commission and preserved for future reactivation. Infor- 
mally known as "mothball fleets," reserve fleets were ini- 
tially formal units in the Navy, with assigned naval per- 
sonnel (e.g., 1 6th Fleet), but more recently have been de- 
signed Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facilities 
(NISMF) operated under civilian management. 

restoration — A treatment for historic properties defined in the 
Secretary's Standards as the act or process of accurately 
depicting the form, features, and character of a property 
as it appeared at a particular period of time by means of 
the removal of features from other periods in its history 
and reconstruction of missing features from the restora- 
tion period. 

rigger — ( 1 ) A person who manufactures, installs, and maintains 
the rigging of a ship. (2) A person who specializes in the 





Sawmill — Even in the age of steel ships, the Navy Yard needed a large 
sawmill to support its operations, in particular the manufacture of small 
boats. This Oct. 1 949 view shows the ripsaw located in the sawmill wing 
of Building 114. BOSTS-9836 



Sail Loft, Yard — The Navy Yard's Sail Loft in Building 33 is seen in this 
photograph taken around August 1917. Note the suspended yards which 
allowed sails to be hung. BOSTS-9333 

moving of heavy material utilizing hoists, cranes and other 
machinery. 

riggers loft (also rigging loft) — A facility specializing in the manu- 
facture of rigging for ships. 

rigging — Collective term for all the stays, shrouds, halyards, and 
lines that support a vessel's mast and booms and operate 
its movable parts. Standing rigging is fixed, while run- 
ning rigging operates sails, booms, etc. 

RON — Naval abbreviation for squadron, usually used in conjunc- 
tion with the abbreviation of the type of ships assigned to 
it (e.g., DESRON, Destroyer Squadron). See also squad- 
ron 

ropewalk (originally rope walk or rope-walk) — A long, narrow path 
or alley where ropes are made. Originally, most ropewalks 
were simply covered with a roof, but were later enclosed 
in buildings that mirrored their long, narrow nature. 

roundhouse — A building containing tracks, with pits, and other 
equipment for the storage and maintenance of railroad 
locomotives and locomotive cranes. The term derives 
from standard railroad terminology without regard to the 
actual shape of the building. 

sail loft — A facility specializing in the manufacture of sails for 
ships. The sail loft also manufactured other articles made 
from canvas, as well as flags. 

sailing master — see master 

saluting battery — see battery 

salvage ship (ARS) — A naval auxiliary carrying cranes and other 
equipment for the salvage of sunken vessels and aircraft. 

sawmill (originally saw mill; saw-mill) — A facility using mechani- 
cally-powered saws, planers, etc., to cut and form large 
timbers, planks, etc. 

SBA — South Boston Annex 

SCB — Ship Characteristics Board; an organization within the Navy 
Department created at the end of World War II to estab- 
lish the characteristics for both new naval vessels and 
conversions of older ships. Until 1 965, all designs were 
numbered in a single sequence; beginning in FY 1965, 
design numbers were grouped by general types (e.g., SCB- 
200 series, which included destroyers and escort ships). 

schooner — A sailing ship with two or more masts, all of which are 
fore-and-aft ritjged. 



1218 



Appendix D, Glossary 



Service Craft: A Gallery 



SERVICE CRAFT perform a wide variety of duties at navy bases. 
With the exception of tugs, most service craft, also known as 
district craft or yard craft, are simply known by their serial number. 
Many such vessels have had extremely long lives. For example, the 



I i * J 



Berthing Barge — Berthing barges provided living space for sailors in 
shipyards while their vessels were undergoing repairs. This view shows 
Repair, Berthing, and Messing Barge YRBM-26 on Oct. 31, 1970, three 
weeks after delivery to the Navy from her builder, Marinette Marine of 
Marinette, Wise. The Boston Naval Shipyard served as the facility for the 
delivery of naval vessels and craft built on the Great Lakes as well as 
along the northern New England coast. BOSTS-10868 




Floating Dry Dock (YFD) — Floating dry docks provided the ability to 
service ships in locations where permanent dry docks were unavailable. 
During World War II, the Navy acquired numerous wooden dry docks such 
as YFD-24. Capable of lifting ships up to destroyers in size, this was one 
of two floating docks assigned to the South Boston Annex to free up the 
facility's permanent docks for larger vessels. BOSTS-14960 



oldest active service craft on the Naval Vessel Register as of mid- 
2008 is YC-306, completed in 1915. 

This gallery illustrates several of the major types of service 
craft which served the Charlestown Navy Yard through the years. 




mmK 

IrWb-*- 



Crane Ship (AB)/Floating Crane (YD) — Crane Ship No. 1 (AB-1), 
converted from the battleship Kearsarge (BB-5) in 1 920, was one of the 
best-known service craft assigned to the Navy Yard. She spent several 
periods at the yard, the last from 1948 until her sale for scrap in 1955. 
Shortly before her disposal, she is seen berthed with her replacement in 
the yard's inventory, the newly-delivered YD-196. BOSTS-11624 




Floating Pile Driver (YPD) — Floating pile drivers were used in the 
maintenance of the Navy Yard's waterfront facilities. Acquired in 1 942, 
YPD-24 sits at Pier 8 on Lincoln's Birthday, 1 960. BOSTS-14883 




Floating Workshop (YR) — Also known as repair barges, floating work- 
shops supplemented shore-based shops for crews performing work on 
ships. Here, YR-15 is seen alongside USS Whitney (AD-4) on Nov. 3, 
1923. BOSTS-14686 



Medium Harbor Tug (YTM) — The harbor tug Chegodega (YTM-542) is 
seen on Nov. 1 0, 1 972. Navy harbor tugs, used to maneuver ships into and 
out of docks and piers, were also equipped with firefighting equipment, as 
evidenced by the red nozzle forward of the pilot house. BOSTS-10680 



- 1219 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



screw — see propeller 

screw gunboat, etc. — A warship powered by a propeller. 

sea trials — The operation of a newly constructed, modernized, or 
repaired ship in order to determine whether her perfor- 
mance meets contract or specification requirements. See 
also shakedown cruise 

sea wall — A wooden, masonry, or steel structure intended to define 
the limits of a shoreline, usually backed by filled earth. 
Wooden and steel sea walls are sometimes referred to as 
sheet piling, while masonry ones used for docking ships 
are known as quays. 

seaplane tender (AV/AVP) — Anaval auxiliary which provides fa- 
cilities for the maintenance and operation of seaplanes at 
sea. The small seaplane tender ( AVP) was built on a hull 
similar to that of contemporary destroyers. 

SECNAV — Naval abbreviation for the Secretary of the Navy. 

Secretary's Standards — The Secretary of the Interior s Standards 
for the Treatment of Historic Properties (1995); guide- 
lines issued by the Secretary of the Interior under the 
National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) of 1966 for the 
treatment of historic properties. The guidelines identify 
four appropriate treatments: preservation, reconstruction, 
rehabilitation, and restoration. 

Section 4(f) — Section 4(f) of the Department of Transportation Act 
of 1966, which prohibits the use of public parklands for 
highways unless no feasible and prudent alternatives ex- 
isted. 

Section 106 — Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation 
Act (NHPA) of 1966, which requires that the heads of 
federal agencies assess the effect of proposed actions 
(undertakings) on historic properties as part of the plan- 
ning process. Under the current regulations promulgated 
by the ACHP, projects can be found to have either "no 
adverse effect" or an "adverse effect" on historic proper- 
ties. 

Section 110 — Section 110 of the National Historic Preservation 
Act (NHPA) of 1966, which requires that the heads of 




Shears — Resembling an A-frame, shears (or shear legs) were used for 
lifting heavy items using block and tackle prior to the development of mobile 
cranes. This shears was located near the outer end of Dry Dock 1 . 

Burroughs Collection. Bostonian Society 



federal agencies identify historic properties under their 
jurisdiction and nominate them for inclusion on the Na- 
tional Register. 

service craft — Small craft which support activities at a naval facil- 
ity or advance base, including self-propelled craft such as 
tugs, net tenders ( YN ); fuel oil, gasoline, and w ater barges 
(YO/YOG/YW); and seaplane wrecking derricks (YSD). 
The majority of service craft, however, are non-self-pro- 
pelled barges or lighters. With the exception of tugs, 
most service craft have no formal names, being known 
prior to 1 920 by generic designations (e.g., U.S. Navy Coal 
Barge No. 104) and after 1 920 by their hull numbers (e.g., 
U.S. Navy YC-104). Also known as yard craft or district 
craft. 

shakedown cruise — A deployment of a ship primarily to conduct 
sea trials as well as to perform training of her crew in the 
operation of the ship and her weapons and other systems. 

shears (also sheers) — More properly, shear legs; an apparatus 
used to lift heavy weights, consisting of two or more spars 
joined at the top and spread at the base (i.e., an A-frame), 
the tackle being suspended from the top. 

sheet piling — Wood timbers or steel plates driven into the sea 
bottom to form a wall. Sheet piling can be temporary, to 
form a cofferdam, or permanent in the form of a sea wall. 

shell house (originally shell-house) — A facility for the storage of 
explosive shells. 

ship — ( 1 ) Any ocean-going vessel. (2) A ship-rigged, three-masted 
sailing ship. 

ship-of-the-line — A ship-rigged sailing warship having guns on 
three or more decks, intended to form a line with similar 
ships to combat an enemy fleet sailing on a parallel course. 

ship-rigged — A ship with square or rectangular sails mounted on 
yards on two or more masts perpendicular to the ship's 
keel. Also known as square-rigged. 

ship's superintendent — see superintendent 

shipfitter (originally ship-fitter) — A person who forms plates, 
shapes, etc., of ships according to plans, patterns, or 
molds. 

shiphouse (originally ship house or ship-house) — A large wooden 
structure erected over shipbuilding ways to protect a ves- 
sel under construction from the weather. Shiphouses re- 
sembled inverted ship's hulls in structure. 

shipway (also shipways) — The area or structure supporting a ship 
during construction. Traditional shipways (also known 
as building ways or ways) were generally inclined towards 
the water to facilitate launching. 

shipwright — A person who builds and launches wooden vessels 
or does carpentry work in connection with the building 
and launching of steel or iron vessels. 

shipyard — A waterfront industrial facility where ships can be built, 
launched, outfitted, and/or repaired. Shipyards generally 
include administrative offices, industrial shops, laydown 
and storage areas, cranes, dry docks, basins, and piers. 

- The area of the Navy Yard bordered by 3rd St.. 
First and Second Aves., and 4th St., formerly occupied by 
the Gun Park, used in the 20th century for ceremonial ac- 
tivities. It included the yard's Band Stand and Flat: Pole. 



I 220 



Appendix D, Glossary 



DIRECTORY OF SENIOR SUPERVISORS 

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Shop — This reproduction from the 1953 edition of the Annual Publication of the Master Mechanics' and Foremen's Association, Boston Naval 
Shipyard, provides a listing of the various shops within the Boston Naval Shipyard in the post-World War II period together with the names and telephone 
numbers of their masters and brief information about what they encompassed. By this time, the practice of preceding shop numbers by "X-" had been 
discontinued. BNHPRG2.6 



Shipyard Park — The area of the Navy Yard formerly occupied by 
Building 1 95 and previously by the yard 's Recreation Field, 
created as a public park by the BRA. The park houses the 
Massachusetts Korean War Veterans Memorial. 

shop — The basic organizational unit for trades within the shipyard. 
Each shop was designated by a number as well as a name 
(e.g., Shop 02, Transportation; Shop 97, Ropewalk). Shops 
were generally headed by masters (master mechanics). 
Other supervisory levels within shops, in descending or- 
der, were foremen, leadingmen, and quartermen. 

shore establishment — The land-based facilities supporting the 
Navy, including naval air stations, ammunition depots, 
bases, hospitals, shipyards, training stations, etc., as well 
as the offices in the Navy Department in Washington. 

shot — (1) Ammunition, usually solid cast iron balls, used in can- 
non. (2) A unit designating chain length, containing 15 
fathoms (90 feet). 

SHPO — State Historic Preservation Officer; a state official respon- 
sible for review of federal actions as a part of the Section 
106 process and for nominating properties for inclusion 
on the National Register. In Massachusetts, the SHPO is 
also the executive director of the Massachusetts Histori- 
cal Commission (MHC). 

sidewheeler — A steamship propelled by two large paddlewheels 
located on either side of the ship at approximately mid- 
ship. 



slip — The area between two piers, generally used for berthing of 
ships but also associated with facilities such as building 
ways. 

sloop-of-war — A ship-rigged sailing warship having guns on a 
single deck. The largest sloops-of-war were sometimes 
referred to as corvettes. 

small boat — see boat 

smithery — see forge 

sonar — ( 1 ) Sound navigation ranging; a method for detecting and 
locating underwater objects using transmitted and re- 
flected sound waves. (2) The apparatus used in sonar, 
often housed in domes mounted on the bottom of a ship's 
hull. 

spar — Any pole such as a mast, yard, or gaff, used to support or 
extend a sail of a sailing vessel. The most common usage 
of the term is as a synonym for yard. 

sponsor — The individual, traditionally female, chosen to formally 
name a naval vessel. The sponsor participates in the chris- 
tening and launching ceremony. When a ship is named 
for an individual, the sponsor is usually a relative of the 
person being honored. 

squadron — A group of naval vessels under an overall commander. 
In the 19th century, squadrons were the largest opera- 
tional units at sea and were generally known by their sta- 
lions (e.g., North Atlantic Blockading Squadron). In the 
20th century, squadrons were usually administrative 



1221 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 




Sonar, Keel Blocks — Most sonar units were installed in domes on the 
bow of the ship. This view shows the bow dome on USS Edward McDonnell 
(DE-1 043) in Dry Dock 4 at the South Boston Annex on Jan. 9, 1 973. Note 
the concrete keel block in the foreground with its wood "dunnage" at its 
side and the elevated keel blocks under the ship in the background. 

BOSTS-13715 

groupings of similar types of ships subsidiary to a fleet. 
See also RON 

square-rigged — see ship-rigged 

steam box — A facility using steam to soften large timbers so that 
they can be bent to the shapes necessary for their use in 
ship construction and repair. See also timber bending 
mill 

steam frigate — A wooden frigate having steam propulsion. 

steam sloop — A wooden sloop-of-war having steam propulsion. 

steamer — see steamship 

steamship (SS) — A ship propelled by a steam engine. Especially in 
the 19th century, steamships were often referred to as 
steamers. 

stepping the mast — see mast 

store — A storehouse, often preceded by the type of material stored 
in the facility, e.g., cordage store; ordnance store. 

store ship (AF/AFS) (also storeship or stores ship) — A naval 
auxiliary intended to carry and dispense stores (supplies) 
other than ammunition and fuel to ships at sea or remote 
bases. Most Navy store ships had extensive refrigerated 
spaces to protect food supplies. See also supply ship. 

storehouse (originally store house; store-house) — A warehouse 
for the storage of supplies and material. See also general 
storehouse; store 

stores — Supplies and materials required for the operation of naval 
forces, including clothing, provisions, and equipment. 

stricken — A naval vessel removed from the NVR in anticipation of 
disposal by the Navy. Officially, the names and hull num- 
bers of such vessels are prefixed with "ex-," e.g., ex-Cassin 
Young (ex-DD 793). 

Subaru Pier — stvMMT 

submarine (SS) — A warship, originally known as submarine tor- 
pedo boat, capable of operating and attacking from under- 
water using torpedoes. In the post-World War II period, 
submarines were equipped to tire missiles at land targets 



as well (SSBN/SSG). Submarines are traditionally known 
as boats rather than ships. 

submarine rescue ship ( ASR) — A naval auxiliary, similar in con- 
figuration to a salvage ship, equipped to rescue crews of 
sunken submarines. 

submarine tender (AS) — see tender 

substation (also electrical substation ) — A facility equipped with 
switchgear and transformers to regulate and control the 
distribution of electric power. 

superintendent — ( 1 ) Also ship's superintendent; the person w ithin 
a shipyard responsible for the coordination of work on a 
ship by multiple shops or trades. (2) The individual re- 
sponsible for the management of a National Park System 
unit. 

superstructure — That portion of a ship that is above the level of 
the main deck, including deck houses, stacks, masts, etc., 
but not mounts (housings) for ordnance. 

supply ship — Pre- 1920 designation for new construction store 
ship USS Bridge (AF-\). 

support agreement — An agreement between a federal agency own- 
ing a property and a tenant federal agency which defines 
the relationship and the services to be provided to the 
tenant by the host. Used in lieu of a cooperative agree- 
ment for arrangements between the NPS and other federal 
agencies. 

SUPSHIPS — Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion & Repair; 
naval officer assigned to oversee the construction and 
repair of naval vessels at private shipyards. The designa- 
tion is generally followed by the city in which the office is 
located (e.g., SUPSHIPS Quincy). 

surveying ship (AGS) — A naval auxiliary designed to carry out 
hydrographic surveys and oceanographic research in sup- 
port of naval activities. See also oceanographic research 
ship(AGOR) 

systems command — The successor to bureaus within the Navy 
Department, created in 1 966 and reorganized in 1974. Each 
command was responsible for a particular aspect of navai 
activity and is generally referred to by its abbreviation. 
The individual commands include: 



NAVAIR 
NAVFAC 
NAVORD 
NAVSEA 
NAVSHIPS 
NAVSUP 
tank landing ship — 



Naval Air Systems Command 
Naval Facilities Engineering Command 
Naval Ordnance Systems Command 
Naval Sea Systems Command 
Naval Ship Systems Command 
Naval Supply Systems Command 
see LST 



tarring house — A facility forming a part of a ropewalk where fiber 
yam is coated with tar as a preservative treatment. Since 
the closure of the Charlestown Navy Yard, the Tarring 
House has generally been referred to as the Tar House. 

task force — see fleet 

tenant activity — A naval or other entity housed within a naval 
facility which is not subject to the operational or adminis- 
trative control of the facility commander. The relationship 
between the tenant and the host activity is set forth in a 
support agreement. 



1222 - 



Appendix D, Glossary 



Table D-2 
NAVY SHIP TYPE SYMBOLS 



The following list of type symbols for Navy ships is derived from SECNAV 
INSTRUCTION 5030.1 F, "Classification of Naval Ships and Craft," dated 
Sept. 23,1970, the final such instruction issued during the existence of the 
Boston Naval Shipyard. This order was an updating of instructions which 
originated with General Order No. 541 , "Standard Nomenclature for Naval 



Vessels," issued on July 1 7, 1 920. Entries in italics represent type sym- 
bols which no longer existed in 1970. Prior and later symbols may be 
shown where applicable. To conserve space, type symbols which were 
never used and those for minor auxiliary ship types; smaller landing, patrol, 
and mine warfare craft; and service craft have been omitted. 



Warships 
Aircraft Carriers: 

CVA Attack Aircraft Carrier (pre-1 952 = CV; rerated CV, 1975) 

CVAN Attack Aircraft Carrier (nuclear) (rerated CVN, 1975) 

CVB Large Aircraft Carrier (rerated CVA, 1 952) 

CVE Escort Aircraft Carrier (pre-1943 = ACV; pre-1942 = AVG) 

CVHE Escort Helicopter Aircraft Carrier 

CVL Light Aircraft Carrier 

CVS Anti-Submarine Warfare Support Aircraft Carrier 
Surface Combatants: 

BB Battleship 

BM Monitor 

CA Heavy Cruiser (pre-1920 = Armored Cruiser) 

CAG Guided Missile Heavy Cruiser 

CC Battle Cruiser 

CG Guided Missile Cruiser 

CGN Guided Missile Cruiser (nuclear) 

CL Light Cruiser (pre-1920 = Scout Cruiser) 

CLG Guided Missile Light Cruiser 

DD Destroyer 

DDG Guided Missile Destroyer 

DDE Destroyer Escort 

DDK Hunter- Killer Destroyer 

DDR Radar Picket Destroyer 

DL Frigate (pre-1 950 = CLK) 

DLG Guided Missile Frigate (rerated CG, DDG, 1975) 

DLGN Guided Missile Frigate (nuclear) (rerated CGN, 1975) 
Ocean Escorts: 

BDE Escort Vessel (British) 

DE Escort Ship (rerated FF, Frigate, 1975) 

DEG Guided Missile Escort Ship (rerated FFG, 1975) 

DER Radar Picket Escort Ship (rerated FFR, 1975) 
Command Ships: 

CC Command Ship (pre-1 961 = CLC) 
Submarines: 

SS Submarine 

SSBN Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine (nuclear) 

SSG Guided Missile Submarine 

SSK Anti-Submarine Submarine 

SSN Submarine (nuclear) 

SSR Radar Picket Submarine 

Patrol Ships: 

PC Submarine Chaser (173') 

PCE Patrol Escort 

PCER Patrol Rescue Escort 

PE Eagle 

PF Frigate 

PG Patrol Gunboat 

PY Yacht 

SC Submarine Chaser (11 0") 
Amphibious Warfare Ships: 

LCC Amphibious Command Ship (pre-1968 = AGC) 

LFR Inshore Fire Support Ship (pre-1968 = IFS, LSMR) 

LHA Amphibious Assault Ship (General Purpose) 

LKA Amphibious Cargo Ship (pre-1968 = AKA) 

LPA Amphibious Transport (pre-1968 = APA) 

LPD Amphibious Transport Dock 

LPH Amphibious Assault Ship 

LPR Amphibious Transport (Small) (pre-1968 = APD) 

LSD Dock Landing Ship 

LSM Medium Landing Ship 

LST Tank Landing Ship (pre-1942 = ATL) 

LSV Vehicle Landing Ship 



Mine Warfare Ships: 

DMS Minesweeper, Destroyer 

MCS Mine Countermeasures Ship 

MHC Mmehunter Coastal (pre-1 955 = AMCU) 

MMA Auxiliary Minelayer (pre-1 955 = ACM) 

MMC Minelayer, Coastal (pre-1 955 = CMc) 

MMD Minelayer, Fast (pre-1968 = DM) 

MMF Minelayer, Fleet (pre-1 955 = CM) 

MSC Minesweeper, Coastal (Nonmagnetic) (pre-1 955 = AMS) 

MSCO Minesweeper, Coastal (Old) (pre-1 955 = AMS) 

MSF Minesweeper, Fleet (Steel Hull) (pre-1 955 = AM) 

MSO Minesweeper, Ocean (Nonmagnetic) (pre-1 955 = AM) 
Auxiliary Ships: 

AB Crane Ship 

AC Collier 

AD Destroyer Tender 

AE Ammunition Ship 

AF Store Ship 

AFS Combat Store Ship 

AG Miscellaneous 

AGB Icebreaker 

AGDE Escort Research Ship (rerated AGFF, 1975) 

AGM Missile Range Instrumentation Ship 

AGMR Major Communications Relay Ship 

AGOR Oceanographic Research Ship 

AGP Patrol Craft Tender 

AGR Radar Picket Ship (pre-1 958 = YAGR) 

AGS Surveying Ship 

AGSS Auxiliary Submarine 

AH Hospital Ship 

AK Cargo Ship 

AKL Light Cargo Ship 

AKR Vehicle Cargo Ship 

AKS Stores Issue Ship 

AKV Cargo Ship and Aircraft Ferry 

ANL Net Laying Ship (pre-1968 = AN; pre-1 944 = YN) 

AO Oiler 

AOE Fast Combat Support Ship 

AOG Gasoline Tanker 

AOR Replenishment Oiler 

AP Transport 

APB Self-Propelled Barracks Ship 

APc Coastal Transport 

APL Barracks Craft (non-self-propelled) 1 

AR Repair Ship 

ARC Cable Repairing Ship 

ARL Landing Craft Repair Ship 

ARS Salvage Ship 

AS Submarine Tender 

ASR Submarine Rescue Ship 

ATA Auxiliary Ocean Tug 

ATF Fleet Ocean Tug (pre-1 944 = AT) 

A TO Ocean Tug, Old (pre-1 944 = AT) 

ATS Salvage and Rescue Ship 

AV Seaplane Tender 

AVP Small Seaplane Tender 

AVT Auxiliary Aircraft Transport 

AW Distilling Ship 

CVT Training Aircraft Carrier 

CVU Utility Aircraft Carrier 

IX Unclassified Miscellaneous 1 

IXSS Unclassified Miscellaneous Submarine' 



Officially listed under Service Craft 



1223 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



tender — ( 1 ) A naval auxiliary equipped with shops, berthing and 
messing facilities, etc., to provide logistical and repair sup- 
port to particular classes of naval vessels or seaplanes at 
sea or at remote bases. Most tenders are designated by 
the type of vessel they support, e.g., destroyer tender 
(AD); motor torpedo boat tender (AGP); submarine ten- 
der (AS); seaplane tender (AV/AVP). Early tenders were 
often converted from older warships. (2) A U.S. Coast 
Guard vessel used to maintain and support various aids 
to navigation such as buoys, lighthouses, etc. 

timber bending mill — A facility using steam and other equipment 
to bend wood components for a ship. See also steam box 

timber dock (also timber basin) — A wet dock or basin used for the 
storage of timber in water to preserve it. Some timber 
docks used to store finished components such as spars 
were known as mast ponds or spar ponds. 

timber shed — A building generally consisting of a roof supported 
by brick or granite pillars with or without doors between 
the pillars for the storage of timber. 

torpedo — ( 1 ) A self-propelled weapon launched from a submarine 
or surface warship or dropped from an aircraft which moves 
through the water and explodes upon contact with its 
target. Informally known as a "fish." (2) In the 19th cen- 
tury, a mine. 

torpedo boat (TB) — A warship whose main armament was torpe- 
does, intended to attack larger warships. The destroyer 
was originally developed to defend the fleet from attack 
by torpedo boats. In World War II, the Navy developed 
the motor torpedo boat (PT) to perform similar activities. 

training ship (TS) — A ship designed for hands-on training of 
prospective sailors and naval officers in the skills neces- 
sary for the operation of a ship. In addition to sail train- 
ing ships specially built for the purpose, most navies em- 
ploy older warships as training ships. In the late 1 9th and 
early 20th century, the Navy loaned ships to state naval 
militias as training ships. Since World War II, the loan of 
ships to state merchant marine academies has been under 
the auspices of the Maritime Administration. 

transport (AP/APc) — ( 1 ) A naval auxiliary intended to carry mili- 
tary personnel, equivalent to but far less luxurious than a 
civilian passenger liner. An attack transport (APA) was 
a transport equipped with landing craft and intended to 
discharge soldiers and marines onto enemy beaches. A 
high speed transport (APD) was a destroyer or escort 
vessel converted into an attack transport. (2) A U.S. Army 
term to denote both cargo ships and passenger ships. 

treatment — The specific approach used for the preservation, re- 
construction, rehabilitation, or restoration of historic 
properties, governed by the Secretary's Standards. 

truck crane — A self-propelled crane utilizing wheels to travel over 
roadways. 

tug (or tugboat) — A powerful small boat designed tor manipulating 
larger vessels either by pushing or towing. Navy tugs 
were for either district (yard) ( YMT, YT, YTB, YTL, YTM) 
or ocean-going (AT, ATA, ATF, ATO) service. 

type symbol — Under the standard nomenclature system adopted 
by the Navy in July 1920, each ship was assigned an al- 




UNREP — Although underway replenishment is most often thought of in 
terms of refueling at sea, it also encompassed the transfer of ammunition 
and other supplies. Here, USS Cassin Young (DD-793) takes on fresh 
provisions from the storeship USS Aldebaran (AF-1 0) while operating in 
the Mediterranean in July or August 1 959. Robert Norville 

pha-numeric designation. The type symbol denoted the 
class to which a ship belonged; the exact definition of a 
type symbol varied over time (see Table D-2). The prefix 
"T-" precedes type symbols for ships assigned to the 
Military Sealift Command (MSC). 

unclassified miscellaneous (IX) — A Navy designation for older 
vessels and craft which did not fit under any of the formal 
ship classification categories, including historic relics such 
as USS Constitution (IX-2 1 ), naval militia training ships, 
etc. The IX symbol was first used in the Navy file manual 
in the 1 920s and was converted to a formal type symbol in 
1941. 

undock — To bring a ship away from a wharf or pier or out of a dry 
dock. 

UNREP — Underway replenishment; the transfer at sea of ammuni- 
tion, fuel, and supplies from naval auxiliaries to combatant 
ships to allow them to remain at sea for extended periods. 

USA — United States Army. 

USAF — United States Air Force. 

USAHS — U.S. Army Hospital Ship; the designation used before 
the name of Army-owned or bareboat chartered hospital 
ships. 

USAT - - U.S. Army Transport; the designation used before the 
name of Army-owned or bareboat chartered freighters or 
passenger ships. Most seagoing Army vessels were trans- 
ferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) 
(now MSC) in 1950. 

USAV — U.S. Army Vessel; the designation used before the name of 
Army watercraft other than transports or hospital ships. 

USCG — United States Coast Guard; military service established in 
1915 through the merger of the Revenue Cutter Service 
and the Lifesaving Service. The U.S. Lighthouse Service 
(USLHS) was absorbed by the Coast Guard in 1938. Origi- 
nally under the Treasury Department and then the De- 
partment of Transportation, the Coast Guard is now under 
the Department of Homeland Security. During both World 
War I and World War II. the Coast Guard was transferred 
to and operated under the Navy. 



1224 - 



Appendix D, Glossary 



The Yardbirds 



Many Happy Returns 




f > H*W & KT* DAY ( 
TO EVERYBODY/ J 




The Yardbirds 



Maintain the Schedule 




77>e Yard BW 



No Known Cure! 



.•• ream 










fe*t* -ft i *i.>.v. ! T~ : V^-*. 



77>e Yard Bird 



Last Man To Get The "Word' 



will" >i*b muiw. I Cm rAiMIHO ! 

.-(•St SHiltLrW/ , 



aow,' T-- 

3tlM MK>itl"itLT 

CYt 9THNH i :t4*i»c£ 
<f~ 







Yardbird — The term "yardbird" was used by Navy Yard employees to describe themselves. In the 1950s, the Boston Naval Shipyard News ran a 
series of comic strips drawn by artist Patsy Napoli under the titles "The Yardbirds" and "The Yard Bird" to use humor to celebrate holidays and to promote, 
among other things, good work practices, job safety, blood donation and charitable giving, and the beneficial suggestions program. These four strips are, 
from top to bottom, taken from the News issues of Aug. 26, 1 955; Sept. 9, 1 955; June 29, 1 956; and Dec. 7, 1 956. BOSTS- 13352 



1225 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



USDI — U.S. Department of the Interior. See also DOI 

USMC — United States Marine Corps 

USN — United States Navy 

USNR — United States Navy Reserve 

USNS — United States Naval Ship; prefix attached to names of 
naval owned or bareboat chartered ships manned by civil- 
ian crews under the auspices of the Military Sealift Com- 
mand (MSC). 

USRC — United States Revenue Cutter; designation for ships of 
the Revenue Cutter Service, which became part of the 
U.S. Coast Guard in 1915. 

USS — United States Ship; prefix attached to names of United States 
naval vessels in commission, although informally utilized 
as a prefix for all naval ship names. The designation was 
formalized by executive order in 1 907. Previously, ships 
were often designated by their type, e.g., U.S.F. (United 
States Frigate). 

vehicle cargo ship (AKR) — see cargo ship 

vice admiral (VADM) (originally vice-admiral) — see admiral 

visitor center — A facility in a national park which provides orienta- 
tion information to visitors. In addition to information 
desks, visitor centers often include rest rooms, exhibits 
and theaters, and sales outlets (usually operated by a 
cooperating association). 

warrant officer — An officer, senior to all chief petty officers but 
junior to an ensign, who derives his/her authority from a 
warrant issued by the Secretary of the Navy rather than a 
presidential commission. In the 1 9th century, warrant of- 
ficers were often identified by their specific dutes, such as 
sailing master 

warship — A government-owned ship operated by a navy and 
equipped with guns, guided missiles, or other weapons 
for defensive or offensive military operations. 

water closet (also water-closet) — A toilet; sometimes used in place 
of head or latrine. 

waterfront office — A building located along the waterfront of a 
naval shipyard used to control the movement of vessels 
into and from the yard. 

ways — see shipway 

wet dock — A basin used for the storage of ships or materials such 
as timber. 

wharf (pi. wharves) — A projecting platform of timber, stone, or 
other material which extends into water deep enough for 
vessels to be accommodated alongside for loading or un- 
loading. See also marginal wharf; pier; quay 

wire rope — Rope made from twisted strands of metal wire rather 
than from twisted strands of fiber yarn. 




Yeoman(F) — During World War I, women were enlisted in the Naval 
Reserve as clerical workers at shore establishments to free male sailors 
for other duties. This portrait of Yeoman(F) Marie Breslin was taken on 
Sept. 14,1917. Bettmann Archive/Corbis 

wireless — Early term used for radio. 

XO — Executive officer; the second-ranking officer on a ship, gen- 
erally responsible for shipboard administration. In the 
1 9th century, the position of executive officer in navy yards 
evolved into the position of Captain of the Yard. Most 
contemporary shore establishments do not have execu- 
tive officers, the XO's primary duties being performed by 
an administrative officer. 

Y & D — Yards & Docks; either the Bureau of Yards & Docks in 
Washington or its equivalent organization in navy yards, 
assigned the task of building and maintaining shore es- 
tablishments. Within shipyards. Yards & Docks became 
Public Works in the 20th century. 

yard — ( 1 ) A slender spar tapered towards each end attached hori- 
zontally at or near its center to a mast used for supporting 
square sails. (2) An informal designation for a navy yard 
or shipyard. 

yard craft — see service craft 

Yard's End — The designation used by the BRA to identify parcels 
in the New Development Area of the Navy Yard east of 
16th St. and Dry Dock 5; also known as Pier 1 1 . 

yardbird — An informal term referring to an employee of the Navy 
Yard. 

yeoman(F) (also yeomanette) — Rating designation for women en- 
listed in the Naval Reserve during World War I to perform 
clerical duties at shore establishments. Many yeomen(F) 
were retained as civilian employees after the war. 



1226 



Appendix E 

Bibliography 



THE FOLLOWING BIBLIOGRAPHY includes official docu- 
ments, research reports, and secondary sources consulted 
in the preparation of this report. It excludes primary sources 
discussed in Appendix C, as well as the finding aids to them. Also 
omitted are National Park Service manuals and technical publica- 
tions relating to historic preservation. For items which are avail- 
able through the National Park Service's Technical Information 
Center (TIC), the document number is provided. While not all 
reports have yet been included in the central depository at the NPS 
Denver Service Center, they are available in the Division of Cul- 
tural Resources of Boston National Historical Park. Documents 
available in digital form are indicated by a PDF symbol ("B). 

Only the most significant web sites and web-based documents 
cited are listed here. It should be noted that while web addresses 
were valid at the time they were accessed, the Internet is a fluid 
institution and addresses may change or items may be removed 
from it. In many cases where a single document is listed, a physi- 
cal copy has been created for inclusion in the project file for this 
study. 

Individual articles in newspapers and most general periodi- 
cals (both print and on-line), including the Boston Naval Ship- 
yard News and The Broadside/Boston National Historical Park, 
are not listed separately. 

Official Documents, Reports, Studies 

ABB Environmental Services. Alternatives Evaluation Report. Pier #2 
Sediments, Boston Navy Yard. Feb. 1994. TIC 457/D66. 18 

— . Plan to Address Sediment Contaminants, National Park 
Service, Charlestown Navy Yard, Charlestown, Massachusetts. May 
1994. TIC 457/D90. 18 

Alar Corp. Relocation of Historic Wall, Boston National Historical Park, 
Boston, Massachusetts: Technical Proposal. RFP-NARO- 1-0002. 
Rev. Mar. 11. 1981. TIC 457/D6913A. 

Albee, Peggy A. The Commandant's House: Historic Structure Report, 
Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston National Historical Park. Boston, 
Massachusetts. Draft. Boston: Cultural Resources Center, North 
Atlantic Region. 1990. TIC 457/D6314. 

Alonzo B. Reed, Inc. Specification, National Naval Park Utilities Sup- 
port, Boston Naval Shipyard. Boston, Massachusetts. June 6, 1974. 
TIC 457/D6289. 

Anderson, Nain E., Peter Thorbahn, and Neill DePaoli. Preliminary Ar- 
chaeological Investigation of Gate 4-106. Charlestown Navy Yard, 
Charlestown. Massachusetts. Jan. 1979. Providence, R.I.: Public 
Archaeological Laboratory, 1979. TIC 457/D6088. 

Archetype Architecture. Historic Pavement Study. Charlestown Navy Yard, 
Charlestown. MA. Sept. 1. 1995. TIC 457/D113. 18 

. et al. Master Lighting Plan & Guidelines. Charlestown 

Navy Yard, Boston National Historical Park, Charlestown, MA. 
Feb! 3, 1997. TIC 457/D6275. 



— . Notice of Intent: Repaving & Site Improvements. 
Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston National Historical Park. 
Charlestown, MA. May 1998. TIC 457/D6374. 

Banister, Jennifer Bonner, and Suzanne G. Chereau. Archeological In- 
vestigations, Marine Barracks, Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston 
National Historical Park. Boston (Charlestown). Massachusetts. 
PAL Report 1787.01. Feb. 2006. Pawtucket, R.I.: PAL, 2006. TIC 
457/D6356. 

Bargmann Hendrie + Archetype. Marine Barracks Window Renovation 
Phase: Compliance Report. Sept. 5, 2005. TIC 457/D6375. 

— , and Techmark Security Integration. Design Recommenda- 
tions for Charlestown Navy Yard CCTV. Rev. May 2003. TIC 457/ 
D6371. 

Barton, Andrew, et al. Historic Structure Report: Building 28 and Elec- 
trical Substation. Building 22. Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston 
National Historical Park, Boston, Massachusetts. 2 vols. Den- 
ver: Denver Service Center, 1989. TIC 457/D70. 18 

Basilica Associates. Development Proposal. Charlestown Navy Yard 
Buildings 75 & 106. Oct. 19, 1984. TIC 457/D6404. B 

Bawden, Garth, Randall Moir, and C.C. Lamberg-Karlovsky. Final Re- 
port. Phase II Archaeological Investigation of Chelsea- Water Street 
Connector Project, Charlestown. Massachusetts. ICA 103. Cam- 
bridge, Mass.: Institute for Conservation Archeology, 1979. TIC 
457/D6049. 

Bearss, Edwin C. Charlestown Navy Yard, 1800-1842. 2 vols. Denver: 
National Park Service, 1984. TIC 457/D26. 18 

— , et al. Historic Structure Report. Building 198. Charlestown 
Navy Yard. Boston National Historical Park. Massachusetts. Den- 
ver:' Denver Service Center, 1982. TIC 457/D1888. 18 

— , et al. Historic Structure Report, Historical, Archeological, 
and Architectural Data Sections: Building 204. Garage and Trans- 
portation Office, Charlestown Naval Shipyard, Charlestown, Mas- 
sachusetts, Boston National Historical Park. Draft. Denver: Den- 
ver Service Center, 1979. TIC 457/D13. 18 

Black, Frederick R. Charlestown Navy Yard. 1890-1973. Cultural Re- 
sources Management Study No. 20. 2 vols. Boston: Boston Na- 
tional Historical Park. 1988. TIC 457/D6162A. 18 

— , and Edwin C. Bearss. The Charlestown Navy Yard, 1842- 
1890. Boston: National Park Service, 1993. TIC 457/D6307. 

Booz, Allen & Hamilton. Engineering Survey of Boston Naval Shipyard. 
Aug. 23, 1974. TIC 457/D6344. 

Boston. Mayor's Office of Commerce & Manpower. Interim Reuse Plan 
for the Boston Naval Complex. Mar. 19. 1974. TIC 457/D6352. 
— . - — . Preliminary Data/Boston Naval Shipyi iitf & 

South Boston Naval Annex. Boston: City of Boston, 1973. TIC 
457/D6159. 

Boston. Office of the Mayor. Charlestown Naval Shipyard Urban De\el 
opment Action Grant Jan. 1978. TIC 457/D6272. 18 

Boston Investment & Development Co. The Anchor Building: Develop 
merit Proposal for Building 108. Charlestown Navy Yard. Sept. 
27. 1985. TIC 457/D6387. 18 



- 1227 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Boston Landmarks Commission. The Ropewalk. June 7, 1988. TIC 457/ 
D6373A. 
"Report to the Boston Landmark Commission on the potential designa- 
tion of the Ropewalk Building as a Landmark Under Chapter 772 of the 
Actsofl976." 
Boston National Historic Sites Commission. Final Report of the Boston 
National Historic Sites Commission: Letter From the Secretary of 
the Interior Transmitting the Final Report of the Boston National 
Historic Sites Commission Pertaining in Particular to Major Prob- 
lems of Historic Preservation in the Municipality of Boston. House 
Doc. No. 107, 87th Cong., 1st sess. Washington: U.S. Govt. Print- 
ing Office, 1961. 
Boston National Historical Park. Final Revised General Management 
Plan/Volume II, Boston National Historical Park, Charlesto wn Na vy 
Yard. Boston: Boston National Historical Park, 1987. TIC 457/ 
D6175A. m 

— . Scope of Collection Statement, Boston National Historical 
Mar. 1995. TIC 457/D6145. 



. Building 34. Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. May 

20, 1977. TIC457/D6016. 

— . Building 36. Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. 
1977. TIC 457/D6017. 

-. Building 38. Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. 
1977. TIC 457/D6018. 



20 



20 



May 
May 
May 



— . Building 39. Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. 
20, 1977. TIC 457/D6019. 

— . Building 75. Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. May 
20, 1977. TIC457/D6021. 

. Building 79. Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. May 

20, 1977. TIC 457/D6022. 



20, 



— . Building 96, Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. May 
1977. TIC 457/D6023. 



— . Building 106. Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. May 
20. 1977. TIC 457/D6024. 

— . Building 107, Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. May 
20, 1977. TIC 457/D6025. 
a Concession Contract Will Be Negotiated for the Operation of a . Building 114, Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. May 



Park. 



-. Statement of Requirements (SOR) (Fact Sheet) Under Which 



Fast Service Restaurant at Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston Na 
tional Historical Park. July 9, 1987. TIC 457/D7100. 

— . Statement of Requirements (SOR) (Fact Sheet) Under Which 
a Concession Contract Will Be Negotiated for the Operation of a 
Food Service Facility at Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston National 
Historical Park. Apr. 25, 1988. TIC 457/D7100A. 

Boston Naval Shipyard. Industrial Relations Dept. Employee Services 
Division. Family Album of Boston Naval Shipyard. [Boston], 1951. 

Boston Redevelopment Authority. Application for Federal Assistance 
(For Construction Program) Under Title I of the Grant and Loan 
for Public Works and Development Facilities Program (Catalog 
No. 11.300) for Boston Naval Shipyard/Charlestown Submitted to 
Economic Development Administration, U.S. Department of Com- 
merce. Feb. 1976. TIC 457/D6110. 

— . Application for Transfer of 19. 6 Acres of the Boston Naval 



20, 1977. TIC 457/D6027. 



20 



20 



20 



— . Building 120. Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. May 

1977. TIC 457/D6028. 

— . Building 149, Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. May 

1977. TIC 457/D6029. 

— . Building 199. Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. May 

1977. TIC457/D6031. 

— . Building 266. Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. May 
20. 1977. TIC 457/D6033. 

— . Building PRedeveloper's Kit. Draft. Dec. 1990. TIC 457/ 
D6277. 

— . Building PI 08. Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. 
May 20. 1977. TIC 457/D6026. 

— . Buildings 62. 96, 105, 108: Summary of Proposals. Nov. 
1985. TIC 457/D129. "S 



Shipyard at Charlestown to the Boston Redevelopment Authority 

for Public Park and Recreation Purposes under PL. 91-485 Sub- -• Charlestown Naval Shipyard Planning Data Package. Aug. 

mitted to U.S. Bureau of Outdoor Recreation. Dec. 1975. TIC 1975. TIC 457/D6378. 

457/D6123. . The Charlestown Navy Yard. [Boston: Boston Redevelop- 

-. Application for Transfer of 29.8 Acres of the Boston Naval ment Authority, 1976]. TIC 457/D6293. 18 

Shipyard at Charlestown to the Boston Redevelopment Authority — . Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston: Boston Redevelopment 

for Historic Monument Purposes (40 U.S.C 484(k)(3)) Submitted Authority, 1980. TIC 457/D6293A. 

to General Services Administration. Feb. 1976. TIC 457/D9. _ Charlestown Navy Yard. Aug. 1985. TIC 457/D6285. 

Application for Transfer of 29.8 Acres of the Boston Naval Charlestown Navy Yard: A Comprehensive Update. Dec. 

1994. TIC 457/D6284A. 



Shipyard at Charlestown to the Boston Redevelopment Authority 

for Historic Monument Purposes (40 U.S.C. 484 (k) (3)) Submitted ^, , 

„ . _ . , . " . ,„„ L;i/j ___._. • Charlestown Na\y Yard: Framework tor Discussion 

to General Services Administration. Apr. 1976. TIC 457/D9A 



Draft. 

Apr. 1987. TIC 457/D6274. 

Application for Transfer of 30.9 Acres of the Boston Naval n , , . ,, u , ,, , n , f . ,, ,. c , 

y „, , . „ „ , ... . Charlestown Navy Yard: Master Plan for the rams End. 



Shipyard at Charlestown to the Boston Redevelopment Authority 
for Historic Monument Purposes (40 U.S.C. 484 (k) (3)) Submitted 
to General Services Administration. July 25, 1977. TIC 457/D9B. 

— . Biennial & Status Report, Charlestown Naval Shipyard, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 1990. TIC 457/D6370. 

— . Biomedical Research Center: Buildings B & C. Charlestown 
Navy Yard: Draft Environmental Impact Report. EOEA #8883, 
Apr. 15, 1992. TIC 457/D6361. 

— . Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown: Plan & Develop- 
ment Program. Oct. 1975." TIC 457/D6074. 

— . Boston Naval Shipvard/Charlestown: Planning andDevel 
opment Program. Dec. 1975. TIC 457/D6074A. 

— . Building 33. Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. May 
20, 1977. TIC 457/D6015. 



Jan. 1990. TIC 457/D6290C. IB 

— . Charlestown Na\y Yard: Master Plan for the Yard's End. 
Mar. 1990. TIC 457/D6290A. 18 

— . Charlestown Navy Yard: Master Plan for the Yard's End. 
Oct. 1990. TIC 457/D6290B. 

— . Charlestown Navy Yard: Master Plan for the Yard's End: 
Community Comments. Mar. 1990. TIC 457/D6279. 

— . Charlestown Navy Yard: Master Plan for Yard's End: A 
Framework for Discussion. Jan. 1990. TIC 457/D6290. 

— . Charlestown Navv Yard Master Plan Executive Summary. 
May 10, 1988. TIC 457/D6280. 18 

— . Charlestown Navy Yard Pier Management Plan. Apr. 19, 
1992. TIC 457/D6273. 



- 1228- 



Appendix E, Bibliography 

— . Charlestown Navy Yard Public Access/Open Space Plan: A 
Framework for Discussion. Feb. 1990. TIC 457/D6283. 18 

— . Charlestown Navy Yard Redevelopment: Final Supplemen- 
tal Environmental Impact Report. 2 vols. EOEA #02383, Sept. 3. 
1991. TIC 457/D6291A. 18 

. Charlestown Navy Yard Update 1994. 1994. TIC 457/ 

D6284. 

— . Charlestown Navy Yard Urban Renewal Plan Amendment: 
Addendum to Final Environmental Impact Report. EOEA #02383, 
Jan. 1978. TIC 457/6287A. 

— . Charlestown Navy Yard Urban Renewal Plan Amendment: 
Final Environmental Impact Report. EOEA #02383. Jan. 31. 1977. 
TIC 457/D6287. 18 

— . Design Guidelines: Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. 
[1978?]. TIC 457/D6040A. 18 

— . Design Guidelines. New Development Area. Boston Naval 
Shipyard at Charlestown. June 1978. TIC 457/D6040. 18 

— . Design/Development Guidelines. Buildings 62, 96. 105 and 
108. Aug. 1985. TIC 457/D6189. 18 

— . Design/Development Guidelines, Buildings 75, 105. 106. 
114, 266/Parcel 6 & 7 Sep. 1984. TIC 457/D6189A. 18 

— . A Development Proposal for the Charlestown Navy Yard. 
n.d. [ca. 1971]. TIC 457/D6001B. 
. Double Interpretive Loop Plan, Charlestown Naval Ship- 
yard. Boston. Massachusetts. Draft. 1991. TIC 457/D6292. 

— . Harborpark 1986 Update: The Charlestown Navy Yard. 
1986. TIC 457/D6354. 18 

— . Harborpark Plan: City of Boston Municipal Harbor Plan. 
Oct. 1990. TIC 457/D6276. 18 
. The John F. Kennedy Museum. Charlestown Naval Ship- 
yard/A Proposal. [1975]. TIC 457/D6282. 

— . The John F. Kennedy Museum, Charlestown Naval Ship- 
yard/A Proposal. Nov. 15, 1975. TIC 457/D6282A. 

— . The Navy Yard. Boston: Boston Redevelopment Authority, 
1986. TIC 457/D6293B. 18 

— . Parcel 7. Charlestown Navy Yard, Request for Proposals. 
May 1990. TIC 457/D6368. 

. A Proposal for a National Historic Park & Naval Museum, 

Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston. Massachusetts. Boston: Boston 
Redevelopment Authority, 1973. TIC 457/D6001C. 

. Proposed Municipal Harbor Plan, Minor Geographic 

Amendment, Charlestown Navy Yard/Building 114. June 1999. TIC 
457/D6281. 

— . South Boston Waterfront District Municipal Harbor Plan. 
Draft. Mar. 2000. TIC 457/D6286. 

. Specifications: Demolition and Site Clearance Contract 

No. 2. [ca. July 1978]. TIC 457/D6907. 
. Specifications: Sewer, Drain and Water Construction Con- 
tract No. 1. 1978. TIC 457/D6905. 

. Specifications: Site Preparation Contract No. 1. Phase I 

Redevelopment. July 1980. TIC 457/6903. 

. Water- Dependent Use Management Plan. Charlestown Navy 

Yard. May 2007. TIC 457/D6349. 18 

— . Waterfront Activation Network Plan for the Charlestown 
Navy Yard. 2007. TIC 457/D6350A. 18 

— . Capital Construction Dept. Marine Industrial Park. Sept. 
2002. TIC 457/D6343. 

— . Neighborhood Planning Dept. Buildings in the Historic 
Monument Area & New Development Area of the Charlestown Na- 
val Shipyard. [1977]. TIC 457/D5. 18 



— . Planning Dept. Charlestown Naval Shipyard Historic Park 
Proposal (revised). Charlestown Naval Shipyard Re-Use Study, 
Report III: Historic Park Proposal. Aug. 1971 [1975 revision]. TIC 
457/D6001A. 

— . - — . Charlestown Naval Shipyard Re- Use Study, 

Report I: Analysis of the Site and Framework for the Development 
of the Shipyard. Nov. 1970. TIC 457/D6000. 

— , and Courageous Sailing Center. The Courageous Sailing 
Center. Jan. 27, 1987. TIC 457/D6402. 18 

Boston Shipbuilding Corp. Boston Shipbuilding Corporation, Boston, 
Mass.: Confidential Information Book. July 1, 1974. TIC 457/ 
D6347. 

Boston Transportation Planning Review. Harbor Crossing Draft Envi- 
ronmental Impact Statement, Preliminary Location Report, Pro- 
gram Package Evaluation Report. Sept. 1972. 

Brady, Mary Jane. Historic Structure Report. Architectural Data Sec- 
tion. Pier 1 and 2. Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston National His- 
torical Park. Massachusetts: Volume I, Historical Background. 
Denver: Denver Service Center, 1982. TIC 457/D1842. 18 

— , and Christopher J. Foster, Inc. Historic Structure Report. 
Dry Dock 1. Charlestown Navy Yard: Architectural Data. Boston 
National Historical Park, Massachusetts. Draft. Denver: Denver 
Service Center, 1980. TIC 457/D6059. 18 

— , and Crandall Dry Dock Engineers, Inc. Historic Structure 
Report. Marine Railway No. 11. Architectural Data Section. 
Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston National Historical Park, Boston, 
Massachusetts. Denver: Denver Service Center, National Park Ser- 
vice, 1982. TIC 457/D1879. 18 

Bricklayers & Laborers Non-Profit Housing Corp. Elderly Housing Pro- 
posal. Building 104 in the Charlestown Navy Yard. Apr. 30, 1991. 
TIC 457/D6405. 18 

Brockway. Lucinda A., and Patrice A. Todisco. Charlestown Navy Yard 
Historic Grounds Management Report. [Boston) : Boston National 
Historical Park, 1985. TIC 457/D6157. 

Butowsky, Harry A. Warships Associated With World War II in the Pa- 
cific: National Historic Landmark Theme Study. Washington: Na- 
tional Park Service. 1985. TIC 457/D6201. 18 

Carden, Marie L., and Lawrence A. Sorli. Ropewalk and Tar House (Build- 
ings 58 and 60): Historic Structure Report, Charlestown Navy Yard, 
Boston National Historical Park. Boston, Massachusetts. Rev. by 
Louis P. Hutchins. 2 vols. 1999. TIC 457/D6301A. 

Carlson, Stephen P. Captains' Row, Charlestown Navy Yard, Historical 
Summary. Rev. May 1992. TIC 457/D6325A. 

— . Completion Report. 1443-CX1 720-99-003. Repaving of 
Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston National Historical Park. Dec. 7, 
2004. TIC 457/D6362. 18 

— . Ships Built at the Charlestown Navy Yard. Draft. Boston: 
Boston National Historical Park, 1992. TIC 457/D6304. 

Carolan, Jane. Building 105/The Chain Forge, Charlestown Navy Yard. 
Rev. draft. Dec. 2003. TIC 457/D6312. 

Carroll, Orville W. Completion Report: Adaptive Use and Renovations 
to Building 28. Charlestown Navy Yard. Charlestown. Massachu- 
setts. Feb. 1980. TIC 457/D6107. 

. Historic Structure Report. Architectural Data Section, 
Building 10. Charlestown Navy Yard. Mass. Draft. Jan. 30, 1989. 
TIC 457/D6310. 

Childs Bertman Tseckares & Casendino. Conceptual Study. Museum of 
New England Life at the Ropewalk. Rev. Apr. 1989. TIC 457/ 
D6376A. 



1229 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 

Childs Engineering Corp. Notice of Intent, USS Constitution Finger Pier — , et al. Basic Design Report for a Portion of Interstate Route 

and Platform Repairs. Charlestown Navy Yard, Charlestown, Mas- 95. Boston (Charlestown). Boston. 1965. TIC 457/D6108. 

sachusetts. Mar. 7, 2007. TIC 457/D6359. Fisher Charles E. Aluminum Replacements for Steel Industrial Sash. 

Conlin, David L., ed. USS Housatonic Site Assessment. Submerged Re- Preservation Tech Notes. Windows no. 12. Washington: National 

sources Center Professional Papers No. 19. 2005. TIC 999/ Park Service, 1986. 

D175 3- * Fort Point Associates. Building 39A. Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston. 

Also issued by Naval Historical Center as Underwater Archaeology Massachusetts: Project Notification Form. Dec. 10 2001 TIC 

Branch Papers No. 4. 457/D6363. 

Craig. Bruce. Building 109 Historical Survey Section. Apr. 1978. TIC _ Harborvjew Poinl charlestown Navy. Yard. Boston. Mas- 

457/D6038. sachusetts: Notice of Project Change. Dec. 17. 2001. TIC 457/ 

Cumberland, Donald R., Jr. Collection Storage Plan, Charlestown Navy D6366. 

Yard, Boston National Historical Park. Aug. 1988. TIC 457/D6187. _ Harborview PoinL Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston. Mas- 
Denver Service Center. Assessment of Alternatives. Charlestown Navy sachusetts: Project Notification Form. Dec. 17,2001. TIC 457/ 
Yard. Boston National Historical Park. Apr. 1979. TIC 457/D6. D6367. 

Boundary Enlargement Report. Charlestown Navy Yard. _. Harborview Point. Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston. Mas- 
Boston National Historical Park. Dec. 1978. TIC 457/D1302A. sachusetts: Supplemental Environmental Impact Report. Draft 

— . Environmental Assessment of Management Alternatives for Project Impact Report. 2 vols. Aug. 15, 2002. TIC 457/D6364. 

Boston National Historical Park. Nov. 1976. TIC 457/D1133A. _. The Residences at Pier 5. Charlestown Navy Yard: Ex- 

Desmond, Childs & Adams, Inc. Appraisal. Boston Naval Shipyard, panded Environmental Notification Form. Project Notification 

Charlestown. Boston. Massachusetts. June 15. 1974. 2 vols. TIC Form. May 17, 2004. Boston: Fort Point Associates, 2004. TIC 

457/D6390. 457/D6351. 18 

— . Appraisal, Boston Naval Shipyard, South Boston Annex. — . The Residences at Pier 5. Charlestown Navy Yard: Project 

Boston, Massachusetts. May 15, 1974. TIC 457/D6391. Update. May 25, 2006. Boston: Fort Point Associates, 2006. TIC 

Dessauer, Peter F. Completion Report. Rehabilitation of Pier II, Phase 457/D6351A. t 

III, Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston National Historical Park. Oct. . Yard's End Research Center, Charlestown Na\y Yard Par- 

1987. TIC 457/D6184. B eel 6/7. Apr. 30, 2003. TIC 457/D6372. 

Dudley, William S., ed. The Naval War of 1812: A Documentary His- Foster Wheeler Environmental Corp., et al. California Historic Military 

tory: Volume I, 1812. Washington: Naval Historical Center, 1985. Buildings and Structures Inventory. 4 vols. Sacramento: U.S. Army 

Economic Development & Industrial Corporation of Boston. Economic Cor P s of Engineers, Sacramento District. 2000. t 

Development Plan for the Boston Marine Industrial Park, For- Fox. Robert. Completion Report. Reroofing of the Commandant's House. 

merly the South Boston Naval Annex. July 1976. TIC 457/ Boston National Historical Park. Charlestown Navy Yard. Jan. 

D6382. 1B 1991. TIC 457/D6278. 

— . First Amendment to the Economic Development Plan for Friends of the Museum of Printing. The Friends of the Museum ofPrint- 

the Boston Marine Industrial Park. Jan. 1980. ing. Inc.. Invite You to Join the Founders Club to Create a New 

-. Marine Industrial Park Master Plan Final Environmental Museum. The National Museum of Printing. Boston, [ca. 1 993) . 

Impact Report. EOEA #08161. Dec. 1999. Goodwin, Proctor & Hoar. Historic Preservation Certification Applica- 

-, in cooperation with O'Connell Seafood Co. Boston Marine tion - Boston Naval Shipyard-Building 40-42 Complex. Part I. 

Industrial Park O'Connell Seafood Company. Inc. Project: A Res- Evaluation of Significance. Dec. 16. 1977. TIC 457/D6388. 

toration of Boston Harbor Pier Facility for the Fishing Industry . . Part II Certification of Proposed Rehabili- 

Urban Development Action Grant Application to the U.S. Depart- tation. Jan. 5, 1978. TIC 457/D6388. 

ment of Housing and Urban Development. Jan. 31, 1980. TIC Goody. Clancy & Associates. Building 24 Historic Structures Report. 

457/D6383. 18 Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston National Historical Park. Oct. 

Einhorn Yaffe Prescott. Historic Structure Report for Building 125 (Paint 2003. TIC 457/D139. 18 

Shop). Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston National Historical Park. Gow, Charles R. Completion Report of the Constructing Quartermaster 

Boston. Massachusetts. Boston: Einhorn Yaffe Prescott, 2003. TIC of the Boston Army Supply Base. June 28. 1919. 

457/D6326. 1 Graffam, Gray, and C.C. Lamberg-Karlovsky. Final Report. Scale-Recti- 

Environmental Waste Technology, Inc. Tank Closure Reports. Charlestown fj e d Photographic Documentation of the Historic Walls at the 

Navy Yard, Charlestown. Massachusetts. DACA33-93-0070. Charlestown Naval Yard: A Record Made Prior to the Construc- 

|1995] TIC 457/D6311. tion of the Chelsea-Water Streets Connector. Charlestown. Massa- 

Epsilon Associates. Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital: Draft Environ chusetts. ICA 103. Dec. 1980. Cambridge, Mass.: Institute for 

mental Impact Report/Draft Project Impact Report. EOEA # 1 386 1 . Conservation Archeology. 1 980. TIC 457/D6080. 

Mar. 27. 2009. TIC 457/D6381. 18 Guditz, Kenneth, et al. Historic Structure Report: Muster House/Build- 

Evans. G. Rodger. Historic Structure Report. Marine Barracks (Bldg. I), ing 31. Boston Naval Shipyard. Charlestown. MA. 1991. TIC 

Charlestown Navy Yard: Architectural Data. Boston National His 457/D6 113. 

torical Park. Charlestown. Massachusetts. Draft. Denver: Den- Guitian. Alane. and Merrill A. Wilson. Status Report. Anchor Park. 

ver Service Center, 1978. TIC 457/D36. 18 Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston National Historical Park. Boston. 

Fay, Spofford & Thorndike. Boston Army Supply Base: Final Report to Massachusetts. Oct. 1979. Denver: National Park Service, 1979. 

the Construction Division. United States Army. July 17, 1919. TIC 457/D7. 

— . Report Upon the Utilities at the Boston Army Supply Base Hamlin, P. W.. comp. History of the Boston Naval Shipyard (formerly 

Made to the Construction Division of the United Stales Army. Bos- Boston Navy Yard). 1800-1937. Boston: Boston Naval Shipyard, 

ton: Fori Hill Press, 1919. 1948 TIC 157/D6171. 



1230 



Appendix E, Bibliography 



Harper, Marilyn, et al. World War II & the American Homefront: A Na- 
tional Historic landmarks Theme Study. Washington: National 
Historic Landmarks Program, Cultural Resources, National Park 
Service. 2007. 18 

Heald, Sarah H. Historic Furnishings Report, USS Cassin Young, Bos- 
ton National Historical Park. Boston. Massachusetts. [Harpers 
Ferry, W.Va.]: Media Services. Harpers Ferry Center, National Park 
Service, 2005. TIC 457/D152. 18 

Highland, Jack. Completion Report. Rehabilitate Building 28, 
Charlestown Navy Yard. Contract No. 1443-1600-9-4902. Feb. 
1996. TIC 457/D6320. 

Himmelfarb. David. Ropewalk Study Final Report. 7 vols. 1988. TIC 
457/D6308. 

Hoke, Amy, and Eliot Foulds. Cultural Landscape Report for Fort Ma- 
son. Golden Gate National Recreation Area. Brookline, Mass.: 
Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation, 2004. TIC 641/ 
D451. 18 

Holbrook, Cabot & Rollins Corp. Heavy Construction. Boston: Holbrook, 
Cabot & Rollins. 1921. 

Hutchins. Louis P. Work. Culture, and Resistance to Mechanization in 
the American Rope Making Industry. 1 830- 1 850. Typescript . 1999. 
TIC 457/D6300. 

Jacobs. Scott, Alain Guitian, and Childs Engineering Corporation. His- 
toric Structure Report. Architectural Data Section: The Railroad 
Tracks. Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston National Historical Park, 
Charlestown, Massachusetts. Denver: National Park Service, 1983. 
TIC 457/D2127. 18 

James H. Ballou. Architect. Project Manual for U.S.S. Constitution Mu- 
seum. Apr. 30, 1975. TIC 457/D6321. 

Keeshan. Lalande L. Historic Structure Report, Navy Yard Granite Wall, 
Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston National Historical Park. Boston, 
Massachusetts. Draft. Boston: Boston National Historical Park, 
1981. TIC457/D6081. 

Krent/Paffett Associates. The Navy Yard Signage Plan. Charlestown, 
Massachusetts: Design Recommendations. Draft. Oct. 4, 1989. 
TIC 457/D6397. 18 

Laden, Greg. Archaeological Monitoring of the Chelsea-Water Street 
Connector. Charlestown Navy Yard, Charlestown, Massachusetts. 
1985. TIC 457/D6128. 

Larson, Leslie. The Ropewalk at the Charlestown Navy Yard: A History 
and Reuse Plan. Dec. 30. 1987. TIC 457/D6394. 18 

Louis Berger & Associates. Cultural Resource Group. Cultural Resources 
Survey. Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. Draft. Aug. 1996. 

Mansfield. George O. Q. Boston Naval Shipyard (formerly Boston Navy 
Yard) Historical Review. 1938-1957. Boston: Boston Naval Ship- 
yard, 1957. TIC 457/D6087. 

Marie. Audrey R. Cultural Resources Inventory: Potential Archeologi- 
cal Resources. Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston National Histori- 
cal Park. Denver: Denver Service Center. 1980. TIC 457/D1555. 
— , and Alane Guitian. Historic Structure Report: The Scale 
House. Draft. TIC 457/6065A. 

Massachusetts. Joint Commission on Federal Base Conversion. Recom- 
mendations and Summary of Activities, May. 1973 to May, 1974. 
1974. TIC 457/D6346. 

Massachusetts Port Authority. Business Development and Maritime Depts. 
Massport Marine Terminal: Development Issues And Alternatives 
Analysis - Executive Summary. Dec. 2002. IB 

— . Economic Planning & Development Dept. Waterfront Smart 
Growth: Lessons from the South Boston Waterfront. Doc. 7. 

2007. -a 



McCarthy, Robert J. Appraisal of Charlestown Navy Yard. Charlestown. 

Massachusetts. Dec. 18, 1974. Boston: William H. Dolben & 

Sons, [1975). TIC 457/D6342. 
McGinley Hart & Associates. Historic American Engineering Record: 

Historical Documentation of Selected Structures at the Charlestown 

Navy Yard. Sept. 1993. TIC 457/D6302. 

. Historic Monument Area, Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston, 

Massachusetts. Ill - Audit of Buildings and Sites. July 24, 2000. 

TIC 457/D6295. 

— . Post-Fire Conditions Assessment & Treatment Options for 

Stabilization. Building 58-The Ropewalk, Charlestown Navy Yard. 

Draft. June 2002. TIC 457/D6271. 

— . Shipfitters ' Shop. Building 104. Charlestown Navy Yard: 

Historic American Buildings Survey. July 1992. TIC 457/D6313. 
— . Stabilization Report: Ropewalk-Building 58, Tar House- 
Building 60, Chain Forge-Building 105. Charlestown Navy Yard. 

Draft. May 1991. TIC 457/D6270. 
McGinley Kalsow & Associates. Dry Dock 1 Historic Structure Report. 

Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston National Historical Park. June 

21. 2007. TIC 457/D6348. 18 
McGrath. H. Thomas, Jr., and Anne Booth with Terry Wong. Historic 

Structure Report, Architectural Data Section, Buildings 4 and 5. 

Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston National Historical Park, 

Charlestown, Massachusetts. Denver: Denver Service Center. 1983. 

TIC 457/D2092. 18 
Melvin F. Levine & Associates. A Retail and Attractions Concept for the 

Navy Yard. Draft. Apr. 3, 1987. TIC 457/D6365. 
Metcalf & Eddy. Phase III Remedial Action Plan. Former Charlestown 

Navy Yard. Building No. 105. Boston, Massachusetts. May 1997. 

TIC 457/D6268C. 
Micholet. Margaret A. Public Place. Private Home: A Social History of 

the Commandant's House at the Charlestown Na\y Yard, 1805- 

1974. Boston: Boston National Historical Park. 1986. TIC 457/ 

D6156A. 
Mitchell, Jonathan, Completion Report. Contract No. 1443C4500040905. 

Rehabilitate Building 24. Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston National 

Historical Park. Feb. 2008. TIC 457/D6392. 18 
Naval Facilities Engineering Command. Color for Naval Shore Facili 

ties. NAVFAC P-309. Jan. 1971. Washington: Naval Facilities 

Engineering Command. 1971. 

— . Command History. 1965-1974. OPNAV 5750-1. 18 

— . Engineering Services Center. USS Constitution Barrier. 

Nov. 3, 2006. TIC 457/D6379. 18 
Naval Historical Center. Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. 

8 vols. Washington: Naval History Division/Naval Historical Cen- 
ter, 1959-1981. 

— . Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Vol. l.Pt. 

A. Rev. ed. Washington: Naval Historical Center, 1991. 
Revised and updated version available on Naval Historical Center Dk 
tionan ni r American Naval fighting Ships website. 
New England Aquarium. The New England Aquarium: A Report to the 

Charlestown Community. June 1989. TIC 457/D6380. 18 
Oranchak. Eugene G. Completion Report. Rehabilitation of Bulkheads 

and Piers. Boston National Historical Park. ( 'harlestown Navy 

Yard. Sept. 8, 1981. TIC 457/D6105. 

— . Completion Report. Restoration of Pier 2, Phase I. 

Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston National Historical Park. June 

1986. TIC 457/D6166. 

— . Completion Report. Restoration of Pier 2, Phase II. 

Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston National Historical /'ark June 

1986. TIC457/D6167. 



1231 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Pelletier. David R. Historical Survey of Building 21. June 1982. TIC 
457/061 11. 

Pendery, Steven R., and William A. Griswold. Archeological Testing at 
Building 28, Charlestown Navy Yard. Charlestown, Massachusetts. 
Draft. May 1997. TIC 457/D6396. 

Pousson, John F. Archeological Monitoring Report, Geotechnical Test- 
ing at Building 28, Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston National His- 
torical Park. Nov. 1987. TIC 457/D6395. 

Preble, George Henry. History of the Boston Navy Yard. 1797-1874 [mi- 
crocopy]. Microcopy Ml 18. Washington: National Archives, 1967. 

Pulsifer, Woodbury, comp. Navy Yearbook: Compilation of Annual Na- 
val Appropriations Laws From 1883 to 1912. Senate Doc. No. 
955, 62nd Cong., 3rd sess. Washington: U.S. Govt. Printing Of- 
fice, 1912. 1B 

R. Christopher Goodwin & Associates. Historic Context for Department of 
Defense Facilities: World War II Permanent Construction. Frederick, 
Md.: Goodwin, 1997. B 

— . National Historic Context for Department of Defense Instal- 
lations, 1790-1940: Final Report. 4 vols. Baltimore: Baltimore 
District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1995. B 

— . Navy Cold War Guided Missile Context: Resources Associ- 
ated with the Navy's Guided Missile Program. 1946-1989: Final 
Report. Norfolk, Va.: Atlantic Division, Naval Facilities Engineer- 
ing Command, 1995. 

— . Support and Utility Structures and Facilities (191 7-1946): 
Overview, Inventory, and Treatment Plan: Final Report. Norfolk, 
Va.: Atlantic Division, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, 
1995. B 

Raber, Michael S., and Matthew W. Roth. Boston Naval Shipyard: A 
Plan for Cultural Resource Management in the Buy Parcel Area. 
Feb. 1981. New Haven, Ct: Raber Associates, 1981. TIC 457/ 
D6154. 

Raymond Cattle Co. Development Proposal, Building #149 and Building 
#199, Boston Naval Shipyard at Charlestown. Oct. 6, 1983. TIC 
457/D6403. B 

Richardson, James D.. comp. A Compilation of the Messages and Papers 
of the Presidents. 1789-1897. 10 vols. Washington: U.S. Govt. 
Printing Office, 1896-1899. 

Roberts, Shelley K., and Audrey Marie. Historic Structure Report: Ar- 
chitectural Data and Archeological Data Sections, Building 136, 
Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston National Historical Park. Massa- 
chusetts. Denver: Denver Service Center, 1982. TIC457/D1933. B 

Roosevelt, Franklin D. The Public Papers and Address of Franklin D. 
Roosevelt - 1940 Volume: War- And Aid to Democracies. Samuel 
I. Rosenman, comp. New York: Macmillan, 1941. 

Rubertone, Patricia E., Nain E. Anderson, and Neill DePaoli. Archaeo- 
logical Investigations at the Gate 4 Area, Charlestown Naval Yard. 
Charlestown. Massachusetts. Providence, R.I.: Public Archaeo- 
logical Laboratory, [1980]. TIC 457/D24. 

Schroeder, Clyde L. Historic Structure Report. Captain's Row (Bldg. 
265), Charlestown Navy Yard: Architectural Data, Boston National 
Historical Park. Charlestown. Massachusetts. Draft. Denver: 
Denver Service Center. 1979. TIC 457/D37. B 

SEA Consultants and Normandeau Associates. Assessment ofAlterna 
fives for Remediation at Pier 2. Charlestown Navy Yard. Mar. 
1990. TIC457/D41. B 

Shiman, Philip. Forging the Sword: Defense Production During the Cold 
War USACERL Special Rept, 97/77. July 1977. B 

Snell, Charles W.. comp. Odyssey of USS Cassin Young. 1951-1960. 
June 1979. TIC 457/D6095. 



Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities. The New En- 
gland Museum at the Ropewalk. Apr. 1989. TIC 457/D6377. 

Spero, Michael. Boston Navy Yard and South Boston Annex. July 1940- 
September 1942: A Narrative Describing the Activities of the Small 
Group of Construction Inspectors Who Watched Over the Navy 
Yard Construction at South Boston and Charlestown. Massachu- 
setts. Typescript. Dec. 1986. TIC 457/D6305. 

Stevens, Christopher, et al. Cultural Landscape Report for Charlestown 
Navy Yard. Boston National Historical Park, Boston, Massachu- 
setts. Boston, Mass.: [Olmsted Center for Landscape Preserva- 
tion], National Park Service, 2005. TIC 457/D154. B 

Stone & Webster. Final Interim Evaluation Report. Building 105. Former 
Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston. Massachusetts. Nov. 2000. TIC 
457/D6316. 

. Interim Evaluation Report-II. Building No. 105. Former 

Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston. Massachusetts. Aug. 2002. TIC 
457/D6316A. 

Stone & Webster Environmental Technology & Services. Final Environ- 
mental Assessment Report. Sump Room at Barnes Building. May 
1997. B 

U.S. Army. Marine Crewman's Handbook. Field Manual No. 55-501, 
Dec. 1, 1999. Washington. 1999. B 

— . Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management. Real 
Property Summary And Site Statistics for Fiscal Year 2006 Quar- 
ter 2. Apr. 17, 2006. B 

U.S. Army. Corps of Engineers. New England Division. Boston Harbor, 
Massachusetts. Reserve Channel Survey (Review of Reports). Nov. 
5. 1954. Boston: The Corps. 1954. B" 

U.S. Army Environmental Center. Thematic Study and Guidelines: Iden- 
tification and Evaluation of U.S. Army Cold War Era Military- 
Industrial Historic Properties. Jan. 1998. B 

U.S. Bankruptcy Court. District of Delaware. In re: Competrol Acquisi- 
tion Partnership. L.P.. etal. Debtors: Memorandum Opinion. Case 
Nos. 94-622 through 94-626. Aug. 2. 2000. B 

U.S. Congress. American State Papers: Documents. Legislative and Ex- 
ecutive, of the Congress of the United States. Naval Affairs. 4 
vols. Washington: Gales & Seaton. 1834-1861. 
On-line access provided by Library of Congress .4 Century of Lawmak- 
ingweb site. 

U.S. Congress. House of Representatives. Committee on Armed Ser- 
vices. Status of Shipyards: Hearings by the Seapower Subcommit- 
tee of the Committee on Armed Services. House of Representath es, 
Ninety-first Congress. Second Session. H.A.S.C. No. 91-71. Wash- 
ington: U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1970. 

U.S. Congress. House of Representatives. Committee on Naval Affairs. 
Hearings Before Committee on Naval Affairs of the House of Repre- 
sentatives on Estimates Submitted by the Secretan of the Navy. 1918. 
Washington: U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1918. B 
Includes (p. 839 73) hearings on "Purchase of Dry Dock from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts." 
— . The Sale of the Charlestown Navy Yard. Massachusetts. 
House Rept. No. 1077. 47th Cong.. 1st sess. Washington: U.S. 
Govt. Printing Office, 1882. 

U.S. Congress. Senate. Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. Sub- 
committee on Parks and Recreation. Boston National Historical 
Park: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Parks and Recreation 
of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. United States 
Senate. Ninet) third Congress, First Session, on S.210. Washing- 
ton: U.S. Govt. Printing Office. 1974. 

U.S. Dept. of Defense. Legacy Cold War Project. Coming in From the 
Cold: Military Heritage in the Cold War. [c. 1993]. B 



1232- 



Appendix E, Bibliography 

U.S. Dept. of Defense. Office of Economic Adjustment. Report of Eco- 
nomic Adjustment Program. Mar. 1974. TIC 457/D6345. 
U.S. Dept. of the Interior. Office of Inspector General. Review of National 

Icon Park Security. Report 2003-1-0063. Aug. 2003. 18 
U.S. Federal Highway Administration and Mass. Dept. of Public Works. 
Central Artery (I-93)/Third Harbor Tunnel (1-90) Project: Supple- 
mental Environmental Impact Statement/Report and Supplemental 
Final Section 4(f) Evaluation. Agency Review Draft. 2 vols. 
FHWA-MA-EIS-82-02-DS2. Mar. 1989. TIC 457/D6401. 

. Chelsea-Water Streets Connector, Little Mystic Channel 

Crossing. Charlestown. Boston, Massachusetts: Final Negative 
Declaration, Section 4(f) Statement. June 1978. TIC 457/D2A. 

— . Third Harbor Tunnel, Interstate 90/Central Artery, Inter- 
state 93: Final Environmental Impact Statement and Final Section 
4(f) Evaluation. 2 vols. FHWA-MA-EIS-82-02-F. Aug. 1985. TIC 
457/D6400. 
U.S. General Accounting Office. Environmental Contamination: Cleanup 
Actions at Formerly Used Defense Sites. GAO-01-557. July 
2001. 18 
Detailed project listing appendixes only available on-line: http:// 
www.gao.gov/gao-0 1-101 2sp/. 
U.S. Laws, etc. The Public Statutes at Large. 8 vols. Boston: Little, 
Brown, 1845-1867. 
On-line access provided by Library of Congress A Century of Lawmak- 
ingweb site. 

. The Statutes at Large. Vols. 9-17. Boston: Little, Brown, 

1851-1873. 
On-line access provided by Library of Congress A Century of Lawmak- 
ingweb site. 

. Statutes at Large. Vols. 18-49. Washington: U.S. Govt. 

Printing Office, 1875-1936. 

— . United States Statutes at Large. Vols. 50-118. Washing- 
ton: U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1937-2006. 

U.S. National Park Service. Boston Naval Shipyard: An Alternative for 
Development. Mar. 1975. TIC 457/D872. 

. Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston National Historical Park: 

General Management Plan, Volume II. [Denver]: National Park 
Service. 1980. TIC 457/D1553A. 18 

— . Charlestown Navy Yard Planning Workbook. [1977.] TIC 
457/D1285. 

. Charlestown Navy Yard Special Study, Boston National 

Historical Park. Final report. Sept. 1976. TIC 457/D1080. 

. New Area Master Plan for Boston Naval Shipyard U.S.S. 

Constitution National Historic Site, Boston, Massachusetts. Rev. 
Dec. 1973. TIC 457/D6002A. 

. New Area Study for Boston Naval Shipyard U.S.S. Consti- 
tution National Historic Site. Boston. Massachusetts. Working 
draft. Aug. 3, 1973. TIC 457/D6002. 

— . Denver Service Center, see Denver Service Center. 
— . Eastern Service Center. Office of Environmental Planning 
and Design. Proposed Boston National Historic Sites, Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts. Dec. 1971. TIC 457/D4. 

— . Harpers Ferry Center. Division of Interpretive Planning. A 
Plan for the Interpretation of Boston National Historical Park, 
Charlestown Navy Yard, Massachusetts. Interpretive Prospectus, 
Vol. II. Harpers Ferry, W.Va., 1990. TIC 457/6155B. 

— . North Atlantic Region. Branch of Museum Services. Bos- 
ton National Historical Park Collection Management Plan. Sept. 
1994. Boston, 1994. TIC 457/D6288. 

U.S. Navy. Letter from the Secretary of the Navy, Transmitting ... the 
Report of the Commission on Navy-Yards. Dec. 1, 1883. Senate Ex. 



Doc. No. 55, 48th Cong., 1st sess. Washington: U.S. Govt. Printing 
Office, 1884. 

. Message From the President of the United States, Transmit 

ting ...a Communication ... From the Secretary of the Navy, in 
Relation to the Title by Which the United States Holds the Land Now- 
Occupied as a Navy-Yard at Boston, Mass. Aug. 4, 1882. Senate Ex. 
Doc. No. 195, 47th Cong., 1st sess. Washington: U.S. Govt. Print- 
ing Office, 1882. 

— . Ships Data. U.S. Naval Vessels. 1911. Washington: U.S. 
Govt. Printing Office, 1912. 18 
. Ships Data. U.S. Naval Vessels, January 1, 1914. Washing- 
ton: U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1914. 18 

. Ships' Data, U.S. Naval Vessels, January 1, 1916. Washing- 
ton: U.S. Govt. Printing Office. 1916. 18 
. Ships' Data, U.S. Naval Vessels, October 1. 1919. Washing- 
ton: U.S. Govt. Printing Office. 1920. 

— . Ships' Data. U.S. Naval Vessels. July 1. 1920. Washington: 
U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1920. 18 

. Ships 'Data, U.S. Naval Vessels. July 1. 1921. Washington: 

U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1921. 18 

. Ships' Data, U.S. Naval Vessels. July 1. 1922. Washington: 

U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1922. 18 

. Ships' Data, U.S. Naval Vessels. July 1. 1924. Washington: 

U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1924. 

. Ships 'Data, U.S. Naval Vessels. July 1. 1929. Washington: 

U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1929. 

. Ships 'Data, U.S. Naval Vessels, July 1. 1935. Washington: 

U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1935. 
. Ships' Data, U.S. Naval Vessels. January 1, 1938. Wash- 
ington: U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1938. 

— . Ships' Data. U.S. Naval Vessels. April 1. 1943. Washing- 
ton: U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1943. 
U.S. Navy. Bureau of Construction and Repair. Ships' Data, U.S. Naval 

Vessels, 1912. Washington: U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1913. 18 
U.S. Navy. Bureau of Ships. Naval Vessel Register. 1 January 1949. 
NAVSHIPS 18-1-11. Washington: Dept. of the Navy, 1949. "S 

. Ship Contracts Awarded. 1 January 1934-1 July 1956. Pri 

vate and U.S. Naval Shipyards. NAVSHIPS 250-64 L Washing- 
ton: Dept. of the Navy, 1956. 

— . Ships' Data. U.S. Naval Vessels, April 15, 1945. 3 vols. 
NAVSHIPS 250-010. Oil. 012. Washington: U.S. Govt. Printing 
Office, 1945-1946. 18 
U.S. Navy. Bureau of Yards and Docks. Activities of the Bureau of Yards 
and Docks, Navy Department, World War, 1917 1918. Washing- 
ton: U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1921. 18 

— . {Berthing and Ship Repair Facilities]. Jan. 1. 1944. 
Copy in author's collection lacks title page. 
— . Building the Navy's Bases in World War II: History of the 
Bureau of Yards and Docks and the Civil Engineer Corps. 1940- 
1946. 2 vols. Washington: U.S. Govt. Printing Office. 1947. 
Available on-line at HyperWar. 

—. Federal Owned Real Estate Under the Control of the Navy 
Department. Washington: U.S. Govt. Printing Office. 1937. 

— . Public Works of the Navy Under the Cognizance of the 
Bureau of Yards and Docks and the Corps of Civil Engineers. U.S. 
Navy Bulletin No. 24, Sept. 1916. Washington, 1916. 

— . Shipbuilding and Docking Facilities. NAVDOCKS P-253. 
Apr. 26, 1948. 

U.S. Office of Economic Adjustment. Report of Economic Adjustment 
Program. Metropolitan Boston. Mar. 1974. Washington: Office oi 



1233 



Economic Adjustment, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
(Installations & Logistics), 1974. TIC 457/D6353. 

U.S. Office of Naval Records & History. Glossary of U.S. Naval Abbrevia- 
tions. 5th ed. OPNAV29-P1000. Apr. 1949. Washington, 1949. 

U.S. Supreme Court. Cases Adjudged and Decided in the Supreme Court of 
the United States. 9, 10. 11. 12 Peters. Lawyers ed., Book 9. Roch- 
ester, N.Y.: Lawyers Co-Operative Pub. Co., 1883. 18 
Includes decision in the case of Harris et al. v. Elliott (10 Peters 25-57:9 
L.ed. 333-45). 

United States Naval Administration. World War II: Commandant. First 
Naval District [microform]. 11 vols. Typescript. 1946. 

USS Constitution Museum. USS Constitution Museum Expansion Plan. 
Boston, n.d. TIC 457/D6322. 

Wade, Michael .]., et al. Summary Evaluation of the Environmental Im- 
pact Resulting from the Use of Creosoted Pilings in the Historic 
Restoration of Pier #2 at the Charlestown Navy Yard. Sept. 3, 
1987. Duxbury, Mass.: Battelle Ocean Sciences, 1987. TIC 457/ 
D71. 

Waite, Diana S. Historical Study of the Charlestown Navy Yard Rope- 
walk and Tar House. Draft. May 1991. TIC 457/D6306. 

Wallace, Floyd, Ellenzweig, Inc.. et al. Land Use and Transportation 
Study. Boston Naval Shipyard: Phase II Report. July 19, 1974. 
TIC 457/D6006. ffl 

— . National Historic Preservation Act Section 106 Prelimi- 
nary Consultation: Effects of North Terminal Area Highway Im- 
provements on the Boston Naval Shipyard. Rev. Sept. 26, 1973. 
TIC 457/D8. 

Wallace, Floyd, Ellenzweig, Moore. Master Plan & Feasibility Study. 
Massachusetts College of Art at the Boston Naval Shipyard, 
Charlestown. Part 2. Mass. State Project E76-11. Draft. July 
1968. [Boston]: Mass. Executive Office of Administration and Fi- 
nance, Bureau of Building Construction, 1968. TIC 457/D61 14. 

Webster, Julie L., Patrick E. Reicher, and Gordon L. Cohen. Antiterror- 
ism Measures for Historic Properties. ERDC/LAB TR-06-23. 
Champagne, 111.: Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, 
U.S. Army Engineer Research & Development Center, 2006. © 

Wegner, Dana M. Fouled Anchors: The Constellation Question Answered. 
DTRC-91/CT06. Bethesda, Md.: David Taylor Research Center. 
1991. 18 

Weidlinger Associates. Building 75. Charlestown Navy Yard: Field Sur- 
vey and Structural Engineering Report of Existing Conditions. Mar. 
1,1993. TIC 457/D6369. 

Weinbaum, Paul 0. Building 10 Historic Structure Report: Historical 
Data Section. Draft. July 1988. TIC 457/D6309. 

— . Hoosac Docks: Foreign Trade Terminal. Cultural Resource 
Management Study No. 11. Boston: Division of Cultural Resources, 
North Atlantic Region, National Park Service, 1985. TIC 457/ 
D6117A. 

Wondercabinet Interpretive Design. Charlestown Navy Yard: Ropewalk 
Building: Educational Exhibit Assessment Report. Dec. 6, 2002. 
TIC 457/D6393. 

Wright, David. Boston Naval Shipyard Architectural and Environmental 
Inventory. May 17, 1974. TIC 457/D6005. 

Yacht Club International. Yacht Club International Brochure Draft. Feb. 
3. 1989. TIC 457/D6398. 18 

AcademicTheses 

Abbott. Frederick K. The Role of the Civil Engineer in Internal Improve 
ments: The Contributions of the Two Loammi Baldwins. Father 
and Son. 1776-1838. Ph.D. dissertation. Columbia University, 
1952. 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 

Bernardo, Celeste. There Were No "Sheila Ship fitters ": Gender Segrega- 
tion at the Boston Navy Yard. 1942 to 1945. M.A. thesis, North- 
eastern University, 2001. TIC 457/D6389. 

Davis, Helen W., Edward M. Hatch, and David G. Wright. An Initial 
Investigation Into the Architectural History of the Boston Naval Ship- 
yard. Dec. 20, 1972. Thesis, Architectural History l-2b, Graduate 
School of Design. Harvard University. TIC 457/D6170. 

Donofrio. Julie Therese. Preservation as a Tool for Waterfront Revitaliza- 
tion: Design. Management, and Financing Solutions from Vancouver. 
Boston, and London. M.S. thesis, University of Pennsylvania. 
2007. 18 

Hill, Catherine Alison. The Political Economy of Military Base Redevel- 
opment: An Evaluation of Four Converted Naval Bases. Ph.D. 
dissertation, Rutgers. 1998. 

Kaufman, James A. Siting Amenities and the Public Review Process: The 
Kennedy Library in Cambridge and New England Aquarium in the 
Charlestown Navy Yard. M.C.P. thesis, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1990. 18 

Pendery, Steven Roger. Symbols of Community: Status Differences and 
the Archaeological Record in Charlestown. Massachusetts. 1630- 
1760. Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard University 1987. 

Sorenson, Megan Laurel. Comparative Analysis of Two Urban Historic 
Military Base Redevelopment Projects: The Presidio of San Fran- 
cisco and Boston's Charlestown Navy Yard. M.S. thesis. Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. 2002. 18 

Van Vlandren, Jennifer. Defended Neighborhoods: Charlestown and the 
Charlestown Navy Yard. M.A. thesis, Boston University, 1992. 

Books 

Ahem, Joseph-James. Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. Images of America. 
Dover, N.H.: Arcadia. 1997. 

Axelrod. Alan. Encyclopedia of the U.S. Navy. New York: Checkmark 
Books, 2006 

Baker, William A. A History of the Boston Marine Society. 1742-1967. 
Boston: Boston Marine Society, 1968. 

Bartow. Aquilla P., and Elizabeth Bartow Berg, comps. Gleanings From 
the Records of the Boston Marine Society Through Its Second Cen- 
tury 1842 to 1942. Boston: The Society. 1999. 

Bauer, K. Jack, and Stephen S. Roberts. Register of Ships of the U.S. 
Navy, 1775-1990: Major Combatants. New York: Greenwood Press, 
1991. 

Bennett. Frank M. The Steam Navy of the United States. Pittsburgh: 
Warren. 1897. 

Berner. Thomas F. The Brooklyn Navy Yard. Images of America. Charles- 
ton. S.C.: Arcadia, 1999. 

Beschloss. Michael, ed. Taking Charge: The Johnson White House Tapes. 
1963-1964. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997. 

Bishop, David J. Naval Submarine Base New London. Images of America. 
Charleston. S.C.: Arcadia. 2005. 

Bither, Barbara A., and Boston National Historical Park. Charlestown 
Navy Yard. Images of America. Charleston. S.C.: Arcadia. 1999. 

Bonner. Kit. and Carolyn Bonner. Warship Boneyards. Osceola. Wise: 
MBI Publishing. 2001. 

The Boston Naval Shipyard, Boston. Massachusetts. Reprint from U.S. 
Naval Institute Pmceedings, vol. 86 (Oct. 1960). 

Brennan. Robert E.. and Jeannie I. Brennan. Sackets Harbor. Images of 
America. Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia. 2000. 

Brodine, Charles E.. Jr.. Michael J. Crawford, and Christine F. Hughes. 
Interpreting Old Ironsides: An Illustrated Guide to USS Constitu- 
tion. Washington: Naval Historical Center. 2007. 



1234 



Appendix E, Bibliography 

Cable, John H., ed. Building Redesign and Energy Challenges. Washing- 
ton: American Institute of Architects, 1985. 
This collection of papers from a conference includes "Rehabing Historic 
Structures With Energy Conservation: Constitution Quarters. Charlestown 
Navy Yard" by Edward 0. Nilsson. 
Callahan, Edward A., ed. List of Officers of the Navy of the United States 
and of the Marine Corps from 1 775 to 1900. New York: Hamersly, 
1901. 
Revised and updated version available on Naval Historical Center Offic- 
ers of the Continental and U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, 1775-1900 
web site. 
Canney. Donald L. The Old Steam Navy. 2 vols. Annapolis: Naval Insti- 
tute Press, 1990-1993. 

— . Sailing Warships of the US Navy. Annapolis: Naval Insti- 
tute Press, 2001. 
Chapelle, Howard I. History of the American Sailing Navy: The Ships 

and Their Development. New York: Norton, 1949. 
Coletta, Paolo E., ed. United States Navy and Marine Corps Bases, Do- 
mestic. Westport, Ct.: Greenwood Press, 1985. 
Crandall Dry Dock Engineers. A Short History of Railway Dry Docks 

Since Their Inception in 1854. Cambridge, Mass., 1950. 
Cutler, Deborah W., and Thomas J. Cutler. Dictionary of Naval Abbre- 
viations. 4th ed. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2005. 

— . Dictionary of Naval Terms. 5th ed. Annapolis: Naval In- 
stitute Press, 2005. 
Dowart, Jeffrey M, with Jean K. Wolf. The Philadelphia Navy Yard: 
From the Birth of the U.S. Navy to the Nuclear Age. Philadelphia: 
University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001. 
Earls, Alan R. Watertown Arsenal. Images of America. Charleston, S.C.: 

Arcadia, 2007. 
Ford. Charles, ed. Immersed Tunnel Techniques 2. London: Thomas 
Telford. 1997. 
This collection of papers from an international conference includes "From 
Concept to Completion: The Ted Williams Tunnel" by Anthony R. Lan- 
cellotti and Walter C. Grantz. 

Friedman, Norman. U.S. Amphibious Ships and Craft: An Illustrated 
Design History. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2002. 

— . U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History. Annapo- 
lis: Naval Institute Press, 1985. 

. U.S. Cruisers: An Illustrated Design History. Annapolis: 

Naval Institute Press, 1984. 

— . U.S. Destroyers: An Illustrated Design History. Annapo- 
lis: Naval Institute Press. 1982. 

Furer, Julius Augustus. Administration of the Navy Department in World 
War II. Washington: Naval History Division, 1959. 
Available on-line at HyperWar. 

Garbin. Randy. Diners of New England. Mechanicsburg, Pa.: Stackpole 
Books." 2005. 

Gaynor, Frank, ed. The New Military and Naval Dictionary. New York: 
Philosophical Library, 1951. 

Gillmer, Thomas C. Old Ironsides: The Rise. Decline, and Resurrection 
of the c755Constitution. Camden. Me.: International Marine, 1993. 

Goodspeed, M. Hill. U.S. Navy: A Complete History. Washington: Naval 
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Hagan, Kenneth J. This People's Navy: The Making of American Sea 
Power. New York: Free Press, 1992. 

— , ed. //; Peace and War: Interpretations of American Naval 
History. 1775-1984. 2nd ed. Westport, Ct.: Greenwood Press, 
1985.' 

Halevi, Marcus, and George Putz. The Spirit of Massachusetts: Building 
a Tall Ship. 1983-1984. Thorndike, Me.: Thorndike Press, 1984. 



Harmon, J. Scott. U.S.S. Cassin Young (DD-793): A Fletcher Class De- 
stroyer. Missoula, Mont.: Pictorial Histories Publishing Co., 1985. 

Hepburn, Richard D. History of American Naval Dry Docks: A Key In- 
gredient to a Maritime Power. Arlington, Va.: Noesis, 2003. 

Hess, Ron, et al. The Closing and Reuse of the Philadelphia Naval Ship- 
yard. MR-1364-Navy. Santa Monica, Calif.: National Defense 
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Hibben, Henry B. Navy-Yard, Washington: History from Organization. 
1799, to Present Date. Washington: U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 
1890. 

Junior League of Boston. 2004 Decorators ' Show House: The Comman- 
dant's House. Annapolis, Md.: Cyphers Agency, 2004. 

Landauer, Lyndall, and Donald Landauer. Pearl: The History of the United 
States Navy in Pearl Harbor. South Lake Tahoe, Calif.: Flying 
Cloud Press, 1999. 

Lemmon, Sue. Closure: The Final Twenty Years of Mare Island Naval 
Shipyard. Vallejo, Calif.: Sue Lemmon & Silverback Books, 2001. 

, and Ernest D. Wichels. Sidewheelers to Nuclear Power: A 

Pictorial Essay Covering 123 Years at the Mare Island Naval Ship- 
yard. Annapolis: Leeward Publications, 1977. 

Lewis, Ann-Eliza H . , ed. Highway to the Past: The Archeology of Boston s 
Big Dig. Boston: Secretary of the Commonwealth, 2001. 

Linder, Bruce. Tidewater s Navy: An Illustrated History. Annapolis: Naval 
Institute Press, 2005. 

Lott, Arnold S. A Long Line of Ships: Mare Island's Century of Naval 
Activity in California. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1954. 

Lull, Edward P. History of the United States Navy-Yard at Gosport, Vir- 
ginia (Near Norfolk). Washington: U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1874. 

Madsen, Daniel. Forgotten Fleet: The Mothball Navy. Annapolis: Naval 
Institute Press, 1999 

Maloney, Linda M. 77?e Captain From Connecticut: The Life and Naval 
Times of Isaac Hull. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1986. 

Manuel, Dale. Pensacola Bay: A Military History. Images of America. 
Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia, 2004. 

Marolda, Edward J. By Sea, Air, and Land: An Illustrated History of the 
U.S. Navy and the War in Southeast Asia. Washington: Naval His- 
torical Center, 1994. 
Available on-line at http://www.history.navy.mil/seairland/index.hunl. 
- The Washington Navy Yard: An Illustrated History. Wash- 
ington: Naval Historical Center, 1999. 

Martin, Tyrone G A Most Fortunate Ship: A Narrative History of Old 
Ironsides. Rev. ed. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1997. 

McDonnell, Janet A. 77?e National Park Service: Responding to the Sep- 
tember 11 Terrorist Attacks. Washington: National Park Service, 
2004. 18 

McNeil, Jim. Charleston's Navy Yard: A Picture History. Charleston, 
S.C.: Coker Craft Press, 1985. 

Morison, Samuel L., and John S. Rowe. The Ships and Aircraft of the 
U.S. Fleet. 10th ed. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1975. 

Norton, Bettina A. The Boston Naval Shipyard. 1800-1974. Boston: The 
Bostonian Society, 1975. 

Parkman, Aubrey. Army Engineers in New England: The Military and 
Civil Work of the Corps of Engineers in New England. 1775-1975. 
Waltham, Mass.: New England Division, U.S. Army Corps of En- 
gineers, 1978. 18 

Pearce, George F. The U.S. Navy in Pensacola: From Sailing Ships to 
Naval Aviation, 1825-1930. Pensacola: University Presses of 
Florida. 1980. 

Peck, Taylor. Round Shot to Rockets: A History of the Washington \,i\ i 
Yard and U.S. Naval Gun Factory. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 
1949. 



1235 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Peltier, Eugene J. The Bureau of Yards and Docks of the Navy and the Civil 
Engineer Corps. New York: Newcomen Society in North America, 
1961. 

Perry, Fredi. Bremerton and Puget Sound Navy Yard. Bremerton, Wash.: 
Perry Publishing, 2002. 

Preble, George Henry. History of the United States Navy -Yard at Ports- 
mouth. N.H. Washington: U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1892. 

— . "The Navy, and the Charlestown Navy Yard," The Memo- 
rial History of Boston. Including Suffolk County Massachusetts, 
1630-1880. Justin Winsor, ed. (Boston: James R. Osgood & Co.), 
3:331-368. 

Rawn, William. Architecture for the Public Realm. New York: Edizioni 
Press, 2002. 

Reh, Louise M., and Helen Lou Ross. Nipsic to Nimitz: A Centennial 
History of Puget Sound Na val Shipyard. Bremerton , Wash. : Olym- 
pic Peninsula Chapter, Federally Employed Women, 1991. 

Rowe, John S., and Samuel L. Morison. The Ships and Aircraft of the 
U.S. Fleet. 9th ed. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1972. 

Seasholes, Nancy S. Gaining Ground: Boston Landmaking. 1630s- 1980s. 
Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2003. 

Seidman, Karl F. Economic Development and Finance. Thousand Oaks, 
Calif.: Sage Publications, 2004. 

Sharp, John G. History of the Washington Navy Yard Civilian Workforce, 
1799-1962. Washington: Naval District Washington, Washington 
Navy Yard, 2005. 18 

Silverstone, Paul H. Civil War Navies. 1855-1883. The U.S. Navy War- 
ship Series. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2001. 

— . The Navy of the Nuclear Age. 1947-2007. The U.S. Navy 
Warship Series. New York: Routledge, 2008. 

-. The Navy of World War II. 1922-1947. The U.S. Navy 
Warship Series. New York: Routledge, 2007. 

— . The New Navy. 1883-1922. The U.S. Navy Warship Series. 
New York: Routledge, 2006. 

— . The Sailing Navy. 1775-1854. The U.S. Navy Warship 
Series. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2001. 

Small, Edwin W. Early Wharf Building. Rev. ed. Salem, Mass.: Eastern 
National Park & Monument Association. 1970. 
Original ed. (Wharf Building of a Century and More Ago [194 1|) 
availablwe on-line at http://www.nps.gov/history/history7online_books/ 
popuIar/9/index. htm 

Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. Historical Transac- 
tions. 1893-1943. New York: The Society, 1945. 

The Stranger s Guide and Conductor to the U.S. Navy Yard at Charlestown, 
Mass. Charlestown, Mass.: A.B. Needham, 1852. 

Stuart, Charles B. The Naval Dry Docks of the United States. New York: 
Charles B. Norton, Irving House, 1852. 

U.S. National Park Service. Division of Publications. Charlestown Navy 
Yard, Boston National Historical Park, Boston, Massachusetts. Of- 
ficial National Park Handbook 152. Washington: U.S. Dept. of the 
Interior, 1995. 

Vanderwarker, Peter. The Big Dig: Reshaping an American City. Bos- 
ton: Little, Brown, 2001. 

Veronico, Nicholas A. World War II Shipyards By the Bay. Images of 
America. Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia, 2007. 

Wardlow, Chester. The Transportation Corps: Movements, Training, and 
Supply. United States Army in World War II: The Technical Ser- 
vices. Washington: Office of the Chief of Military History, 1956. 

Weiss, Howard F. The Preservation of Structural Timber. 2nd ed. New 
York: McGraw-Hill. 1916. 

Whitaker, Robert H. Portsmouth Kitten Naval Shipyard in Old Photo- 
graphs. Stroud, Gloucestershire. England: Alan Sutton, 1993. 



Winklareth, Robert J. Naval Shipbuilders of the World: From the Age of 
Sail to the Present Day. London: Chatham Publishing, 2000. 

Winslow. Richard E.. III. "Do Your Job!": An Illustrated Bicentennial 
History of the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, 1800-2000. Portsmouth 
Marine Society Publication No. 26. Portsmouth, N.H.: Randall. 
2000. 

Young, Alfred F. The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: Memory and the 
American Revolution. Boston: Beacon Press. 1999. 

Articles And Periodicals 

Adamiak, Stanley J. "A Naval Depot on the Western Waters: The Rise 

and Fall of the Memphis Navy Yard, 1844-1854," International 

Journal of Naval History, 1 (Apr. 2002). 18 
Belcher, Jonathan. "1995 MBTA Vehicle Inventory as of January 31, 

1996 - Bus Route Notes," Rollsign: The Magazine of New En- 
gland Transit News, vol. 32. no. 1/2 (Jan./Feb. 1996). 
"Big Boston Terminal Will Promote Port Development," Marine Review. 

vol. 50 (Mar. 1920). 
Boston Naval Shipyard News. Vol. 10, no. 25 (Dec. 15. 1945)-vol. 38, no. 

19 (Mar. 15, 1974). 
Boston Navy Yard News. Vol. 1. no. 1 (Jan. 10, 1936)-vol. 10. no. 24 

(Dec. 1, 1945). 
The Broadside/Boston National Historical Park. Vol. 1, No. 1 (Summer 

1975)-No. 1, 2009. 
Suspended 1981-1990, 2003. 
Cornfeld, B. A. "Long Beach Supports Ships and People," All Hands, no. 

796 (May 1983). 
Davis, H. F. D. "Building Major Combatant Ships in World War II." U.S. 

Naval Institute Proceedings, vol. 73 (May 1947). 
Davis, Helen W., Edward M. Hatch, and David G. Wright. "Alexander 

Parris: Innovator in Naval Facility Architecture," IA: The Journal 

of the Society for Industrial Archeology, vol. 2. no. 1 (1976). 
Formichella. Andrew. "Tensile Pavilion in Boston." Architecture Week, 

no. 59 (July 25. 2001). 
Gordon, David L.A. "Implementing Urban Waterfront Redevelopment in 

an Historic Context: A Case Study of the Boston Naval Shipyard," 

Ocean & Coastal Management, vol. 42 (1999). " 
Hattendorf, John B. "The Decision to Close Rhode Island Bases in 1973." 

Newport History: Journal of the Newport Historical Societw vol. 

79. no. 262 (Spring 2010). ffi 
Melhuish, Christopher Allan. "Will the Navy Unshackle Old Ironsides?.' 

Naval History, vol. 21, no. 3 (June 2007). 1B 
Morison, Samuel Loring. "A Matter of Class, Part III," Naval History. 

vol. 9, no. 2 (Mar./Apr. 1995). 18 

— . "A Matter of Class. Part IV" Naval History, vol. 9. no. 4 

(July/Aug. 1995). 18 
Morss. Stratford. "Drydocking ex- USS Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. (DD-850) : 

Stabilizing and Restoring a Museum Ship," Warship International, 

vol. 27.no. 1 (1990). 
"New Wing Marks Museum's First 20 Years: Board Secretary [Leon] 

Kaufman Reminisces." Constitution Chronicle. Fall/Winter 1996/ 

1997. 
O'Gorman, James F. "H. and J.E. Billings of Boston: From Classicism lo 

the Picturesque." Journal of the Society of Architectural Histori- 
ans, vol. 42. no. 1 (Mar. 1983). 18 
Primack. Phil. "You'll Sink Our Battleship!," Boston Magazine, vol. 45. 

no. 11 (Nov. 2007). 18 
Roberts. Stephen S. "U.S. Navy Building Programs During World War 

II." Warship International, vol. 18. no. 3 (1981). 
Updated version available on-line as The United States Maw in 



1236 



Appendix E, Bibliography 



World War II: Shipbuilding Programs and Contracts. 19381945 
[http://www.shipscribe.com/shiprefs/usnprog/index.html]. 

Speelman, Jennifer. "Revitalizing a Neglected Past: U.S. Naval History," 

Organization of American Historians Magazine of History, vol. 22, 

no. 4 (Oct. 2008). 
Steele, Peter. "To Rehabilitate a Warship," CRM Bulletin, vol. 7, no. 2 

(July 1984). 18 
Travers. Robin. "Seaport's Boat Shop." Seaport News (New England 

Historic Seaport), Jan. 1988. 

Internet Documents & Sites 

Adams, Don, and Arlene Goldbard. New Deal Cultural Programs: Ex- 
periments in Cultural Democracy. 1995. [http://www.wwcd.org/ 
policy/US/newdeal.html] 18 

American Society of Civil Engineers. History & Heritage of Civil Engi- 
neering: Landmarks and Historic Works: Domestic Landmarks: 
Massachusetts, [http://www.asce.org/history/landmarks/massachu- 
setts.html] 

Anderson, Steve. Ted Williams Tunnel Historic Overview, [http:// 
www.bostonroads.com/crossings/ted-williams] 

Belcher, Jonathan. Changes to Transit Service in the MBTA District, 
1964-2009. Dec. 24, 2009. [http://mysite.verizon.net/rtspcc/MBTA 
RouteHistory.pdf] 18 

Boston HarborWalk. [http://www.bostonharborwalk.com/index.php] 

Boston Redevelopment Authority. Boston Redevelopment Authority, [http: 
//www.bostonredevelopmentauthori ty.org] 
Includes board minutes of both the BRA and the EDIC and BRA press 
releases since 2002. 

Carlson, Stephen P. Dry Dock No. 1. Charlestown Navy Yard. Paper 

presented to Seventh Maritime Heritage Conference, Oct. 2004. 

[http://www.hnsa.org/conf2004/papers/carlson.htm] * 
Constellation Wharf. Welcome to Constellation Wharf on Pier 7. [http:// 

constellationwharf.com] 
Federation of American Scientists. Military Analysis Network: Shipyards. 

[http://www.fas.org/man/company/ shipyard] 
Friends of the Charlestown Navy Yard. Friends of the Charlestown Navy 

Yard, [http://friendscny.orgl 
Gibson, Charles Dana. Ships and Men of the Army Transport Service 

(ATS). 1999. [http://www.usmm.org/atshistory.html] 
HarborView at the Navy Yard. HarborView at the Navy Yard, [http:// 

www.harborviewnavyyard.com] 
HyperWar: A Hypertext History of the Second World War. [http:// 

www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/] 
Provides on-line access to numerous official histories, including Build- 
ing the Navy's Bases in World War II. 
Library of Congress. A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: U.S. 

Congressional Documents and Debates, 1774-1875. [http:// 

memory.loc.gov/ammem/amlaw/lawhome.html] 
Provides on-line access to American State Papers and Statutes at Large, 
vol. 1-18. 
Massachusetts Port Authority. Port of Boston, [http://www.massport.com/ 

ports/] 
MGH Institute of Health Professions. About Us. [http://www.mghihp.edu/ 

about-us/default.aspx) 
Morss, Strafford. Underwater Hull Preservation: Case Studies of Five 

Historic Steel Vessels in Saltwater. 2002. [http://www.hnsa.org/ 

handbook/morssl.htm] 



Naval Historical Center. Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. 
[http://www.history/navy.mil/danfs/index.html] 
Provides on-line access to and updated versions of entries in the printed 
Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. 
— . Officers of the Continental and U.S. Navy and Marine 
Corps, 1775-1900. [http://www.history.navy.mil/books/callahan/ 
index.html 
Provides on line access to and updated versions of entries in Edward A. 
Callahan, ed. List of Officers of the Navy of the United States and of the 
Marine Corps from 1775 to 1900. 
Naval Sea Systems Command. Naval Vessel Register, [http://www.nvr. 

navy.mil] 
Navy Yard 33. [http://www.navyyard33.com] 

Norfolk Naval Shipyard. NNSY History: How Did the Navy's Oldest and 
Most Successful Shipyard Come to be Called Norfolk Naval Ship- 
yard?. [http://www.nnsyl.navy.mil/History/NAME.HTM] t 
Otton, Patrick. USS Constitution Rehabilitation and Restoration. Naval 
Historical Center Detachment Boston, Mar. 1997. [http://www.his- 
tory.navy. mil/constitution/restore. htm] 
Parris Landing at the Navy Yard. Welcome to Parris Landing, [http:// 

www.parrislanding.com] 
Reserve Training Boats of the US Submarine Service, [http:// 

www.submarinesailor.com/Boats/Reserve/Reserve.asp] 
Roberts, Stephen S. 77?e United States Navy in World War II: Shipbuild- 
ing Programs and Contracts, 1938-1945. [http://www.shipscribe. 
com/shiprefs/usnprog/index.html] 18 
Updated version of his article "U.S. Navy Building Programs During 
World War II." 

Seaport Campus. School History, [http://www.sfcinc.org/seaport/ 
history.html] 

Shipways Condominium. Shipways Condominium. [http://www.shipway 
place.com] 

Shipyard Quarters Marina. Shipyard Quarters Marina, [http://www.ship 
yardquartersmarina.com] 

Stobo, John R. 77;e Brooklyn Navy Yard: Civil Servants Building War- 
ships. [http://www.columbia.edu/%7Ejrs9/BNY.html] 

Troops and Cargo Transported During World War II Under U.S. Army 
Control, [http://www.usmm.net/armycargo.html] 

U.S. Dept. of Defense. Defense Environmental Programs Annual Report 
to Congress. Fiscal Year 2004-2007. [https://www.denix.osd.mil/ 
portal/page/portal/denix/environment/ARC] 

— . Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) An- 
nual Report to Congress. Fiscal Year 1994-2003. [https:// 
www.denix.osd.mil/portal/page/portal/denix/environment/ARC] 

U.S. National Park Service. Park Histories, [http://www.nps.gov/his- 
tory/history/park_histories/index.htm] 
Provides access to books, reports, and other documents relating to the 
National Park System. 

Audiovisual Materials 

TheStoryofa Transport: The Wartime Career of the c/55Wakefield [DVD], 
Chicago: International Historic Films, 2005. 

USS Cassin Young: A Video Tour [DVD]. Boston: Boston National His- 
torical Park. 2006. 



1237 - 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



1238 



Appendix F 

Existing Conditions Drawings 



THIS APPENDIX contains Existing Conditions drawings (457/ 
62355) for the Boston Naval Shipyard National Historic Land- 
mark. They show both the Charlestown Navy Yard and South 
Boston Annex (Boston Marine Industrial Park) as of January 2006. 
While they were prepared specifically for this Historic Resource 
Study, they are intended to be used for other purposes as stand- 
alone drawings. 

The drawings were prepared from a variety of existing sources 
listed on the cover sheet, as well from aerial photographs. No field 
survey work was done to verify exact dimensions, so these draw- 
ings should not be regarded as being precisely to scale. Because of 
their size and intended use, minor features and vegetation are not 
shown. Similarly, the boundary lines indicated for the Charlestown 
Navy Yard unit of Boston National Historical Park are the best inter- 



pretation of the available data. As stated in Chapter 4, this study 
recommends that the NPS and the Boston Redevelopment Author- 
ity review the boundary lines in the vicinity of the Ropewalk, Tar- 
ring House, Chain Forge, and Public Works Shop to provide realis- 
tic boundaries which reflect both operational needs and effective 
legal jurisdiction for law enforcement purposes. A professional 
boundary survey should also be done. 

The drawings differentiate between contributing (historic) and 
non-contributing (post-historic) resources, reflecting the assess- 
ment of individual resources shown in Chapter 5. With the excep- 
tion of the West Jetty and the former Piers 1 to 4 at South Boston, no 
attempt has been made to locate resources which are no longer 
extant. These can be found on the various historic site plans in- 
cluded in Chapters 2 and 3 of this report. 



- 1239 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



1240 - 





ATI HOUII 



MM.. 







\ 



SOUTH 
BOSTON 







, '»«. . 



<m suuuep 



ri 



^uhr^ 



LOCATION PLAN 







BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



BOSTON NAVAL 
SHIPYARD 

NATIONAL HISTORIC 
LANDMARK 

EXISTING 
CONDITIONS, 2006 




SHEET LIST 

1. TITLE SHEET 

2. BOSTOM NAVAL SHIPYARD - CHARLESTOWN NAVY YARD 
3 BOSTON NAVAL SHIPYARD - SOUTH BOSTON ANNEX 



^ 



CHARLESTOWN 



CHARLES RIVER 



NORTH 
END 




CRANE TRACK- 



HISTORIC STRUCTURE 



HISTORIC BUILDING LETTER 
OR NUMBER 

NON-HISTORIC STRUCTURES 

STREET NUMBER OF 
NON-HISTORICAL BUILDING 



PIERHEAD AND BULKHEAD LINE 
AND NAVY BOUNDARY 



■RAILROAD TRACKS PAfiAU R 
TO CRANE TRACKS ARE 
NOT SHOWN FOR CLARITY 



BOSTON INNER HARBOR 



a 
a 



Index 



THIS INDEX includes all proper names (including indirect 
and shortened forms, as well as specific titles without indi- 
vidual names attached to them such as Commandant) and 
major topics included within the text, captions, informational foot- 
notes, and selected appendices, except for bibliographical-type 
material, glossary entries, names found in tables or place names 
associated with corporate names, and the generic terms Charlestown 
Navy Yard, Navy, and South Boston Annex. Individual resources 
within the Charlestown Navy Yard and other sites are listed under 



those entries. No distinction is made between successive facilities 
which have borne the same number. No cross-references are made 
from names of individual buildings to their building numbers. Page 
numbers shown in bold type indicate distinct subject areas in the 
text and sidebars, as well as the main entry for a particular re- 
source in Chapter 5. Compound names of companies and ships 
are entered under the first word of the name, with no cross-refer- 
ences from the last name. Where multiple terms refer to the same 
entity, cross-references are provided to the term used in the index. 



3rd Missile Battalion, 1101 

5-11 Drydock Ave. (North Coast Sea-Foods), 340, 344-345, 356, 
1151 

5-11 Drydock LLC, 344. 1151 

16th Fleet. See Navy, U.S. - Fleets -Atlantic Reserve Fleet (16th 
Fleet) 

52nd Artillery 

3rd Missile Battalion 
Battery A, 1101 

94th Army Regional Readiness Command (RRC), 713 

150 Causeway Street. See Boston (Mass.) - North Station Indus- 
trial Building 

666 Summer Street. See Boston Army Base 

1812 Marines (reenactors). 254, 1152 

1876 International Centennial Exposition, Philadelphia, 547, 1091 

1892 Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1091 



A-Form Architecture, 888 

'A.B.C.'sof B.N.S." (cartoon), 1117-1123 

abbreviations used, x, 396 

Abe Lincoln (fire engine), 503, 1006 

Above All Transportation, 717 

Above Deck (restaurant). See Tavern on the Water 

ABSD-3. USS (ABSD-3) (floating dry dock), 14 

AC Cruise Lines, 346, 887-889, 1149 

See also later name Boston Seaport Boat Charters 
Acadia National Park, 1178 
Acquaviva, George R., 1209 
Acushnet, USCG, 831 

Ad Hoc Committee for a Safe Boston Harbor, 324 
Adams. Charles Francis. 1139, 1151 
Adams, John, 15, 1077, 1151 
Adams. John Quincy, 11, 31n70, 34, 760-761, 1081 
Adams. USS (screw sloop), 58, 1089, 1159, 1159n1 
Admiral Duff (ship), 477 
Admirals Hill. See under Chelsea (Mass.) 
The Admiralty. See Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - Other 

Structures & Facilities - HarborView at the Navy Yard 
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation 

abbreviation for, 1193 

BNHP General Management Plan, 215 

Building 42 redevelopment, 515 

Building 58 (Ropewalk) equipment preservation, 205-206 

Building 105 (Forge Shop) equipment preservation, 205-206, 
551, 553 

Building 114 (Woodworking Shop) equipment preservat.on. 
587 

Marine Railway 11 demolition agreement, 249n688. 1147 

portal crane documentation requirements, 956 

Section 106 compliance reminders, 203, 205-207 
Aeolus, USS (ARC-3), 1184, 1196 
Aeolus. USS (ARL-42) See LST-310. USS (LST-310) 
African Americans 

Kalamazoo (Mich.) Mayor, 1201 

munitions units, 1100-1101 

Navy Yard employees, 1108 (see also Cnte, Allan Rohan) 

sailors, 141. 1113 



African Squadron, 1086 
AG-121 See Humboldt, USS (AVP-21) 
AG-122. See Matagorda, USS (AVP-22) 
"Agnes." See YD-35 (YD-35) 
AGSS-297. See Ling, USS (SS-297) 
Aide De Camp, USS (IX-224). 92 
Ailes, John W.. Ill, 480-481 
Air Force, U.S., 13 

aircraft rescue boat, 586 

guidance on Cold War historic properties, 376 
Air Pegasus. SeeTrenk Family LLC (Air Pegasus) 
Aircraft Refueling Boat Mk. II (No. 25298). 586, 916 
Airphoto (Firm), cover, 179 
AK Services, 263 
Alar Corp., 220, 746, 1145 
Alaska. USS (screw sloop), 1089. 1159. 1161 
Albany (NY), 435 
Albany. USS (CA-123 / CG-10) 

conversion to guided-missile cruiser, 151-152. 924, 955, 967. 
1125 

in Dry Dock 2, 152, 786 

in Dry Dock 4, 955, 967 

at North Wharf, 1068 

at Pier 5, 924, 954 

at Pier 7. 929 

at Pier 11, 942 
Albany Naval Air Station, 1137 
Albatross //(aka Patuxent. USS), 900 
Albert, Ronald H., 476 
Albion, Evelyn. 299 
Aldebaran. USS (AF-I0), 252, 1224 
Aldrich Co.. 437 

Alexandria Real Estate Equities (AREE), 534. 537 
Alfred 'Wolf. USS (DE-544), 1113, 1159 
Algeria, 1166 

Algiers, war on (1815), 22, 29, 1079 
Algiers (La), 12, 12n12 
Allen, M.A., 991 

Allen M. Sumner, USS (DD-692), 791 
Alligator, USS (schooner), 1080, 1159, 1161 
Alonzo B Reed, Inc., 673 
A.M. Meyerstein (firm), 953, 955 
AM-483 (AM-483) (aka Mercur, HRNLMS (A-856) / Onver- 

schrokken. HRNLMS (M-886). 903 
Amada (yacht) (aka YFB-81). 304, 1124 
Amarosa, Bob, 263 
AMB Fund III Boston, 1154 

Amberjack. USS (SS-522) (aka Ceara (S-14)), 1115. 1159. 1174 
Amelia Occasions, 226, 255, 426 

See also later name Historic Venues, Inc. 
America, USS (IX-41) (aka Camilla). 1088, 1191 
America, USS (aka Amerika) (Id. No 3006). 788. 852. 1043 
American Battlefield Protection Program, 15 
American Bridge Co., 72 
American Chimney Corp . 568 
American Cyanamid, 1100 
American Expeditionary Force. 12. 316 



American Hoist & Derrick Co 

portal crane contract, 957, 959. 961-964, 1108 (see also Portal 

Cranes 12, and 62-69) 
portal crane track construction contract, 467, 952. 1055. 1097 
American Industrial Radium & X-Ray Society See American So- 
ciety for Nondestructive Testing 
American Institute of Architects, 515, 850 
American Legion. USS (AP-35), 317 
American Revolution 

BNHP significant sites, 15, 194 
Boston's role in, 1 
Bunker Hill, Battle of (1775) 
in art. 1077 
British landing site, iii, 3, 15, 197, 360, 362, 446, 546. 

1077 
burning of Charlestown, 15, 1077 
commemorative plaques, 15. 197. 362, 446. 546, 1106. 

1117 
multi-media presentation about. 255 
in Navy Yard statement of significance, iii. 3. 360 
Paul Reveres landing site, 15 
American Revolution Bicentennial 

Battle of Bunker Hill sound-and-light show. 255 
interest in, 1 96 
preparation for. 198 
Queen Elizabeth Ms visit. 177, 1139 
visiting ships, 256 

Whites of Their Eyes presentation, 255 
American Robin. SS, 734 
The American Ship (journal), 547 
American Ship Building (firm), I171n17 

American Society for Nondestructive Testing (ASNT) (formerly 
American Industrial Radium & X-Ray Society), 482, 485. 
1107-1108. 1148 
American Society of Civil Engineers. 34, 361, 383 760 1139, 

1144 
American Wood Preservation Co , 55, 1091 
America's Cup, 260, 1088 
Amerika, SS See America. USS (aka Amenk.i) 
Ames Iron Works, 466 
Ammonoosuc. USS (steam frigate) (aka Iowa. USS). 57, 1088, 

1159 
Ammunition Lighter No 77IYE-17 / YK-234). 1098, 1173 
Ammunition Lighter No Z?(YE-23 / YF-235), 80, 1098. 1173 
ammunition lighters (Yl I See under service ci. id 
Amphitnte. USS (BM-2). 63 

Amtrak (aka National Railroad Passenger Corp ), 333 
Anacostia Naval Air Station 1083 
Anchor Building See Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - Num 

bered Buildings & Structures - 108 
Anchor Hoy & Tank (service crafi). 1084. 1173 
The Anchorage See Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - Num 
bered Buildings & Structures - 103 
USS (AP-66). 145 
>>n, A , 1126 
Anderson. Robert B . 824 

th 615 
Anderson Associates. 839 
Anderson Notter Finegold 



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Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



1245 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Andrew. John, 49 

Andrew, Prince (United Kingdom) (aka Duke of York), 262, 264, 

1152 
Andrews, Philip, 1104-1105 
Annapolis, USS (AGMR-1). See Gilbert Islands. USS (CVE-107 / 

AKV-39) 
Annual Publication of the Master Mechanics' and Foreman's As- 
sociation, Boston Naval Shipyard, 1221 
Anthony, William S., 1131 
Antietam, USS (CVS-36), 301, 734, 792, 797 
Anzio (Italy), 1167 
Apache, USS (SP-729), 921 
APc-55, USS (APc-55) (aka FT5, HMS), 1196 
APCA Harbor Seafood, 881, 1155 
Apia Harbor (Samoa), 58, 1090 
APL-11. USS (APL-11) (aka The New Yorker), 1115, 1164, 1164n13, 

1167 
APL-12. USS (APL-12) (aka Biltmore), 1115, 1164, 1164n13 
APL-13. USS (APL-13), 984, 1115, 1164 
APL-32. USS (APL-32) (aka Statler), 137, 139, 984, 1115, 1164, 

1164n13 
APL-33, USS (APL-33), 984. 1115, 1164 
APL-34, USS (APL-34), 1115, 1164 
APL-35. See Benewah, USS (APB-35 /APL-35 / IX-311) 
APL-36. See Colleton. USS (APB-36 / APL-36) 
APL-37. See Echols, USS (APB-37 /APL-37 / IX-504) 
APL-38, See Marlboro, USS (APB-38 / APL-38) 
APL-39. See Mercer, USS (APB-39 / IX-502 / APL-39) 
APL-40. See Nueces, USS (APL-40 / APB-40 / IX-503) 
Apprentice, USS (brig), 49, 1085, 1159 
Aquitama, HMS, 134, 790 
archeology 

agencies and programs 

Eastern Archeology Field Laboratory, 468 
North Atlantic Historic Preservation Center, 226 
Servicewide Archeological Inventory Program (SAIP), 361 

archival materials, 1182 

in BNHP Scope of Collection's Statement, 1175 

Charlestown (Mass.), 15nn20-21 

Charlestown Navy Yard 

archeological overview, recommendations for, 2, 8, 361, 

394 
archeological potential, ill, 3, 264, 360-361 

sub-surface drawings and, 1180 
The Architects' Collaborative (TAC), 617 
The Architectural Team, 481, 483, 504, 587-588 
/WD-76(ARD-16) (floating dry dock), 162, 175-176, 806 
ARE-79/96 Charlestown Navy Yard LLC, 534, 537, 1150 
AREE See Alexandria Real Estate Equities 
Argus (brig), 22 

Ariake (DD-183). See Heywood L Edwards, USS (DD-663) 
Anelli Construction Co., 592, 1124 
Aries. USS (AK-51) (aka John J. O'Hagan; Lake Geneva, USS). 

1196 
Aris, HS (A-74), 256 
Arizona, USS (BB-39). 82, 251 
ARL-10 See LST-1003, USS (LST-1003) 
ARL-11. See LSI -1036, USS (LST-1036) 
ARL-12. See Poseidon, USS (ARL-12) 
Arlington (Va.) 

Arlington House, 422 

Arlington National Cemetery, 1099 
Armed Forces Courier Service, 709 
Armed Forces Day, 253, 358, 1132-1133 
Armed Forces Examining & Entrance Station, 319 
Armed Services YMCA. See also Army & Navy YMCA 

in Building 150 (Constitution Inn & Fitness Center), 247, 271, 
608-609. 611 

in Building 190, 608 

in Charlestown City Sq , 608 

in Hoosac Stores No 1 & 2 (proposed). 244n629, 608 

on Parcel 150, 236, 241, 243-244, 608-609. 611, 1149 
Armstrong, Mrs. James, 44, 1192 
Army, U.S. 

See also Army Corps of Engineers; Army Reserve; Boston 
Army Base; Castle Island Terminal; Quartermaster 
General's Dept. 

archival materials, 1188, 1192 

arsenals, 13, 18, 363 (see also Watertown Arsenal) 

Barnes (Fargo) Building ownership, 279, 298, 323-324, 1 21 5 

BMIP land conveyance. 1148 

Board of Engineers of Fortifications. 178 

building numbering system. 314n129, 320, 415nD, 713 

at Charlestown Navy Yard, 18-19, 1078-1080, 1083 

Chief of Engineers, 29 

coastal fortifications, 658 

Cohasset Annex, 1100 

Cold War historic resources study, 376 

efficiency banner, 365 



Army, U.S. — Continued 

Marine units compared to, 365 

Medal of Honor recipients, 324, 1197 

Mexican War, 314 

officers, 239, 314, 316, 1197 

recruitment, 320, 324 

seal, 668 

Spanish-American War, 314 

vehicles, 320, 713 

watercraft 

amphibious ships, 257, 1193-1194 
cargo ships, 1199 
hospital ships. 1207, 1224 
transferred from the Navy, 83 
transferred to the Navy, 145, 578 
transport ships, 1224 
World War I, 316 
World War II 

anti-aircraft guns and personnel, 615, 623, 696-697 
hospital ships, 1207 

ports of embarkation, 314, 316-318, 317n145, 360, 362, 
362n13 
Army & Navy YMCA, 608, 994, 996 

See also Armed Services YMCA 
Army Corps of Engineers 

Boston Army Base land acquisition directive, 322 
Constitution. USS, barrier, 683 
construction projects, 297, 318 

DERP-FUDS demolition & remediation projects (see under 
Defense Environmental Restoration Program-Formerly 
Used Defense Sites) 
dredging, 6, 391, 943 
HAER documentation, 7, 249, 393, 834 
National Military Context study, 363 
New England Division, 306, 709, 1116 
recommendations for, 6-7, 391, 393 
Small Boat Docking Facility permit, 907 
Army Military History Institute 

Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States 
Massachusetts Commandery, 1192 
Army Reserve, US 

Barnes Building units, 324 
Hingham/Cohasset Center, 1100-1101 
South Boston Annex Building 28 Training Center 
current status, 353 
EDIC Claims, 334, 713, 1144, 1148 
EDIC easements, 334, 1147 
property description, 324n178, 334 
property transfer, 333, 337, 713, 1139, 1144, 1148 
vehicle maintenance shop, 713 
transportation unit, 250 
Army Transport Service, 314 

Aroostook, USS (CM-3) (aka Bunker Hill, SS), 82-83, 91 
Arthur, Russel L. 

"Apple Orchard" birthday party, 188, 437, 439 
assuming position of Shipyard Commander, 657, 993, 1134 
Evening Colors, 649 
Navy Yard closure, 180, 182 
pier demolition projects, 332, 876 
portrait, 1125 

in Stanley Steamer, 481, 610, 1013, 1041 
USS Constitution Maintenance & Repair facility opening, 465 
Arvek, USCG (WYP-165) (aka Triton), 144 
Ash Lighter No 7J(YA-13). 1097, 1173 
AshLighterNo 14 (YA-14 / YD-65 / YC-690), 1097, 1173 
ash lighters (YA). See under service craft 
Ashforth Co , 881 

Ashforth Paradigm Capital Advisors, 881 
Asiatic Squadron, 1089, 1161 
Asiatic Station, 1090 

ASNT See American Society for Nondestructive Testing 
Aspis (D-06). See Connor, USS (DD-582) 
Alka, USS (AGB-3) (aka Southwind, USCG). 1196 



ATL-301 SeeLST-301. USS (LST-: 

ATL-302. See LST-302. USS (LST-: 

ATL-303. See LST-303. USS (LST-: 

ATL-304. See LST-304. USS (LST-: 

ATL-305. See LST-305, USS (LST-: 

ATL-306. SeeLST-306. USS (LST-: 

ATL-307. See LST-307. USS (LST-: 

ATL-308. See LST-308. USS (LST-; 

ATL-309. See LST-309. USS (LST-: 

ATL-310 SeeLST-310, USS (LST-: 

Atlantic Fleet, 83, 1200 

Atlantic Marine Boston See former name Boston Ship Repair 

Atlantic Marine Holdings, 794, 1156 

Atlantic Reserve Fleet (16th Fleet) See under Navy, U.S. - Fleets 

Atlantic Works, 764, 772, 1095 

Atlas Car & Manufacturing Co., 975 

Atlas of the County of Suffolk. Massachusetts (Hopkins), 971 



T-301) 
T-302) 
T-303) 
T-304) 
T-305) 
T-306) 
T-307) 
T-308) 
T-309) 
T-310) 



ATO-20 See Sagamore. USS (tug) 

Atomic Energy Commission, 306, 330, 722-723 

Atshuler Moisey S . 836 

Alwalea (British transport ship), 766 

Au Bon Pain, 353, 715, 1061, 1070. 1145 

Augherton, George, 1126 

Austin, USS (LPD-4). 256 

auxiliary ships See under ships and other vessels 

AVB-2. SeeLST-1154, USS (LST-1154) 

Aviere (D-554). See Nicolson. USS (DD-442) 

Ayer (Mass.) 

Fort Devens. 323-324 

-B- 

B. Perini & Sons, 928 
Bache, USS (DDE-470), 931 
Back River, 1100 
Badger, Oscar C . 1090-1091 
Bailey. W.S., 991 

Bainbridge, USS (brig), 23. 1085, 1159, 1161 
Bainbridge. William. 1079 
archival materials. 1179 

on Board of Navy Commissioners, 29, 31, 31n69, 1080 
career overview, 1118 
Constitution. USS, command, 1079 
Independence, USS, command, 22 
Navy Yard conditions under, 16, 19, 446, 1078-1079 
Navy Yard improvements 
Boundary Wall, 740-741 
recommendations, 16, 19, 22 
Ropewalk, 43, 516, 1079 
Shiphouse, 16, 22, 22n48, 896, 1079 
portrait. 1079 

terms as Navy Yard Commandant, 1078-1081 
War of 1812, 22 
Baker, Frederick T, 1213 
Baker. Marion J.. 502 
Baldwin. George R . 31n72 
Baldwin, Howell. 501 
Baldwin, James F. 34n80, 761, 1081 
Baldwin, Loammi 

archival materials, xi, 1181, 1188. 1190-1192 
assistants (see also Baldwin. George R : Baldwin, James F.; 
Parns, Alexander; Sanger, William PS.) 
master plan (1828). 31n72 
Navy Yard Dry Dock 1. 34. 34n80. 38, 458, 760-761, 

1081 
Norfolk Dry Dock, 34, 34n80 
and Board of Navy Commissioners, 31, 34, 34n77 
Dry Dock 1 

construction, 34, 361. 458, 760-763, 1081 
design, xi, 34-35, 761 
offices, 474-475 
gate recommendation, 1012 
master plan (1828) 
canals, 33, 1016 
grid pattern, 6, 31, 391, 523 
preparation, 1081 
removal of structures, 1083 

Second Ave as "Main Avenue, " 31, 33,373, 1000, 1003- 
1004, 1010 
Navy Yard surveys. 31, 31n72, 34n77, 1080-1081 
Norfolk Dry Dock, 34, 34n80, 760-761, 1081 
portrait, 31 

significance of, 4, 31, 34, 361 
Baldwin. USS (DD-624), 302 
Ballou, James H., 177. 461 
Ballou's Pictorial Drawing-Room Companion. 20 
Baltimore (Md.) 

Constellation. USS. 175-176, 176n366 
ship conversions. 771 
shipbuilding, 41, 176n366 
Ted Williams Tunnel construction, 350-351 
Torsk. USS. 832 
Baltimore-ctass cruisers, 295, 798 
Bancroft, George. 1085 
Bangor (Wash), 15 

Bank of America Pavilion (formerly Harborhghts / FleetBoston / 
BankBoston / Bank of Boston Pavilion) 885-889 
Boston HarborWalk, 357, 880. 889 
design, 346, 885, 888-889 
impact on other buildings, 354, 727 
licensing, 345-346, 889, 1151 
location, 346. 349, 885. 889. 949 
name changes. 346, 346n333, 888 
opening, 1151 

relocation to Wharf 8. 343, 345-346. 355, 888, 1151 
as tourist attraction, 357-358 
Bank of Boston Pavilion See Bank of America Pavilion 



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Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1 244 = Volume 3 



1246 



Index 



BankBoston Pavilion. See Bank of America Pavilion 

Bannister, Samuel B., 418 

Bare Cove Park. See under Hingham (Mass.) 

Baring-Gould. Laura, 688 

Barkan Companies, 540 

Barker, Josiah, 22, 22n45, 22n47, 1079 

Barnard, Edward, 1077 

Bamegat. USS (AVP-10). 1197 

Barnes, John A., 111,324 

Barnes. USS (CVE-20), 149 

Barnes Building See South Boston (Mass ) - Fargo Building 

barracks ships. See under srnps and other vessels 

Barry, William W„ 991 

Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC), 15, 367, 384, 1101, 1137 

The Basilica, 247, 1147 

See also Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - Numbered 
Buildings & Structures - 106 
Basilica Associates, 530, 556, 1146-1147 
Basilica Associates I. See Basilica Associates 
Basilica Leasehold Condominium, 269, 556, 1147 
Basilica Realty Corp., 1150 
Bataan, USS (LHD-5), 878 
Batcheller, Oliver A., 419 
Bates. Levi, 456, 741, 980 
Bates. William A., 1213 
Bath (Me.). See also Bath Iron Works; Hyde Windlass 

shipyards, 1200 
Bath Iron Works, 138, 145, 771, 1092, 1135, 1160n4 
Baton Rouge (La.), 50 
Battles, Edward, 761-762 
Baxter, William J , 1047 
BayBank. 527 
Bayntun, Henry W, 1174 
Bayntun, HMS (BDE 1 / DE-1), 138, 806, 1108-1109, 1168, 

1168n14, 1174 
Bayonne (N.J.), 288, 301 
Bayonne Naval Dry Dock, 12-14, 1107 
Bazely, HMS (BDE 2 / DE-2). 138, 806. 1108-1109, 1168, 1168n14, 

1174 
BDE-1. See Bayntun, HMS (BDE 1 / DE-1) 
BDE-2 See Bazely. HMS (BDE 2 / DE-2) 
BDE-3 See Berry HMS (BDE-3) 
BDE-4 See Blackwood, HMS (BDE-4) 
BDE-5. See Evans, USS (BDE-5 / DE-5) 
BDE-6. See Wyffels. USS (DE-6 / BDE-6) (aka T'ai Kang / DE-21) 
BDE-7 See Gnswold. USS (BDE-7 / DE-7) 
BDE-8. See Steele, USS (BDE-8 / DE-8) 
BDE-9. See Carlson, USS (DE-9) 
BDE-10. See Bebas, USS (DE-10) 
BDE-11. SeeCrouter. USS (BDE-11 /DE-11) 
BDE-1 2. See Surges, HMS (BDE-1 2) 
Beacon Iron Works. 543 
Beacon Skansa Construction Co., 889 
Bearss. Edwin C. 

criticism of preservation guidelines, 213 

Navy Yard historic base map, 19, 369 

Navy Yard Historic Resource Study, 9n1 

on Navy Yard mythology, 22 

Navy Yard National Register nomination, 2, 385 
Beatty USS (DD-756). 855 
Bebas, USS (DE-10 / BDE-10). 1108-1109, 1159 
Bechtel/Parsons Brinckerhoff, 728 

See also Parsons, Klapp. Brinckerhoff & Douglas 
Beck. Jerry, 993 
Beeler, Ethan, 449 
Belmont Iron Works. 544 
Benedetto. Ernest, 1211 
Benewah, USS (APB-35 / APL-35 / IX-311) (aka Tulungan (AH-3)), 

137n291, 1115, 1159. 1174 
Benicia, USS (screw sloop), 1089 
Benner, USS (DE-551), 1115, 1159 

Bennett. USS (DD-473) (aka Paraiba (D-28)), 1109, 1159, 1174, 1176 
Bennion. USS (DD-652), 1112, 1159. 1165, 1181 
Benson, Robert W.I 211 
Benson-class destroyers, 1166 
Bentley.JamesA.,417.913 
Benton, Mrs Thomas, 1 53 
Benton, Thomas Hart, 1 53. 1099 
Berenson. Richard A . 426 
Bergen Point Iron Works, 575-576 
Bergeson, Lloyd, 334-335 
Bemacky Helen, 299 

Bernalillo County, USS (LST-306) See LST-306, USS (LST-306) 
Bernard Rolf (firm), 926, 1097 



Bernardo, Celeste, 1 20n258 

Berne (Switzerland). 1123 

Berry. HMS (BDE-3), 1108-1109, 1168, 1174 

Bethlehem Steel Co. 

See also Fore River Shipyard (Quinr.y. Mass ) 

archival materials, 1191 

Dry Dock 3 Caisson construction, 795 

East Boston shipyard, 125, 134 

Hingham Shipyard, 138, 146, 149 (see also later name 

Hingham Naval Industrial Reserve Shipyard) 
Hunters Point shipyard, 1108 (see also later name San Fran- 
cisco Naval Shipyard) 
San Pedro shipyard, 251, 1113 
Sparrows Point shipyard, 351 
6*6, USRC (aka Tyler). 1086, 1159, 1159n2 
"Big Dig." See Central Artery/Tunnel (CA/T) project 
Big Dig Diner, 342, 730, 883, 1150, 1154-1155 
Big Horn, USS (AO-45 / WAO-124 / IX-207), 145 
Bila (dog), 276 
Billfish. USS (SS-286). 303 
Billings, Joseph E 

appointment as Civil Engineer, 3, 37-38, 37n85, 367-368, 

1086 
career overview, 37n85 
design and construction 

architectural style, 267, 361, 485, 488, 496, 506, 509 
Building 24 (incorrectly attributed), 462 
Building 28, 466 
Building 32. 40, 474 

Building 33 (incorrectly attributed), 41, 478 
Building 34, 485 
Building 36, 40, 488 
Building 37, 40 
Building 38. 40, 267, 492 
Building 39, 40, 267, 496 
Building 40, 75, 506 
Building 42, 40, 187, 508-509 
Building 43, 40 
Building 47, 40 
Building 48, 40 
Building 49, 40 
Building 79, 531-532 
railroad tracks, 970 
Yarn Mill (proposed), 524 
FY 1856 report, 970 
FY 1857 report, 531 
FY 1863 report, 970 
FY 1864 report, 510 
FY 1865 report, 994 
offices, 471 

resignation as Civil Engineer, 1089 
Billings Building. See Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - Num- 
bered Buildings & Structures - 33 
Biltmore See APL-12, USS (APL-12) 
Binney, Amos, 434, 442, 456, 740-741 
BioLease Inc., 243, 530, 1149 
Birckholtz, Johannes, 1135 
Bird Island Flats, 318 

Bishop & Clerk's (lightship station), 1087, 1160n3, 1212 
Bismarck (German ship). See Majestic. RMS (passenger ship) 
bitts (posts), 1195 
Bivin, USS (DE-536), 1113, 1159 
Black, Richard E„ 1208 
Black Falcon, MV, 325, 1124 

Black Falcon Terminal. See Boston Army Base - Facilities - Num- 
bered Buildings & Structures - 10 
Blackford, William M., 1113 
Blackinton, Alton Hall "Boston Blackie," 92 
Blackwood, HMS (BDE-4), 1108-1109. 1168, 1174 
Blanke, Laurence M , Jr, iv 
Blue Belle Highlanders, 955 
Blyth, E„ 1126 

BMIP See Boston Marine Industrial Park 
Board of Navy Commissioners 
abolishment of, 1085 
archival materials, 1185 
Charlestown Navy Yard and 

1828 master plan, 31-33, 363, 516. 1081 

Boundary Wall. 582, 740-741, 1080 

Building 20, 1080 

Building 21. 456 

Building 22, 458 

Building 58, 516, 1084 

Building 63, 1081 

Building 64, 528, 1081 

Building 68, 1080-1081 

Building 71. 1080 

Building 73, 1084 

Building 75, 528 

Building 266, 434-435, 1080, 1084 

Dry Dock 1, 29, 33. 34n77, 35, 761, 1079 



Board of Navy Commissioners 

Charlestown Navy Yard and — Continued 
Guard House, 416 
l.indsi aping KJHO 

plan of buildings and machinery (1837), 1084 
Quay Wall, 1084 
seawall, 582 
Smithery O, 1080 
Structure 87, 1081 

Chelsea Naval Hospital, 1081-1082 

establishment of, 31, 1079 

industrial specialization concept, 11, 363 

President, 1080 (see also Bainbndge. William) 

reviews of navy yards, 29, 178, 363 

volunteer fire department order, 1080 
Boatworks Building See Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - 

Numbered Buildings & Structures - 114 
Boch, Ernie. 717. 728. 876 
bollards, 206, 1052, 1195 
Booth, Edward J , 502 
Booz, Allen & Hamilton, 332 
Bone, Adolph E. 1089 
Boston (Mass ) 

See also Charlestown (Mass.); Dorchester (Mass ); East 
Boston (Mass.); Port of Boston; South Boston (Mass.) 

African Meeting House. 688 

American Revolution. 1, 194 

Board of Zoning Appeals, 61 7 

Central Wharf, 221, 259, 1148 

Charlestown (Mass.). annexation of, ix, 1089 

City Hall, 358. 358n374, 1155-1156 

Copps Hill Burying Ground, 688 

Customs House, 278, 1167 

Easton Building, 224 

Exhibition & Convention Center, 344, 891 

Freedom Trail, 1009, 1027 

great molasses flood (1919). 578 

Institute of Contemporary Art, 258, 688, 993 

Interim Reuse Plan for the Navy Yard, 1137-1138 

Long Wharf, 222-223, 838, 919, 1147 

Lovejoy Wharf, 222-223, 1155 

Massachusetts State House, 37, 1192 

Mayor (see also Curley, James M.; Flynn, Raymond L ; Hynes, 
John B.; Menino, Thomas M . White, Kevin H.) 
EDIC board appointment responsibilities, 335 

Nashua St., 862, 868 

Navy Yard purchase proposal. 1138 

Navy Yard redevelopment plans, 231-234, 332-333, 1137- 
1139 

North Station, 27, 222-223, 816 

North Station Industrial Building (aka 150 Causeway Street). 
499, 1107, 1193 

Old North Church (aka Christ Church, Boston), 1078, 1139 

Old South Church (aka Old South Meeting Hall), 608, 688 

Old State House, 1139, 1188 

Parks & Recreation Dept.. 261n751 

Paul Revere House, 688 

South Station, 318. 837, 1099, 1155 

street furniture. 754-755. 837 

West End, 862, 868 

World War II Navy facilities map. 124 

youth boxing facility, 725 

Zoning Commission, 1148 
Boston People and Places program, 260-261 
Boston. USS (CAG-1) 

archival materials, 1181 

artwork onboard, 1080 

bell, 1154 

at Pier 11, 866, 944 

at South Boston Annex, 305, 874, 954 
Boston. USS (sloop-of-war). 1080, 1160. 1181 
Boston & Albany Railroad, 761 
Boston & Maine Railroad. 70n177. 747-748. 975 

See also Hoosac Docks Branch; Hoosac Stores No. 1 & 2 

boxcars. 227 
Boston Academy of Music, 225, 441, 1150. 1154 
Boston Army Base (aka 666 Summer St ; Boston Army Supply 
Base; U.S. Quartermaster Terminal). 314-323 

archival materials, 1186-1188 

Armed Forces Examining & Entrance Station, 319 

BMIP, incorporation into, 1144 

boundaries, 1062 

bus service, 318, 837, 1155 

closure (disestablishment). 305. 1131, 1134 

commanding officer (see Chin, Wah G) 

Constitution. USS, Bicentennial Salute, 1150 

construction, 316-317. 1102. 1104 

design, 315 

establishment, 314. 1062 

hazardous materials remediation. 248. 332 

historic significance 

Massachusetts Historical Commission inventory. 360n5 
National Historic Landmark nomination, 393 



Pages 1 -394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



1247 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Boston Army Base 

historic significance — Continued 

National Register criteria, 197, 333 

National Register documentation, 7, 393 

National Register recommendations, 279, 359-360, 362 
homeport proposal, 324-325, 1145 
land sales and transfers. 322-323 

Army declaration as surplus, 1131 

Army purchase of land for, 1102 

Army to GSA, 323 

Army to Navy, 171, 171n352, 314, 1134 

GSAtoEDIC, 322-323, 1145 

GSA to Government Land Bank, 333-334, 1148 

GSA to Massport, 322-323, 1148 

Navy declaration as surplus (1972), 314, 322. 1134 

Navy to Army. 314, 322-323, 1137-1138 
leases (see also specific buildings and parcels) 

Massport, 321. 324-325, 347 

Port of Boston Commission, 319, 319n158, 1124-1125 
Navy designation for, 1193 
Navy Operating Group, 318 
Port Battalions, 318 
public use, 358 
redevelopment, 341, 344-345, 346-347, 356, 1063, 1144 (see 

also specific buildings and parcels) 
Sail Boston events, 326, 358. 1149 
site plan 

1919, 280, 315 

1939, 979 

1970, 319 

1983, 322 

2000, 338 
South Boston Annex, incorporation into, 307, 313-314, 327 
streetcars, 318, 837 
Vietnam War protests, 319 
World War II, 124, 317, 317n145, 318, 362n13 
Boston Army Base - Facilities 
concrete structures, 282 

proximity to South Boston Annex, 149, 285, 291 
Numbered Buildings & Structures [Navy building numbers in 
brackets] 

Navy renumbering of, 314n129, 319 

1 1112) (Guard House), 314, 316, 319-320 

2 (Timekeepers Office), 316 

3 [1131 (Administration Building / Security Office), 314- 

316, 320, 344 

4 [114] (Storehouse / Boston Design Center / Bronstein 

Center) 
in 1968 consolidation plan, 314 
aboveground steam lines, 309 
Building 3, bridges to, 320 
Building 10, bridges to. 318, 321 
construction, repair, and improvements, 316 
Defense Dept. use of, 323 
disposition, 322 
location, 315, 789 
railroad tracks, 320, 979, 1063 
redevelopment, 326, 342, 344-345, 356, 1146-1147, 
1156 
Boston Design Center, 1146 
Bronstein Center, 326, 341n279, 1146, 1156 
EDIC-Massport "turf war," 347 
GSA sale to EDIC, 1145 
leases 

Army to Port of Boston Commission, 319, 

319n158 
to Cargo Ventures, 341n279 
EDIC to Boston Harbor Partners, 1 1 45-11 46 
EDIC to CV Dry Dock Avenue, 1155 
EDIC to DLJ-Hoffman Inc., 1145 
EDIC to Drydock Associates, 1147 
EDIC to New England Design Center, 1146 
parking, 1063 
size, 316, 320 
streets & roadways, 1060 
SUPSHIPS offices, 627 

5 [1151 (Substation), 313, 315-316, 320, 894, 951 

6 [11 61 (Power House) 

in 1968 consolidation plan, 313 
construction, repair, and improvements, 316 
disposition, 323 

location, 293, 315. 320, 789, 951 
redevelopment. 344, 356, 894-895. 1147 

7 [117] (North Pier Shed) 

in 1968 consolidation plan, 314 

berths served by. 321 

Building 8, bridges to. 321 

construction, repair, and improvements, 316 

demolition, 325, 356, 1151 

location, 315, 318 

redevelopment 
leases 

Army to Port of Boston Commission, 319 
Massport to EDIC, 347, 1144 



Boston Army Base - Facilities 

Numbered Buildings & Structures 

7 [117] 

redevelopment 

leases — Continued 

Massport to International Cargo Port-Boston, 
326, 1151 
Shipping Board, U.S. use of, 1104 

8 [1181 (South Pier Shed / International Cargo Port) 

in 1968 consolidation plan, 314 

berths served by, 321 

Building 7, bridges to, 321 

construction, repair, and improvements, 316 

location, 315, 318 

redevelopment 

Boston HarborWalk, 357 

International Cargo Port, 325-326, 341n279, 356, 

735, 837, 1151, 1154-1155 
leases 

Army to Port of Boston Commission. 319 
Massport to AMB Fund III Boston, 1154 
Massport to EDIC. 347, 1144 
Massport to International Cargo Port-Boston, 
326, 1151 
Shipping Board, U.S. use of, 1104 

9 (Fire Station), 316 

10 [1191 (Wharf Shed / Black Falcon Terminal) 
in 1968 consolidation plan, 314 

berths served by, 321 
Building 4, bridges to. 318. 321 
construction, repair, and improvements, 316 
location, 315, 320, 349 
redevelopment 

Black Falcon Terminal, 325-326 

Boston HarborWalk, 357 

bus service, 1155 

cruise ships, 355-356 

festivals and events, 358, 1150-1151 

opening of, 1146 

parking, 355 

proposed expansion, 326, 1155-1156 
lease, 319 
Shipping Board, U.S. use of, 1104 

11 [120] (Waiting Room), 314, 316, 319-321, 345, 356 

12 [1211 (Oil Pump House), 313 

14 [122] (Oil & Paint Shed), 313, 320, 951 

15 [1231 (Oil Tank), 320,951 

16 [124] (Oil Tank), 314, 320. 951 

17 [125] (Dike Wall), 951 

18 [126] (Gasoline Filling Station), 314 

19 [127] (Oil Storage Tanks), 313 

20 [128] (Treasury Scale), 314, 321 

21 [129] (Post Restaurant No. 2 / Liberty Lunch), 313- 

314, 317, 321 

24 [131] (Generator House), 313 

25 [132] (Oil Storage House), 313 

27 [1 33] (Forklift Truck Gas Station), 31 3 

28 [134] (Dispensary), 314, 318, 320-321. 344 
37 [135] (Ammunition Magazine), 313 

44 [136] (Flag Pole), 321 

45 [137] (Marine Repair Shop). 314. 320-321 

P-204 (Waterfront Service Buildings (3)) (proposed), 313 

P-205 (Consolidated Machine Shop) (proposed), 313 

P-206 (Consolidated Metal Working Shop) (proposed), 
313 

P-207 (EWP / Electrical Shop) (proposed), 313 

P-208 (Consolidated Waterfront Service Shop) (pro- 
posed), 313 

P-209 (Consolidated Foundry, Forge & Pattern Shop) (pro- 
posed), 313 

P-210 (Engineering / Management & Support Facility) 
(proposed). 313 

P-213 (Family Housing) (proposed), 314 

P-214 (Family Housing) (proposed), 314 

P-214 (Supply Administrative & Storage Facilities) (pro- 
posed), 313 

P-217 (Public Works Complex) (proposed), 313 

P-225 (Parking Structure) (proposed), 313 
Other Structures & Facilities [not numbered] 

laboratories, 484 

natural gas line, 706 

railroad system, 320, 326, 344, 712, 978-979 
Piers & Wharves 

cruise ship use, 326 

repairs to, 319 

Ted Williams Tunnel construction, 350, 358 

U.S. Shipping Board use, 1104 

Berth 1,321, 895 

Berth 2, 321, 895 

Berth 3, 321 

Berth 4, 321 

Berth 5, 321 

Berth 7, 321 

Berth 8, 321 

Berth 9, 321 



Boston Army Base - Facilities 
Piers & Wharfs — Continued 
Berth 10. 319. 319n158. 345 
Berth F, 325 1124 
Pier 10. 319, 344 
Shops 

Marine Repair Shop. 320 (see also Building 45) 
Streets & Roadways 

Black Falcon Ave , 837. 1060 
Terminal St 

bridges between buildings, 321 
bus service, 837 

connection to other roadways, 1060, 1074 
construction, 316 
Main Gate, 320 
name change. 331, 356, 1060 
South Boston Annex entrance, 331, 340 
Boston Army Supply Base See Boston Army Base 
Boston Athenaeum, 1187 

Boston Caretaker Group, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard 
Administrative Officer, 503 
archival materials, 1176, 1179 
closure of Navy Yard facilities, 571 
Constitution, USS, and, 202-203, 445, 961 
Director, 503 (see also Calarese, John B.; Norris, W.J ) 
disestablishment, 1139 
employee parking, 1007 
employees. 194 
establishment. 1138 

Navy Yard interim occupancy agreement, 335 
offices, 503 

responsibilities, 627, 1007 

surplus property removal, 194, 504, 571, 961, 1140 
visitor facilities, 203, 445 
Boston Cargo Terminal See South Boston Annex - Facilities - 

Parcels - M-1 
Boston Chamber of Commerce. 316 
Boston Chimney & Tower Co., 571 
Boston College 

John J. Burns Library, 1187 
Boston Concessions Group, 225, 258, 453, 1148 
Boston Conservation Commission, 907 
Boston Daily Advertiser. 1117 
Boston Daily Advertiser and Patriot, 34 

Boston Defense Area Nike Battery 167 Military Reservation. 1131 
Boston Design Center, 344, 346 
Boston Dry Dock Co., 125, 1109 
Boston Edison Co., 307, 565, 609, 704, 1128 
See also Edison Electric Illuminating Co. 
Boston Elevated Railway Co., 1155 

See also Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA); 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) 
Boston Fire Dept. 

fighting Ropewalk fire, 522 
Fire Fighting School. 299, 313 
Fire Prevention Parade. 503. 1006 
parking bans, 240 
responding to false alarm, 1075 
shipboard fire response, 1156 
training Navy Yard workers. 299 
Boston Fish Pier (Pier 6). See South Boston (Mass) - Fish Pier 

(Pier 6) 
Boston Freight Terminals, 341, 703, 872, 1150 
Boston Globe, 345-346, 933, 1187, 1209 
Boston Group, Atlantic Reserve Fleet See Navy, US - Fleets - 

Atlantic Reserve Fleet (16th Fleet) 
Boston Harbor 

archival materials, 1191 

Boston Marine Society advocacy, 178. 477 

Cassin Young. USS 

Commemorative Sea Trials. 250-252 
Chelsea Annex location, 123 
Constitution, USS. 174, 177, 276 
educational groups, 345, 345n314, 346 
filling of, 873 

harbor pilots, 226, 477. 577 
Navy Yard activities 

anti-submarine nets, 300, 699 
mooring dolphins, 318 
orientation to harbor, 56, 278, 376 
potential sites for, 1 5 
ship repair, trials and launches 
1900s, 80 
1930s. 108 
launching rails, 988 
small boats, 586 
submarines, 783 

World War II. 136, 139-140, 142-145. 296 1110. 
1165-1167 
plane crash. 1065 
pollution. 228, 243, 332, 596 
public access to waterfront, 260 ( see also Boston HarborWalk) 



Pages 1 -394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1 244 = Volume 3 



1248 



Index 



Boston Harbor — Continued 
public works projects, 281 
tides, 905 

transportation network, 222-223, 684 
tunnels (see Sumner Tunnel; Ted Williams Tunnel) 
War of 1812. 22 
Boston Harbor Associates (TBHA), 248, 260, 346, 357, 392 
Boston Harbor Commission, 920 
Boston Harbor Investment Group Inc., 534, 1148 
Boston Harbor Partners, 1145, 1155 
Boston Harbor Police, 951 
Boston Harbor Tugboat Muster, 253 
Boston HarborWalk, 357, 392 
creation, 260 

interpretative waysides, 7, 358, 393 
landscaping, 348, 880 
map, 392 

recommendations, 6-7, 358, 391-393 
by section 

Bank of America Pavilion, 357, 880 
Black Falcon Terminal, 357-358 
Building 114, 238 

Building 197 (Flagship Wharf), 617, 1054 
Dock Street, 392, 847. 850, 1052-1054 
HarborView at the Navy Yard. 847-848, 1054, 1156 
International Cargo Port, 357-358 
Legal Sea Foods. 357, 880, 882 
Marine Railway, 6, 391 
Parcel 4, 1054 
Parcel 4A, 847, 1054 
Parcel 7. 588, 868 
Parcel W, 889 
Pier 5, 925 
Pier 8, 937 
Pier 10 Park, 895 
Pier 11, 944 

Vent Building 6, 348, 357, 880 
Wharf 8, 358, 888 
Boston Herald-Traveler, 1187 

Boston Investment & Development Co. (BIDC), 572, 1146 
Boston Journal. 980-981 

Boston Landmarks Commission, 360, 360n5, 362, 552 
Boston Marine Industrial Park (BMIP), 336-346, 352-356 

See also Boston Army Base - Facilities; South Boston An- 
nex - Facilities 
adoption of name, 1138 
aerial photo, 349 
archival materials, 1188 

Bank of America Pavilion (see Bank of America Pavilion) 
Big Dig Diner (see Big Dig Diner) 
Boston Army Base property, 344-345 
Boston HarborWalk, 357 
conveyance of land to U.S. Army, 1148 
Designated Port Area (DPA), 345 
Economic Development Plan. 1139 
entrances. 340. 1064, 1147 
Environmental Impact Report, 1139 
Facilities (see South Boston Annex - Facilities) 
festivals and events, 723, 1151 
Industrial Job Training Center, 1139 
infill between West Jetty and Pier 4, 1145 
leases, 340, 1145, 1148 
master plan, 337, 345, 889, 1155 
offices, 870-871 
Parcels 

I (Building 114), 1145 
J (Building 114), 1147 

K (Coastal Cement), 326, 344-345, 892, 894, 895, 1146 
parking. 342, 890, 1148 
portal cranes, 956, 969 
proposed sale of, 1150 
public use, 358, 752 
reuse 

educational programs, 261 
industrial activities, 336, 339, 697-698 
non-water dependent uses, 344, 346 
options considered, 336-344 
vocational training, 342, 883, 1139, 1150 
water-dependent uses 
cement handling, 344 
freight handling, 336, 339-341, 355 
Massporf Marine Terminal (see South Boston Annex 

- Facilities - Parcels - M-1) 
seafood processing, 342-344, 700, 881-882, 890- 

891 
shipbuilding and repair, 336-337 
signage, 340 
site plan (2000). 338 

Ted Williams Tunnel easements, 350. 879, 1148 
visiting ships, 358 
Boston Marine Society (formerly Friendship Club), 477 
Boston Harbor advocacy. 178. 477 
charter, 477, 1077 



Boston Marine Society — Continued 
establishment, 226, 477, 1077 
harbor pilot oversight, 226, 477 
lease, 1145 

meeting room and library, 267, 476-477 
mural, 477 

offices and museum. 215, 258, 266, 476-477 
opposition to proposed Newport Navy Yard. 1 78 
signage, 476 
Boston Molasses Co. 
South Boston Annex 

demolition of structures. 288, 291, 702, 869, 871 

reuse of buildings, 288, 291, 294, 702, 869 
South Boston waterfront lease, 279-280, 282, 282n14, 291, 

702, 869 
storage tanks, 288, 291, 702, 869 
Boston National Historic Sites (proposed), 198, 1134 
Boston National Historic Sites Commission, 196 
Boston National Historical Park (BNHP) 
Administration Division, 224-225, 579 
Advisory Commission, 215 
Agreement to Exchange Real Property, 219, 1144 
archival materials concerning, 1182, 1190 
Archives, 1175-1182 

finding aids, 1175 

recommendations, 8, 394 

Boston Naval Shipyard Oral History Project, 8, 1175-1176 

Boston Naval Shipyard Photo Collection, ix, 8, 394, 1176- 
1178 

Boston Naval Shipyard Reference ("Vertical") Files, 1181 

Boston Naval Shipyard Related Collections (RG 2), 8, 
1179 

Chain Forge Documents (K. Mitchell Collection), 1179 

Deed Files. 1181 

Files of Cape Cod National Seashore Relating to New 
Area Study for Boston Naval Shipyard, 1181 

Files Relating to Boston Naval Shipyard NHL Boundary 
Study, 1181 

First Naval District Papers, 1179 

Frederick Cobb Russell Papers (1862-65), 1179 

Joseph T Ogden Papers (1919-85), 1179 

Master Mechanics' and Foreman's Association (1938- 
70), 1179 

Museum Collection, 1182 

Navy Agent In Boston Papers (1830-33), 1179 

Park History Files, 1181-1182 

Records of the Boston Naval Shipyard (RG 1), 8, 1176, 
1179 

Records of USS Cassm Young (DD-793) (RG 3), 1181 

Ropewalk Collection (D.Himmelfarb Collection), 1179, 
1181 

Section 106 Case Files, 1182 

Ship Records, 1181 

Stewart James Park Papers (1822-36), 1181 

Sub-Surface Drawings, 1180 

Technical Information Collection, 1182 

USS Cassin Young Operational Records (1941-1978), 
1181 

Yeoman(F) Collections. 1181 
Artists-ln-Residence program, 688, 993 
authorization for (see Boston National Historical Park Act 

(1974)) 
boundaries 

component parts, 194, 196, 1138, 1145 

fence, 203, 818, 1008, 1014, 1048, 1139 

original boundaries, 195, 199, 245, 245n638, 811 

parcels included, 203-205, 205n450 

recommended expansion (1978), 199, 201 

revisions (1980). 199, 1145 

revisions (2009), 1157 
The Broadside, 1152-1153, 1159, 1182 
Collection Management Plan (CMP), 8, 394, 1175 
Colors (flag raising and lowering), 649 
Constitution, USS, Bicentennial Salute, 1152-1153 
Cultural Resources Division, 561, 1148, 1181-1182 (see also 

Planning & Historic Preservation Division) 
Curatorial Branch, 224, 601 
establishment. 194, 196-203 
Facilities (see also Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities) 

employee housing. 421, 1145 

rehabilitation projects, 226-231 
Facilities Manager (see Rose, David A.) 
General Management Plan (1980, revised 1987). 215 

approval of, 1145, 1147 

Building 10 food concessions, 453 

Building 28 as USS Constitution Museum expansion, 468 

Building 109 use for nonprofit Co-op activities, 579 

Building 125 as Navy Yard history exhibit, 601 

Commandant's House as function space. 426 

Marine Railway as exhibit in place. 834 

Preservation Subzone, 1, 215, 381, 1000 

revisions (current). 1. 8. 394 

site plan, 214, 216 
ground maintenance staff, 651 



Boston National Historical Park (BNHP) — Continued 
headguarters, 18, 1033, 1193 
Historical Architect, 224. 426, 453 
industrial character, 380 
Interpretation Division, 224, 421. 579, 1154 
lease agreements 

Boston Concessions Group (Building 10), 225 

Boston Marine Society (Building 32), 1145 

Historic Venues, Inc. (Commandant's House Grounds), 
759 

USS Constitution Museum (Building 22), 461n1 
Maintenance Division, 224-225, 560-561, 579, 1147 
Museum Collection. 206, 225. 503, 1091 

archival materials, 1176, 1182-1184 
National Register documentation, 7, 393 
offices, 224-225, 453 
Planning & Historic Preservation Division, 224, 453, 579 (see 

also Cultural Resources Division) 
Protection Division, 221, 224, 455. 579, 660, 1155 
Public Affairs Officer (see Hennessey, Sean) 
purpose, 194 
recommendations for, 5-8, 391-394 

administrative history documentation, 8, 394 

interpretive waysides, 5, 7, 393 

Navy Yard master plan, 5 

review of boundaries, 5, 383, 1239 
Scope of Collections Statement (SOCS), 8, 394, 1175 
security 

Constitution, USS (see Constitution, USS - security) 

lighting, 276 

for Navy personnel, 276, 378-379, 685 

terrorism, response to. 264, 276, 814, 1154 

vehicle access, 262, 264. 276, 681, 814 

visiting dignitaries, 262 

visiting ships. 262, 276, 1150 

visitor screening, 264, 276, 685 
site plan (existing conditions), 1241-1243 
Superintendent, 5, 1138. 1146, 1148, 1154 [see also 
Brouillette. David R., Burchill, John J.; Gurney. Hugh 
D., Savage, Terry W ; Steele, Peter) 
Superintendent's Office. 224 
tenants, 225-226 
Visiting Ships Program, 256-257 

facilities. 691 

overview, 254 

security, 262, 276, 683, 1150 
visitor services 

accessibility features, 228, 231. 677, 905 

Building 5 visitor center. 255 

exhibits. 5. 255, 258-259, 382, 449, 600-601. 1130, 

1183 
opening, 1156 
refurbishment as, 231 
security, 449, 826 

Bunker Hill Pavilion visitor center, 255, 449, 824, 1150 

bus transportation, 223-224 

educational programs, 260-261 

exhibits, 255, 258, 601 

festivals and events, 253-255 

food services, 258-259, 677 

improvements, 255, 258-260 

interpretive waysides, 393 

parking, 223, 824 

pedestrian access, 824 

site interpretation, 1, 258 

water transportation, 684, 904-905, 919, 1156-1157 
Boston National Historical Park Act (1974), 194-196, 225. 360n6, 

381. 1138 
Boston Naval Shipyard Employee Cooperative Association, 490, 

1125 
Boston Naval Shipyard National Historic Landmark 
boundaries 

archival materials, 1181 

current boundaries, 359, 395 

review (proposed), 1239 

revisions (proposed), 7. 279, 359-362. 393 
certificate, 196 

contributing features, 363, 376, 378, 395-396, 958 
criteria, 361-362 

designation, 3-4, 170, 196-197, 359. 1134 
documentation, 359 
existing conditions, 380, 1239-1243 
Navy recommendations, 197 
nomination form, 359, 359n1 
plaque, 170, 197, 657 

preservation and development guidelines, 203, 213, 215. 515, 
958 
Boston Naval Shipyard National Historic Site (proposed). 1137 
Boston Naval Shipyard News (aka Boston Navy Yard News) 
archival materials, 8, 394, II 76, 1179 
articles 

Allan Rohan Cnte's book, 1129 

Armed Forces Day open houses. 1132 

first female welder. 1108 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1 244 = Volume 3 



1249 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Boston Naval Shipyard News (aka Boston Navy Yard News) 
articles — Continued 

historical review of Navy Yard, 1137-1138 

Navy Yard community news, 1127 

Pier 11, 941-942 

Portal Crane 63 relocation, 957 
cartoons 

"ABC's of B.N.S.", 1117-1123 

shipyard campaigns and special events, 1130 

"The Yard Bird," 1225 

"The Yardbirds," 1117, 1225 
drawings 

Gate 4, 818 

promoting shipyard cleanup, 600 

USS Constitution Gate, 825 
features 

cafeteria menu, 490 

obituaries, 1107 
final issue, 1137-1138 
first issue, 1106 
photos 

Allan Rohan Cnte, 1129 

Antietam, USS. in Dry Dock 3, 792 

in BNHP archives, 1177 

Building 58 (Ropewalk), 520 

Building 105 plaque, 546 

Building 108 chimneys, 571 

fire departmenl equipment, 1035 

Marine Parade Ground snowman, 829 

railroad tracks, 1039 

Safety Shoe sign, 655 

Shipyard Mall, 992 

Structure 282 (Marine Barracks Torii Gate), 675 

V-J Day, 1115 

white collar workers, 501 
purpose, 1106, 1127 
seal design contest, xn 
staff, 502 
Boston Navy Yard. See Charlestown Navy Yard 
Boston Navy Yard News See Boston Naval Shipyard News 
Boston Pilot Commissioners, 226, 477 
Boston Police Department, 951 

Boston Port Service, 347n347, 717, 728, 876-877, 1146 
Boston Post. 874 
Boston Public Library, 1187-1188 
Print Department, 1187 

Boston Pictorial Archive, 1187 

Leslie Jones Collection, 1187 
Rare Book Department, 1188 

Richard D. Harris Papers (1820-1840), 1188 
Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) 

Agreement to Exchange Real Property, 219, 1144 

archival materials, 1182, 1188, 1190-1192 

Charlestown Navy Yard Re-Use Study, 1 1 34 

chief senior architect, 997 

coordination with NPS, 5, 383 

director (see Coyle, Stephen; Kenney, Robert T. ; Maloney, 

Mark; Walsh, Robert F.) 
disposition parcels 

Immobiliare New England agreement, 1144, 1148 

Parcel 1A1 to Flagship Wharf Realty Trust, 1147 

Parcel 2A1 to Building 42 Associates, 1028, 1145 

Parcel 3B to Immobiliare New England, 1145 

Parcel 31 to Bricklayers & Carpenters Charlestown Non- 
profit Development Corp., 1149 

Parcel 4A-1 to Bricklayers & Laborers Non-Profit Hous- 
ing Co., 1147 

Parcels 2C, 3D to Shipyard Quarters Trust. 1145 

Pier 6 (Parcels 1B1, 2B. 2B1) to Shipyard Manna Trust, 
1145 

site plan (1978), 204 

summary table (1979-2005), 237 
E DIC merger. 336, 1149, 1204 
Environmental Impact Report, 1139 
Harborpark Day, 253 
lease agreements 

conditions, 205, 236 

deed of release, 219n510 

developer entities, 236n595 

filings with Suffolk County, 236n595, 237 

Historic Monument Area, 237 

preservation guidelines, adherence to, 5. 383 

summary table, 237 

transfers. 236, 236n597 

Basilica Associates I (Building 106). 556, 1147 

BioLease Inc. (Building 75), 530, 1149 

Boston Harbor Investment Group Inc. (Building 79), 534, 
1148 

Building 33 LLC (Building 33). 481 

Building 38 Ventures LP (Building 38). 495 

Building 62 LP (Building 62), 527, 1147 

Building 79 Associates (Building 79), 534, 537 

Building 96 Associates (Building 96), 537, 1147 

Building P Associates (Quarters P), 439, 1149 



Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) 
lease agreements — Continued 

Conroy-Heafitz Development Team (Building 266), 437 

Constitution Office Park Associates (Building 149), 606 

Incubator Associates (Building 36), 491 

James A. McGowan (Building 33), 481 

Joinery Shop Associates (Building 114), 587. 1147 

Massachusetts Biomedical Research Corp. (Building 75), 

530 
Massachusetts Biomedical Research Corp (Building 

149), 607, 624 
Massachusetts Industrial Finance Agency (Building 1 99), 

624 
MGH Institute of Health Professions (Building 36), 491 
MGH Professional Services Corp. (Building 62), 527 
MJC Realty Trust (Building 31), 473, 1150 
Nantucket Development Corp (Building 38), 495 
Navy Yard Parking Associates (Building 199), 624 
Navy Yard Plaza Development Associates-33 (Building 

33), 1147 
Navy Yard Plaza Development Associates-38 (Building 

38), 494-495, 1147 
Navy Yard Plaza Development Associates-39 (Building 

39), 504, 1147 
Parcel 150 Associates Joint Venture (Parcel 150), 611, 

1148 
Royalston Trust (Building 31), 473 
legal obligations, 5n12 

Massachusetts Executive Office of Transportation grant, 11 56 
Navy Yard redevelopment, 231-246 (see also specific facili- 
ties under Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities) 
BRA-NPS boundary line, 818. 1048 
Charlestown Navy Yard Pier Management Plan. 1149 
Courageous Sailing Center, licensing of, 261n751 
demolition as urban renewal, 811 
existing conditions, 380 
groundbreaking, 1144 
HAER documentation, 7, 393, 485, 487 
Harborpark proposal, 260, 1054 
HarborView project, 848, 1156 
hazardous materials remediation, 1149 
Historic Monument Area (see under Charlestown Navy 

Yard) 
historic park proposal, 197-198 
industrial activity reuse, abandonment of, 1138 
John F. Kennedy Library proposals, 233-234, 259, 1138 
marina development, 839-840 
master plan (see Charlestown Navy Yard - BRA master 

plan) 
New Development Area (see under Charlestown Navy 

Yard) 
preservation and development guidelines, 213 
public park application, 1138 

Shipyard Park (Recreation Parcel) (see under Charles- 
town Navy Yard - Facilities - Other Structures & 
Facilities) 
visitor attraction plans. 259 
water shuttle, 222. 838 
offices, 225, 453, 476. 1139 
oversight of, 248 

recommendations for, 5-8, 391-394 
South Boston Annex redevelopment 

Bank of America Pavilion proposal, 346 
Boston Cargo Terminal Project, 878, 1156 
transfer of property to, 205 

Waterfront Activation Network Plan (see Waterfront Activa- 
tion Plan) 
Boston Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad, 123 
Boston Sand & Gravel, 698, 1150 
Boston Seafood Distribution Center, 1150 
Boston Seaport Boat Charters, 885, 887-888, 888n1 

See also former name AC. Cruise Lines 
Boston Seaport Festival, 253, 1149, 1151 
Boston Ship Repair (aka Atlantic Marine Boston) 
Crews Head (Building 22), 353, 710 
Dry Dock 3 lease. 337. 339, 709-711. 793-794, 963, 1150 
employees, 752, 796 
kickback scandal, 337. 794, 1156 
name change, 337n267, 1156 
North Jetty use, 877 
offices, 693 

Philadelphia facilities. 337 
portal crane use, 961, 963 

vessels repaired by, 337. 339, 734. 794. 796, 1156 
Boston Shipbuilding Corp , 233. 334-335, 997, 1137-1138 
Boston Streetline series, 754-755 
Boston Sunday Herald, 1 78 
Boston Technical Center, 342, 721 
Boston Thermal Cogeneration Corp.. 341. 891, 1148 
Boston Thermo King, 354, 725 
Boston University, 260 
The Bostonian Society 

Arthur Hansen Photograph Collection 1188 



The Bostonian Society — Continued 

Charlestown Navy Yard Reports (1843-1853), 1188 

Donald LaPointe Photograph Collection (1923-1936) 1188 

Illustrated Boston Lantern Slide collection (1888), 1188 

Letters and Testimonials of George W Burroughs (1871- 
1923), 1188 
Boucher, Jack E , 7, 207, 211, 393, 956 
Bounty, HMS (replica ship), 253 
Bouteiller, G.L., 481 

Boxer, USS (schooner), 1081, 1122, 1160 
Boyle, Doris L, 1021 
Boylston, Richard, 1077 
BRA See Boston Redevelopment Authority 
BRAC See Base Realignment and Closure 
Brad Foote Gear Works, 787 
Bradford, S Sydney, 196 
Bradley, Gilbert H„ 1200-1201 
Branch, John, 178 
Brand, Charles L. 1107 

building design, 187, 486, 544, 1107 

at Philadelphia Navy Yard, 288n28 

portrait, 1107 

as Shipyard Manager, 187. 283, 288n28, 1107 

on World War II Navy Yard development board, 283 
Brantevik (Sweden), 760 
Braswell Shipyards 

bankruptcy and closure. 337, 800, 1144 

Dry Dock 4 lease, 336-337, 727, 800-801, 1138 

offices, 727 

parking and storage, 884 

portal crane use, 967 

vessel repair, 801 
Brazil 

vessels transferred to. 1159, 1163, 1174 
Brazos, USS (AO-4), 81-82, 282, 983. 1104. 1160 
Breed's Hill. See under Charlestown (Mass.) 
Brennan, Thomas P.. 1213 
Bres. John H., 1200-1201 
Breslin, Mane, 1226 
Brian R. Skerry Memorial Park See under South Boston Annex - 

Facilities - Other Structures & Facilities 
Bricklayers & Carpenters Charlestown Non-Profit Development 

Corp.. 1149 
Bricklayers & Carpenters Charlestown Non-Profit Housing Corp., 

544-545 
Bricklayers & Laborers Non-Profit Housing Corp ., 849, 1147-1148 
Bricklayers Union. 247 
Bridge. USS (AF-1) 

construction, 81. 981, 983. 1099. 1222 

keel-laying ceremony, 82, 1102 

launch, 82, 1102 

in list of ships built by Navy Yard, 1160 
bridge cranes. 549, 555, 845. 1195 
Bridgeport, USS (Id.No. 3009), 921 
Bridgewater Iron Manufacturing Co., 761 
Brilliant (LV-4). See Light Vessel No 4 
Bnstol-dass destroyers, 1165 
Britain See Great Britain 
Britannia. HMY, 254, 256, 262, 264, 1139, 1150 
British Airways World Cargo, 340-341, 872 
Brockett, William A , 180. 1125, 1128 
Brodhead, Daniel Dodge, 516, 1179, 1189 
Bromfield Corp., 784-785, 1128 
Bronson. USS (DD-868), 953 
Bronstein Center See Boston Army Base - Facilities - Numbered 

Buildings & Structures - 4 1114] 
Brookline (Mass.) 

Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site. 226 
Brooklyn Navy Yard See New York Naval Shipyard 
Brooks, Chester L., 199 
Brooks, John, Jr., 827 
Brooks. WB .. 501 
Brouillette, David R , 1157 
Brown, Joseph Vincent, 1191 
Brown, Maurice C, 502 
Brown, Samuel, 16. 422. 1078 
Brown, William R , 418 
Brown, Wilson, Jr., 1109 
Brown & Rowe, 998 
Bruff, J G , 36 
Bryant, Gridley, 761 
Buck. USS (DD-420), 766 
Buckley Mane, 147 
Buckley. USS (DE-51), 791 
Buckmaster, R W 1126 
Buffalo Dry Dock. 11 71 nl 7 
Builders Iron Works, 813 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1 077-1 244 = Volume 3 



1250 



Index 



Building 33 LLC. 439, 481, 1151 

Building 33 Realty Trust, 1149 

Building 38 Ventures LP. 495, 1150. 1156 

Building 42 Associates, 515, 1028, 1144 

Building 62 Corp., 1149 

Building 62 LP, 527, 1147 

Building 79 Associates, 534, 1148 

Building 96 Associates, 537, 1148 

Building 103 Associates, 540, 1146 

Building 104 LP, 544, 1149 

Building 106 LP, 1149 

Building P Associates, 439, 1149 

Bullfinch, Charles, 43n128, 422 

Bulwark, USS (AMc-68). See Joseph J Luna, MV (aka Bulwark, 

USS) 
Bunker Hill, Battle of- See under American Revolution 
Bunker Hill, SS. See Aroostook. USS (CM-3) 
Bunker Hill, USS (CG-52), 254 
Bunker Hill Day Parade, 27, 421, 448, 741, 1127 
Bunker Hill Monument, See under Charlestown (Mass) 
Bunker Hill Pavilion (Navy Yard Visitor Center), 255, 444 
Bunker Hill Yacht Club, 583, 748 
Burchill, John J., 224, 1146, 1148, 1151, 1181 
Bureau of Construction & Repair, 426. 467, 549, 598, 1182 
Bureau of Customs, 321 
Bureau of Engineering, 1182 
Bureau of Equipment, 549, 1182 
Bureau of Fisheries, 900 
Bureau of Navigation, 1110 
Bureau of Ordnance, 474, 1083, 1110, 1122 
Bureau of Outdoor Recreation, 1139 
Bureau of Public Roads, 217 
Bureau of Ships 

archival materials, 1176. 1182 
Chief, 180 (see also Brockett, William A.) 
Navy Yard projects, 48, 616, 1111 
officers (seeMarron, Adrian R.) 
ship christening documentation, 1111, 1174 
ships "in stream" documentation, 1165, 1196 
South Boston Annex disposition. 305 
Bureau of Supplies & Accounts, 602 
Bureau of Yards & Docks 

archival materials, 1185-1186 
building design 

common building designs, 11. 74, 598, 696 

general storehouses, 85, 364 
Charlestown Navy Yard, 621 
design description, 602 
development of, 288 
Kahn's contributions to, 85n219 
South Boston Annex, 696, 718 

industrial shops, 70 

machine shops, 288 

pump houses, 594 
Charlestown Navy Yard annual reports to, 51 
Charlestown Navy Yard projects 

analysis of Navy Yard activities, 123 

Building 1 (Gate House / Garages), 440 

Building 22 addition, 1089 

Building 24. 462-463 

Building 28 authorization, 1089 

Building 29 relocation. 1087 

Building 31, 470-471 

Building 38, 492 

Building 39, 497 

Building 40. 506 

Building 42, 508 

Building 75, 528 

Building 79, 531 

Building 97 (Main Gate), 661 

Building 105, 549 

Building 123, 594 

Building 125, 598 

Building 149, 602 

Building 197, 616 

Dry Dock 5, 806 

First Ave., 1004 

fuel oil tanks, 859 

Gate 1.811 

Gate 4. 471. 816 

Marine Barracks (Quarters I), 431 

Marine Railway 11, 830 

Pier 4 approval. 920 

Pier 5 approval, 920 

power plant consolidation, 564 

Quarters G, 423, 425 

Quarters P. 439 

railroad tracks, 970 

Shear Wharf. 897 

Shipways 1 , 980 

Structure 289, 682 



Bureau of Yards & Docks — Continued 

Chief, 897 (see also Smith, Joseph) 

marine railways, construction of, 830 

navy yard histories, commissioning of, 59 

power plant consolidation, 564 

Public Works of the Navy, 980 

recommended study of, 363 

South Boston Annex excess property list, 305 

steam engine facilities, 508 
Burges. HMS (BDE-12), 1108. 1112. 1168, 1174 
Burk, Raymond W. 

Change of Command ceremony, 993, 1199 

Navy Yard disestablishment, 182 

Navy Yard ropemaking, 48 

portrait, 1125 

ship transfer ceremony, 1135 

as Shipyard Commander, 48, 182, 314. 1125. 1134-1135 

transfer of Boston Army Base to Navy. 314 
Burke, Julian T., Jr., 1200 
Burnett, Calvin, 1108 
Burroughs, George W., 1188, 1210. 1213 
Bum, Arthur Morton, 541 
bus transportation 

Black Falcon Terminal, 1155 

Boston Army Base, 837. 1155 

Boston Marine Industrial Park, 837 

Boston National Historical Park, 224 

bus stop shelters, 312, 676, 837, 883 

Charlestown Navy Yard, 223-224, 303, 676, 1030, 1150 

historical, 1055 

International Cargo Port, 837, 1155 

Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA), 223, 
676, 837, 1150, 1155 

Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA), 223 

National Park Service (NPS), 223 

Partners HealthCare, 223 

security restrictions, 1030 

shuttle buses, 223 

South Boston, 837, 837 

South Boston Annex, 303, 312, 837, 883 

South Station, 837. 1155 

tour buses, 224, 812, 1059 
Bush, Gerald W , 335 
Butler, Benjamin Franklin, 1088 
Butner, Henry W, 1197 
Buy Parcel. See Charlestown Navy Yard - New Development Area 

(aka Buy Parcel) 
Buzzards Bay (Mass.), 771 
Byrd, Richard E„ 460, 483 
Byrd Second Antarctic Expedition, 483 



•C- 



C-47 (aircraft). 318 

C-4315 (motor whale boat), 807 

CA/T. See Central Artery/Tunnel (CA/T) project 

Cabana, USS (DE-260), 1112, 1160 

Cadmus. USS (AR-14), 735 

Cagney, James, 1112 

Caisson Barge No 7747(YC 1147), 1173, 1173n1 

Caisson Barge No 774S(YC-1148). 1173, 1173n1 

caisson barges (YC). See under service craft 

Calahoosahatchee, USS (AO-98), 149 

Calarese. John B., 305, 503, 1138 

Calcaterra, USS (DER-390), 929 

California 

periods of significance, 367 

study of military facilities in, 369 

US acquisition of, 11 
Callahan, William F., 626 
Calvano. C.N.. 834 

Cambridge Electron Accelerator, 722-723 
Camilla. See America, USS (IX-41) (aka Camilla) 
Campbell, William, 1213 
CANA See Central Artery North Area Project 
Canada See also Parks Canada 

armed forces recruitment sign, 603 

cruise ships, 326 

shipyard, definition of, 369 

training carl. 911 

visiting ships from, 256-257 
Canandaigua, USS (screw sloop) (aka Detroit. USS), 1087, 1160 
Canfield. USS (DE-262), 1112, 1160 
cannons 

as bollards, 206, 1052 

Constitution, USS, 183. 449. 753, 993 

display, 18, 102, 828-829 

excavation of cannonballs. 1041 
Canopus Inc . 985 



Cape Cod Canal, 771 

Cape Cod National Seashore, 1181 

Cape Elizabeth (Me), 1178 

CapeJuby. MV (T-AK 5077), 351. 947 

Capel. HMS (K 470) See Wmtlc, USS (DE-266) 

Capclla, USNS (T-AKR-293), 794 

capstans, electric, 1198 

See also under Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - Dry 
Docks; South Boston Annex - Facilities - Dry Docks 
Captain's Quarters LP, 1146 
Captains Quarters office complex. See Charlestown Navy Yard - 

Facilities - Numbered Buildings & Structures - 266 
careening (heaving down), 33, 761 
Cargo Ventures, 326, 341, 341n279, 703, 872, 1156 

See also International Cargo Center of New England 
Caribbean Sea, 314, 1206 
Carle, Barry, 657 
Carleton, Osgood. 16-17, 1078 
Carlson, USS (DE-9 / BDE-9), 1108-1109. 1160 
CarlyleCQ Boston LP, 515, 1154-1155 
Carnevali, Adele, 501 

Carol R. Johnson Associates, 229, 355, 752 
Carolan, Jane, 2 
Carpathia, RMS, 451 
Carpellotti, USS (DE-548), 1115, 1160 
Carpenter, J.S., 991 
Carr, John, 1211 

Carriage Building. See Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - Num- 
bered Buildings & Structures - 39 
Carroll, Sandra M„ 501 
Carter, Varnie, 226, 774 
Cascade, USS (AD-16), 1196 
CASDO. See Computer Applications Support & Development 

Office 
Case, USS (DD-370), 108. 782, 1106. 1121, 1160 
Casendino, Anthony, 572, 985 
Cassin Young, USS (DD-793), 250-252, 774 

archival materials. 8. 1175-1176. 1181 

Commemorative Sea Trials, 250-252, 261, 690, 1147 

commissioning, 1113 

decommissioning, 1115, 1128 

educational programs, 260 

guided tours, 258 

historic furnishings, 960 

historical association with the Navy Yard, 3 

launch, 1113 

maintenance and repair 

Building M-40 Workshop, 690 

hull repairs (2009-2010), 261, 1157 

modernization (1958), 303, 790. 1128 

overhaul (1957), 1125 

restoration (1979-1981), 261, 263. 770. 777, 960, 1144 

SCB-74A modernization (1952-1953), 150, 1124 

as museum ship, 770, 903, 1139, 1144-1145 

National Historic Landmark designation, 250-251, 360, 1146 

National Register documentation, 7, 393 

in naval memorial (proposed), 1138 

Naval Vessel Register, removal from, 1138 

Navy Yard Workers Reunion. 1151 

officers. 480n1 

Pier 1 berth, 688, 690, 903, 1157 

Pier 2 berth, 911 

radar equipment, 1217 

recommissioning, 1124 

safety (exclusion) zone, 276n769, 1149 

stage productions. 254, 1154 

underway replenishment, 1224 

undocking, 774 
Castle Island. See under South Boston (Mass.) 
Castle Island Terminal (aka Conley Container Terminal), 317, 

317nl45, 318, 347 
Caswell, William, 442 
Cavalier Coach, 353, 717 
Cavite (Philippines), 20 
Cavite Navy Yard, 12, 1215 
CBT. SeeChilds Bertman Tseckares 
Ceara(S1A). See Amberjack. USS (SS-522) 
Celebrate the Summer Solstice, 999 

Centennial Exposition See 1876 International Centennial Expo- 
sition, Philadelphia 
Central Artery (aka John F. Fitzgerald Expressway) 

laydown space during demolition. 1154 

Mystic River Bridge connection, 626, 676, 1124 

replacement, 222, 351, 608, 877 (see also Central Artery North 
Area Project; Central Artery/Tunnel (CA/T) project) 
Central Artery North Area Project (CANA) 

Constitution Rd realignment, 628. 676 

impact on bus service. 676 

mitigation measures, 222, 838 



Pages 1 -394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



\2b\ 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Central Artery North Area Project (CANA) — Continued 
parking lot restoration, 223 
purpose, 608 
staging area, 945 
YMCA demolition, 243, 608 
Central Artery/Tunnel (CA/T) project 

See also Ted Williams Tunnel (aka Third Harbor Tunnel) 

autoport closure, 717 

barge loading facility, 1149 

cofferdam, 351 

concrete plant, 698 

contractors, 355, 728 

displaced businesses, 891-892 

impact on Massport Marine Terminal, 728, 877 

Laboratory (see South Boston Annex - Facilities - Numbered 

Buildings & Structures - 88) 
Parcel M-1 delay and, 873 
route, 351 

severing of railroad tracks, 326, 344, 979 
staging area/laydown space, 347, 349. 351, 1154 
steel tube prefabrication, 351 
support buildings, 884 
Central Co-operative Bank, 593 
Central Parking Structure. See South Boston Annex - Facilities - 

Parcels - Y 
Central Wharf. See under Boston (Mass.) 
CG-70?(aka YP-5 (YP-5)), 913 
C H Wheeler (firm), 594 
Chadwick, Vincent, 502 
chain production, 105, 107 

See also die-lock chain 
Chandler. William E„ 63, 178, 1091 
Chaponis, Edward W., 833 
Chapter 91, Mass. General Laws 
licenses 

procedures, 346 

BMIP master plan, 345-346, 889, 1155 
Boston Design Center, 346 
Building 114, 258, 258n725, 588-589, 1156 
Building 197, 617 

Central Parking Structure, 892-893 
Constellation Wharf condominiums, 933 
HarborView project, 848, 856, 1155 
Massport Marine Terminal, 347, 873 
New Boston Seafood Distribution Center, 890 
Parcel 4A-1 (Navy Yard Rowhouses), 849 
Pier 1 Ferry Landing, 1157 
Pier 3 reconstruction, 914 
Pier 4 reconstruction, 926 
Pier 6 reconstruction, 926, 929 
Pier 10, South Boston Annex, 950 
Residences at Pier 5, 925 
Shipyard Quarters Marina, 839-840, 856, 1155 
waterfront development oversight, 248, 260 
Charles, Arsen, 225 

Charles F. Adams-c\ass guided missile destroyers, 1135 
Charles H Davis, USNS (AGOR-5) (aka Jul. HMNZS), 1197 
Charles P. Cecil. USS (DD-835), 305 
Charles R. Ware, USS (DE-547), 1115, 1160 
Charles T. Main Inc., 567, 629 
Charleston (S C.) 

Civil War, 50, 1087, 1161 
Fort Sumter, 1087 
submarine overhaul complex, 155 
Charleston Naval Shipyard (S.C.) (aka Charleston Navy Yard) 
authorization, 12. 12n11 
closure (disestablishment), 15, 1150 
as core facility, 13, 180 
establishment, 1096 
Facilities 

Building 4 (General Storehouse), 364 
Building 6 (Forge Shop), 70 
marine railway, 93, 830 
portal cranes, 952, 955 
fleet consolidation, 194 
on map of naval shipyards, 11, 14 
Navy file code, 1215 
redesignation, 1096 
World War II, 9. 370 
Charleston Navy Yard See Charleston Naval Shipyard 
Charlestown (Mass.) 

See also American Revolution - Bunker Hill, Battle of 

annexation by Boston (Mass.), ix, 1089 

archeological work. 15nn20-21 

archival materials, 1189-1190 

Binneys Wharf / White's Wharf / Oakman & Eldndge's Wharf. 

52, 896-898. 1088 
Breed's Hill, 15, 362, 446. 546. 1077 
Bunker Hill Monument 
construction, 23, 761 
on Navy Yard seal, xn 



Charlestown (Mass ) 

Bunker Hill Monument — Continued 
in photos 

19th century. 50, 55, 62, 1093 
20th century, 278, 431. 623 
21st century, 375, 1049 
relative height. 42. 510 
view of Navy Yard from. 37, 56, 995 
Chelsea St. (aka Salem Turnpike) (see also Chelsea-Water 
Streets Connector) 
BNHP boundaries, 383 
Bunker Hill Day Parade, 27 
bus service, 676, 739 
easements, 1146 
First Ave. connection. 222 
Little Mystic Channel bridge, 28, 589, 742. 747 
Mystic River Bridge, impact of, 167, 625-626, 743-744, 

748 
Navy-Salem Turnpike Co. land exchange. 1080 
Navy Yard access 
Building 1, 1091 
Building 21, 757 
Building 79, 533 

Building 204, 167, 625-626, 1124 
Building 266 

access to Quarters L-O, 816 
facing into Navy Yard, 45 
reorientation to front Salem Turnpike (Chelsea 
St.), 43, 435, 742, 747, 750, 1084 
Gate 4, 816-819 

location, 215, 1009 
opening of, 41, 471 
pedestrian-only entrance, 215 
proposal for new 5th St., 1032 
World War II enlargement, 29 
Gate 5, 821 

Gate 6, 221-222, 588, 751. 822, 1046 
Marine Barracks, 18-19, 429-430, 742, 816, 1056 
Quarters G 

closure (World War ll-era security measure), 27, 

44, 425 
Commandant's House Driveway, 816, 1050 
fencing, 27, 44, 422, 1107 
railroad tracks (proposed), 972, 975 
Ropewallk/lndustnal Relations Office, 47. 120. 471, 
520, 739 
Navy Yard Boundary Wall and 
Building 79 area, 742 
Commandant's House area, 425, 456 
commemorative marker, 745-746 
construction of Wall, 24, 741, 810, 1080-1081 
Lower Quarters Yard area, 751 
relocation, 220, 1145 

replacement with fence, 373, 435, 737-739, 743 
Ropewalk area, 743 
Navy Yard expansion (proposed), 24 
Navy Yard parking, 188 
sewer line, 63 
streetcar stop, 27, 520 
City Council. 1089 
City Hall, 897, 991 
City Sq 

Armed Services YMCA. 243, 608. 611 
Central Artery. 626 

Chelsea St. connection (see Chelsea-Water Streets Con- 
nector) 
City Hall, 991 

Navy Yard expansion (proposed), 24 
sidewalks, 218 
tunnel, 222, 608. 676 
Constitution Rd (see Water St.) 
Henley Place, 626-627 
Henley St. 

Boundary Wall and, 26, 743. 810, 813 
legal disputes, 1003, 1081, 1084-1085 
Navy Yard access 

Building 204, 167, 192, 625-627 
Gate 2, 215, 441. 743, 813-814. 1107 
main entrance (proposed), 810, 813 
history, 15 
Hoosac Pier. See also Hoosac Docks 

Pier 1 modernization project, 68, 70, 147. 898, 1095 
protection dolphins. 159, 183, 682, 1116 
reconstruction. 147. 580. 682, 824, 975 
redevelopment, 1116 
safety (exclusion) zone, 276, 683 
Hoosac Stores No. 1 & 2 
in BNHP proposal. 199 
boxcars, 227 
construction, 898 

fences and gates, 276, 823, 825, 1125 
as Friends of the Museum of Printing storage. 258 
landscaping, 1059 
location relative to Building 16, 1093 
location relative to Main Gate, 65 



Charlestown (Mass.) 

Hoosac Stores No 1 & 2 — Continued 
National Register listing, 360n7 
as Navy Yard boundary, 24n53, 158, 170, 199 
NPS ownership of, 24n53, 1145 
parking area, 223. 824, 1059, 1125 
view from roof, 221, 812. 1009 
YMCA reuse proposal, 244n629, 608 
Medford St., 975 
Moulton's Point, 15, 546. 1119 
Mystic Pier 347. 747. 945 
prison not, 1121 

Salem Turnpike (see Charlestown (Mass) - Chelsea St) 
St Frances De Sales Church, 623 

Water St. (aka Constitution Rd.) (see also Chelsea-Water 
Streets Connector) 
Boston & Marine Railroad properties. 24 
easements. 1144. 1146 
legal disputes. 442. 1081. 1084-1085 
line of Navy Yard job applicants. 825 
location, 1003 

Navy-Hull land transaction, 810 
Navy Yard access 
Building 4, 442-444 
Building 97, 76 
Gate 1, 215. 446. 810 
proposed closure. 810. 813 
USS Constitution Gate, 826 
Navy Yard Boundary Wall, 24, 810, 825, 897, 1085 
renamed Constitution Rd., 221 
sewer system. 63 
Charlestown Boatyard, 587 

Charlestown Navy Yard (aka Boston Naval Shipyard: Boston Navy 
Yard) 
Accounting Dept . 502 
Accounting Division, 499 
Accounting Officer, 497 
Acting Shipyard Commander, 1131 
Administrative Dept., 1176, 1179 
Administrative Officer. 577 
administrative organization (FY 1972). 1199 
administrative reorganization (1867), 1089 
Aide to the Commandant, 1 02 (see also Mahan, Alfred Thayer) 
Annual Report 
FY 1898, 971 
FY 1907,971-972 
"Apple Orchard" birthday party. 188. 437. 439. 1178 
appraisal, 1140-1143 
apprenticeship program, 1208 
archeological overview, need for, 2, 8, 361, 394 
archeological potential, ill. 3. 264. 360-361 
archival materials, 8, 155n329. 394, 1175-1192 
Army-Navy "E" (Efficiency) banner, 1109 
artifacts, 205-206, 1183-1184 
Assistant Captain of the Yard. 98 
baseball team, 1126 

beneficial suggestions program, 1117, 1124 
blood drives, 1112, 1117 
boatbuilders, 1208 
boatswain, 418 
boilermakers. 1208 
Boston Naval Shipyard News [see Boston Naval Shipyard 

News) 
boundaries, 24, 70. 201, 1080. 1104. 1116 
BRA master plan 

1975 master plan. 233-234 
1990 master plan 

Building 75, 234, 530. 862, 1148 
Building 108, 244, 572 
Gate 6, 234, 749. 822, 1046 
hotel and conference center, 234. 844 
New England Aquarium. 234, 259. 862 
Pier 5 housing, 922 
site plan. 235 

Yard's End. 221-222, 233, 237. 588. 862, 868. 1148 
recommendations for revisions (current), 5. 359. 383 
Building 195, 119 
bus service, 223, 303. 1150 
Buy Parcel (see New Development Area) 
Captain of the Yard ( see also Grady, RonanC . Haxtun. Milton; 
Luce, Stephen B ) 
abolishment of position. 439 
archival materials. 1187 
Offices. 447. 472, 475. 497. 499, 577 
quarters, 43, 102, 435, 438-439. 1099 
responsibilities, 1213-1214, 1226 
Carpenter 418 
caulkers. 1208 
Central Files. 497 

Chaplain, 96 (see also Fetch, Cheever) 
character-defining features 4-5, 369, 372-375 
Chief Engineer. 419. 1187 
Christmas parties. 1058. 1126, 1128 
City of Boston Reuse Plan, 1138 



Pages 1 -394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



- 1252 



Index 



Charlestown Navy Yard — Continued 

Civil Engineer (see also Billings, Joseph E.; Hastings, Charles; 
White, U.S.G.; Public Works Officer) 
Annual Reports 
FY 1856, 970 
FY 1857, 531 
FY 1863,970 
FY 1865, 994 
FY 1867, 557 
FY 1868, 851,994 
FY 1877, 1000 
FY 1890, 435 
FY 1901, 1004 
FY 1904, 74, 1097 
archival materials, 1187 
facilities plans and recommendations 
Building 1. 435 
Building 32, 474 
Building 124, 596 
Building 149, 602 
Building 266. 435 

drawings of Navy Yard buildings (1870s), 459 
Dry Dock 3, 93, 763. 920, 994. 1097 
Gate 1, 810-811 
railroad tracks, 970 
South Boston Annex Building 1, 692 
streets & roadways, 1004 
Timber Dock, 994 
water and gas main, 1004 
Wire Rope Mill, 525-526 
Offices, 60, 471-472, 559 
quarters. 419 
Civilian Cafeteria Board. 490. 1116 

civilian workforce (see Charlestown Navy Yard - employees) 
closure (disestablishment). 15, 178, 180, 182-194, 1137- 
1138. 1150 
archival materials, 1179 
ceremony, 194 
mock grave, 1178 
rationale. 180 
recommendations for, 1128 
Commandant (see also Andrews. Philip; Badger, Oscar C; 
Bambridge, William; Brown, Wilson, Jr.; Coffman, 
DeWitt; Crane, William M; de Steiguer, Louis; Downes, 
John; Elliott, Jesse D.; Fremont, John C; Fyffe, Joseph; 
Gherardi, Walter R.; Gleaves. Albert; Gregory, Francis 
H.; Gygax, Felix X.; Harris, John; Haxtun. Milton; Hough, 
Henry H.; Howison, Henry L; Hudson. William L; Hull, 
Isaac; Johnson. Mortimer L; Kimberly. Lewis A.; 
McCann, William P.; Miller, Joseph N.; Montgomery, 
John B.; Morris, Charles; Nichols, Edward T.; Nicholson, 
Samuel; Nicolson. John B.; Nulton, Louis M ; Parker, 
FoxhallA.; Parker, Foxhall A., Jr.; Parrott, Enoch G.; Pick- 
ing, Henry F.; Ransom, George M.; Robison, Samuel 
S.; Rodgers, John; Rush, William R ; Sampson, Will- 
iam T.; Selfridge, Thomas O ; Shubrick, William B 
Snow. Albert S.; Spicer. William F.; Steedman, Charles 
Stringham. Silas H.; Swift, William; Tarbell, Joseph 
Tarrant, William T; Tattnall, Joseph; Theobald, Robert 
A.; Wilde, George F.F.; Wiley, Henry A.; Shipyard Com- 
mander) 

1820s and 1830s. 1081 
1840s, 1085 
archival materials, 1187 
duties, 93, 425-426 
early 20th century, 1096 
late 19th century, 1090 
naval vessels named for, 4n10. 362 
separation of duties from First Naval District Comman- 
dant, 43, 426, 1112 
World War II, 1109 
Comptroller Dept , 1176, 1179 
consolidation plans, 158, 171-172, 172n354, 197 
Constitution. USS. and. 172-177 
Construction & Repair Dept 
Building 16 Foundry, 65 
Building 24 Carpenters Shop, storage, and offices, 75, 

463 
Building 38 Cooperage, 493 
Building 66 Iron Platers Shop, 547 
Building 104 Shipfitters Shop. 541, 548, 554 
Building 105 SmitheryS Power House. 74n194, 77, 541, 

546. 548, 554 
Building 106 Metalworkers Shop, 541, 548, 554 
Building 114 Woodworking Shop, 582 
Building 125 Paint Shop, 598 
functions. 555 

shipbuilding and repair complex (proposed). 538 
contractors, investigations of, 58 
contributing resources summary. 380 
coppersmiths, 1208 
as core facility (1960s), 13 
critical report of, 1131 
Cultural Landscape Report 
images from, ix 



Charlestown Navy Yard 

Cultural Landscape Report — Continued 
preparation of, 2 

recommendations for. 8, 381, 394 
recommendations from, 6, 230-231, 359, 391. 829 
use in development of groundplane guidelines, 6, 8, 392 
defined, 24 

Dental Dept.. 155, 592, 1124, 1176, 1179 
Design Division, Planning Dept. 
drafting rooms, 500 

drawings by, 811, 818, 825, 875, 1129-1130 
employees, 501-502 (see also Crite, Allan Rohan; 
Hamilton, Allen; Krim, Joanne; Krim, William; 
Rimkewich. Edward G.) 
Development Board, 522 
Director of Management Engineering, 305 (see also Calarese. 

John B.) 
Disbursing Officer, 102 (see also Pay Director; Pay Officer) 
disposition of excess property, 397 
disposition parcels, 204 
Diving School, 586 
Docking Officer, 806, 834 
driver (teamster), 1209 
Easter party, 1126 
electricians, 1209 
electronics technicians, 1209 
Employee Cooperative Association, 1116 
employees 

African Americans, 1108 (see also Crite, Allan Rohan) 

archival materials, 1179 

bus service for, 303 

community spirit, 1126-1127 

employment notice, 1119 

by era 

1816-1974, 53 

1860, 1087 

Civil War, 50, 1088, 1121 

1880s, 55, 178, 1091 

1890s, 63 

World War I, 82, 518, 1121 

1919, 1104 

1930s, 109 

World War II, 13, 120, 520, 1108, 1112-1113, 1126, 

1187 
after World War II, 146, 150, 1124 
Korean War, 1 50 
Cold War, 150 
1970s, 150 
ferry service for, 303, 1124 
uniforms, 1184 

white collar workers, 501-502 
women 

as white collar workers, 501-502 
World War I, 501-502, 516, 518 
World War II, 120, 120n258, 1108, 1112-1113, 1120. 
1126 
work hours, 1119 
Engineer Officer, 102 
Engineering Officer (see Bailey, W.S.) 
Equipment & Supplies Dept., 440 
Equipment Dept. 

Building 24 Rigging Loft, 463 
Building 33 Receiving Store, 478 
Building 40 offices and chain production, 506, 549 
Building 42 Chain Forge, 510, 538 
Building 42 chainmaking operations, 506 
Building 52 Boiler House, 1089 
Building 62 addition (proposed). 526 
manufacturing responsibilities, 538 
Equipment Officer, 435, 1093 (see also Luce, Stephen B.) 
establishment, 15, 15-16, 1077 
existing conditions, 380-381, 1239-1243 
expansion via eminent domain, 1112, 1115 
facilities overseen by, 1 46 
Fire Dept., 132, 486-487, 631, 1035, 1143 
first naval officers' school, 1120 
forgers, 1209 
foundrymen, 1209 
General Storekeeper, 497-498 
grid circulation pattern 

as character-defining feature, 4, 372-373, 382 
existing conditions, 376. 382 
recommendations, 6, 382, 391 
in redevelopment, 219 
significance of, 1000 
siting of buildings, 31, 33 

streets & roadways, 1000-1002 (seea/sospecific Streets 
St Roadways under Charlestown Navy Yard - Fa- 
cilities) 
Gunner 

quarters, 418 
HAER documentation, 7, 383-384, 391, 393 (see also under 
specific facilities under Charlestown Navy Yard - Fa- 
cilities) 



Charlestown Navy Yard — Continued 

Harbor Commissioners' line (aka pier and bulkhead line) 
Dry Dock 5 and, 1108 
exemptions. 589, 1155, 1157 
as Navy Yard boundary, 908 
Pier 1 and, 899 
Pier 2 and, 908 
Pier 3 and, 912, 914 
Pier 4 and, 122, 926-927, 1107 
Pier 5 (ex-Pier 4A) and. 926-927, 1107 
Pier 6 (ex-Pier 5) and, 122, 926-927, 1107 
Pier 7 (ex-Pier 6) and, 122, 926 
Pier 8 and. 122 
Pier 9 and, 122, 851-852 
revision (1918), 853, 920, 926, 930. 934 
revision (1948), 928, 939-940 
year established, 908 
hazardous material remediation (see Defense Environmen- 
tal Restoration Program-Formerly Used Defense Sites 
(DERP-FUDS)) 
Historic Monument Area (see also specific facilities under 
Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities) 
archival materials, 1190-1191 
BRA building demolition, 236, 240, 1144 
building preservation guidelines, 205, 21 3, 222. 248, 380. 

822. 1154 
existing conditions, 244, 268, 271, 376, 380 
groundplane guidelines 

Cultural Landscape Report and. 8, 394 
deviations and violations 

overhead steam line removal, 210, 552 
railroad track removal, 248, 381 , 976-977, 1 008, 

1020 
removal of building attachments, 210 
signage, 481 

streets and roadways, 1000 
utility line removal, 381 
recommendations, 5-6, 381, 383, 392, 519 
leases, 219n510, 236, 236n595, 237 (see also underBos- 

ton Redevelopment Authority) 
location, 205 

in NPS List of Classified Structures, 395 
oversight, 552 

Program of Preservation and Use, 222 
redevelopment, 240-242 
current status, 380 
developers, 238, 245, 481 
new construction, 241, 243, 271, 608, 1149 
overview, 236, 236n598 
residential development, 247 
retail operations, 244 
transfer to BRA, 205, 237. 248. 1144 
historic resource study 

Boston Naval Shipyard, definition of, 359-360 
character-defining features, 4-5, 369, 372-375 
contributing resources summary, 380 
documentation of the Navy Yard, 383-391 
existing conditions, 380-381 
historical contexts, 4, 362-363, 366 
historical themes, 3, 3, 362, 368-369, 379 
integrity of Navy Yard, 376, 378-379, 380 
management summary, 1-8 
National Historic Landmark criteria, 361-362 
National Register criteria, 360-361 
National Register status, 3-4 
period of significance, 3, 366-368 
property types, 372, 376-379 
purpose of, 1 
recommendations 

BRA NPS coordination, 7-8, 383 
for further studies, 7-8, 393-394 
for physical treatment, 5-7, 391-393 
rehabilitation and interpretation as recommended 
approach, 5, 381-383 
Scope of Work, 1-2 
statement of significance, in, 2-3. 360 
historic significance, 215 
Historic Structure Report (HSR), 8, 394 
Historical Base Map (1978), 2, 19 
history, 9-278 

1812-1827. 29-31, 104 
War of 1812. 11, 16, 19, 22, 896 
1828 master plan, 31-33 
pre-Civil War era, 39, 41, 48-49 
Civil War era, 50-52 

employment, 50. 1088, 1121 
improvements. 37-38, 40-41 
shipbuilding, 11-12, 49-50, 52, 1087, 1121 
post-Civil War (1865-1890). 12. 52-57, 59-62 
resurrection (1890-1912). 63, 65-67, 70-80 
World War I era. 82-83, 85, 87-91, 1121 
employment of women. 518 
expansion, 512 
shipbuilding, 1103 
1920s 93-105, 1053 



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Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



1253- 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Charlestown Navy Yard 
history — Continued 

1930s, 107-110, 112-118, 120 

World War II, 120-128, 130-145 
aerial photographs, ixnl. 123, 278 
employment, 13, 120. 520, 1108. 1112-1113, 1126, 

1187 
on map of Navy facilities. 14 
security improvements. 27-28, 250, 253, 741, 743, 

748-749, 1107 
ship construction, conversion, and repair, 123-124, 

134-145, 1117 
yard improvements, 24 
post-World War II, 146-172 
Sesquicentennial, 147-149 
1970s, 179 

contemporary photos, 265-275, 277, 1241 
as home to other government agencies, 16, 18 
Hull & Machinery Division, 483 
Hull Division, 459, 498 
industrial character 

elimination during redevelopment, 380 
historic resource study contexts, 363 
preservation guidelines, 382 
Industrial Dept.. 109, 1107, 1213 
industrial hygiene, 513, 551 

Industrial Relations Dept., 502, 520, 739, 1176, 1187 
Inspection Officer. 497 
integrity, 376, 378-379 
interim park plan, 199, 202-203 
interpretive waysides, 5, 7, 382-383, 393 
Junior Aide to the Commandant. 102 
"Keep Your Shipyard Clean" campaign, 1130 
Labor Board, 27, 47, 65, 443 (see also Charlestown Navy 
Yard - Numbered Buildings & Structures - 58; 
Charlestown Navy Yard - Other Structures & Facilities 
- Industrial Relations Office) 
labor history studies, 8, 394 
land acquisition, 16, 24, 1077-1078 
legislative boundary map, 195 
legislative jurisdiction, 1139 
List of Classified Structures, 2, 393-394 
location relative to South Boston Annex, 279 
machinists, 1210 

Management Engineering Division, 305. 503 
Manager (see also Brand, Charles L.; Enright, Earl F ; Marron, 
Adrian R ; Norton, Edmund R.; Schlabach, Ross P.; Sim- 
mers. C M ; Woodruff. John W.) 
change of command. 1104-1107, 1109, 1112 
previous assignments. 288n28 
Ropewalk inspection, 1112 
on South Boston Annex development board, 283 
manufacturing activities 
Chain Forge, 105, 107 
industrial specialization, 11, 63 
phasing out of, 153 
post-closure, 261-262 

redesignation as manufacturing yard (1886), 63, 1091 
Ropewalk, 43, 45, 48 
wire rope manufacture, end of, 1102 
on map of naval shipyards, 11,14 
Marine Corps and, 18-21 

Marine Corps Officer of the Day Office, 18 (see also 
Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - Numbered Build- 
ings & Structures - 30) 
Master Mechanic of the Forge Shop, 550 (see also Leahy, 

Albert M.) 
master plan (see also Charlestown Navy Yard - BRA master 
plan; Charlestown Navy Yard - Shore Station Develop- 
ment Plan) 
master plan (1828), 31-33 

current status of site, 376, 391 
facilities 

canals, 33, 1016, 1040 
dry docks, 33, 761 
existing structures, 30, 33, 508n1 
gates, 33, 810, 813, 1012 
piers and wharves, 33. 851, 908-909 
quarters, 33. 418 
shipbuilding ways. 33 

streets & roadways, 33, 1000, 1003-1004, 1010- 
1011. 1036 (see also Charlestown Navy Yard - 
Facilities - Streets & Roadways - Second Ave ) 
Timber Dock. 33, 994 
grid pattern 

building placement. 31, 33, 1034 
recommendations (from HRS), 6, 391 
streets & roadways, 31, 1000, 1003-1004, 1052 
historic significance. 361. 363 
mandate for. 11, 31, 1081 
numbering system. 32-33. 39, 395, 851 
preparation, transmittal, and approval, 31. 761, 1081 
site plan, 32 
master plan (1869), 52-53, 518 
in. i ,li , plan ll'lhil ,) IS/ I HO 



Charlestown Navy Yard — Continued 
Mechanical Engineer, 501 
Medical Officer, 102, 437, 513 
Military Dept., 1198. 1213 
mission, 146, 1105 
modernization efforts 

1890-1912, 22. 63, 65-67, 70-80 

1960s, 158. 171 

1972. 1134 

Modernization Study (1967). 1134 
muster bell, 462-463 
National Landmark documentation, 1 
National Register status 

current status, 3-4, 196-197, 363, 395 

nomination photographs, 385-390 

recommendations, 1-4, 7, 393 
Naval Constructor. 462, 598, 1047 (see also Baxter, William 

J ; Pook, Samuel M.) 
Navy file code, 1215 
Navy Yard Employees Band, 480, 1108 
Navy Yard Workers Reunion, 1151 

New Development Area (aka Buy Parcel) (see also specific 
facilities under Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities) 

archeological overview, 2, 361 

Boston HarborWalk, 6, 260, 391 

BRA-lmmobiliare New England agreement, 237, 1144, 
1148 

design guidelines amendments, 1148 

development difficulties, 231, 247 

development proposals, 233, 236-238, 247. 380, 617, 
847 

development rights, 237, 247, 1139 

existing conditions, 237, 380 

funding, 1144 

land disposition, 237, 1144 

marina development, 238. 839-840 

mitigation efforts, 213 

original goals, 233, 236 

oversight, 248 

preservation guidelines, 205, 380 

sale to BRA, 205, 237, 1144 

site plan showing parcel subdivision, 204 

size, 205 

Yard's End 

in BRA master plan, 233, 235, 868, 1148 

building demolition, 249, 380 

development delays, 231, 274 

development proposals, 237, 380, 588, 862, 1149. 

1155 
hotel (proposed), 237, 247, 847 
research center (proposed), 237, 862, 868 
nomenclature, ix-x 

Office for Submarine Construction, 133 
Officer-of-the-Day. 97 
open houses, 1132-1133 
Ordnance Dept.. 61. 442, 483, 496, 1003 
Ordnance Officer, 435, 1187 
Ordnance Storage, 1106 
painters, 1210 
Painters Dept., 1188 
parking (post-closure), 223-224 
patternmakers, 1210 
Pay & Dispersing Office, 87 

Pay Director, 991 (see also Disbursing Officer; Pay Officer) 
Pay Inspector (see Washington, Richard; Disbursing Officer; 

Pay Director; Pay Officer) 
Pay Office, 65, 96 
Pay Officer (see also Disbursing Officer; Pay Director) 

quarters, 418 
Paymaster (see Swan, Francis H.; Disbursing Officer; Pay 

Director; Pay Officer) 
period of significance, 366-368, 379-380 
personnel, 1126-1127, 1225 
Personnel Dept.. 1112 

Compensation section, 476 
pier and bulkhead line (see Harbor Commissioners' line) 
pipefitters, 1210 

Planning & Estimating Division, 498, 1176 
Planning Dept., 1130, 1176 
Planning Division, 324, 514 
Planning Officer, 283, 501 
porter, 418 

Printing Office, 96, 560 

Production Dept., 724, 727, 941-942, 1130, 1176. 1179 
Production Division. 499. 514 
Production Division Storage, 1106 
Production Officer, 437. 806, 809. 1112. 1131. 1212 (see also 

Enright, Earl F , Flynn, Joseph E.; McGillicuddy, T.T.) 
property rights to, 205, 205n453 
property types. 372, 376-379 
proposed site. 16 
Provisions & Clothing Dept.. 493 
public use. 253-255 
Public Works Dept (formerly Yards & Docks Dept ) 

archival materials, 1176, 1179, 1187 



Charlestown Navy Yard 

Public Works Dept. — Continued 
drafting office, 541 

drawing index card file, 93n225. 303n77 
facilities repairs and site selection, 444, 468. 562 
offices. 94, 514, 559 

Topographic and Sub-Surface Maps. 1180 
workshops, 443, 514, 557 
Public Works Officer (see also Bentley, James A.: Curtis. Ira 
N., Kaloupek, William E.; Liberty. Harold F ; Rowe. Harry 
C; Searles, Paul J.; Charlestown Navy Yard - Civil En- 
gineer) 
facilities reguests and assessments. 217, 577, 605, 806. 

811-812 
offices, 497 
guarters. 102, 437 
Quality & Reliance Assurance Dept (see Quality Assurance 

Office) 
Quality Assurance Office (aka Quality & Reliability Assurance 

Dept), 468, 484. 514 
Quality Control & Assurance Dept . 186 
radio communications, 452 
Recreation Association, 1127 
Recreation Fund. 641 
Red Feather Campaign. 1126 

redevelopment, 240-242 (see also Boston National Histori- 
cal Park; Boston Redevelopment Authority; Charlestown 
Navy Yard - BRA master plan) 
NPS master plan (1973), 200 
NPS rehabilitation projects. 226-231 
preservation and development guidelines. 213, 381 
reorganization (1945), 1115 
Repair Superintendent, 834 
Rescue Boat, 585. 638 
restaurant, 466-467 
riggers, 1211 
Safety Engineer, 476 
Safety Officer, 655 

Sailing Master, 1191 (see also Waldo, Charles W) 
Sailmaker. 418 

salt water circulation loop. 1105 
seal, xii 
security 

barricades, 264, 266. 678, 681. 1009 1154-1155 
Constitution. USS (see Constitution. USS - security) 
gate access, 169. 811-812, 1014 
lighting improvements, 231, 276 
for Navy personnel, 276, 378-379. 685 
terrorism, response to, 231. 262, 264, 276, 814, 1154 
vehicle access, 262. 264. 276. 681, 814, 1030 
visiting dignitaries, 262, 264 
visiting ships, 262. 276. 1150 
visitor screening, 264, 276. 685 

World War II, 27-28. 250. 253, 741. 743, 748-749, 1107 
Senior Aid, 419 

Senior Assistant, Hull Division, 102 
Sesquicentennial celebrations, 169, 667, 1116-1123 
sheetmetal workers. 1211 
ship transfer ceremonies, 776, 903. 1135-1136 
shipbuilding, repair, and conversions 

list of ships built by Navy Yard, 1159-1174 
by era 

first ships built by Navy Yard, 16. 22-23, 22n45 
19th century, 1161 
pre-Civil War, 48-49 
Civil War, 11-12, 49-50, 52, 1087, 1121 
1880s- 1900, 12 
20th century, 1165-1167 
1920s, 93-94 
1930s, 107-109 

World War II, 123-124, 134-145, 1103, 1117 
closure as a shipyard, 153, 1091 
guided missile conversions. 150-152 
repair work, 22, 263 
transferred vessels 1174 
by type 

half-hull models, 49 
service craft 1172-1173 
small boats 586 
steel ships, 12 80 

warships and auxiliaries. 81-82, 1159-1160, 1163- 
1164, 1168-1171 
Shipyard Commander (see also Arthur, Russel L; Brockett, 
William A , Burk, Raymond W.; Gold. Pleasant D , Jr . 
Gooding, Robert C , Hague, Wesley McL.; Howard, 
William E.. Jr ; Jones, Frank C. Jones. Stuart C . 
Marron, Adrian R.; McGillicuddy. TT, Ruhlman. Fred 
L ; Snyder, Philip W; Watt, R Morgan, Jr ) 
archival materials. 1176 

Change of Command ceremony, 656-657, 993 1199 
final 20 years, 1125 
office, 503 

Pier 11 Marginal Wharf proposal. 940 
quarters. 426, 435 (see also Charlestown Navy Yard - 
Facilities - Numbered Buildings & Structures - 266) 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



1254 



Index 



Charlestown Navy Yard 

Shipyard Commander — Continued 

separation from First Naval District Commandant duties, 
1082 
Shore Station Development Board. 931 
Shore Station Development Plan, 155, 303, 913, 937, 939, 

1115 
signage, 600 

as character-defining feature, 4, 372, 375, 382 

motivational, 654 

Officers Quarters, 437 

recommendations, 6-7, 392 

Safety Shoe sign, 7, 272, 382, 654, 655, 677 

safety signs, 561, 817, 923, 933 

stop sign, 627 

types of signs, 1184 

worker efficiency signs, 992 

"Yard Scales" sign, 454 
site plan 

1801, 17 

1802, 17 
1812, 19 
1823, 30 
1848, 39 
1867, 51 
1874, 54 

1876, 474 

1877, 1001, 1029, 1034, 1036, 1038 
1882, 64 

1897, 63 

1901, 72 

1902, 1004 

1903, 1018 

1904, 994, 1018 

1905, 1018 

1906, 1018 

1907, 1018 

1908, 1018 

1909, 820, 1018 

1911, 73 

1912, 618 

1913, 1043 

1914, 1043 
1919, 84 

1921, 95 

1922, 756-757 
1928, 1002 
1934, 110 
1940, 111 

1942, 476 

1943, 476 

1944, 507, 815n1 
1946, 129 
1951, 814, 815n1 
1954, 1002 
1963, 156 

real estate summary map (1969), 25 

1973, 181 

existing conditions (2006), 1242 
size, 24 

sonar development, 150-151, 451, 453 
South Boston, proposed move to, 158, 171-172 
special events, 253 
Steam Engineering Dept., 510, 1187 
steam heating, introduction of. 1089 
Superintendents, 1078 (see also Nicholson, Samuel) 
Supply Dept. 

archival materials, 1176, 1179 

Christmas party. 1126 

functions. 1130 

offices. 605 

recruitment parade, 603 

signage, 719 

storage, 94, 223, 602-607, 618-624 

use of Commonwealth Pier, 123, 1107 
Supply Officer, 102. 283, 305-306, 605, 991 
Surgeon, 435 

telephones, introduction of, 1092 
terrorism, response to, 262, 264, 276 
trades, 1208-1211 
Transportation Officer, 97 
tugboats, 578 

United Fund campaign, 1127 
in US naval shipyard history, 9-15 
visiting ships, plaques from. 1184 
water transportation (see water shuttles and ferry service) 
waterfront, as character-defining feature, 375 
welders, 1211 
Welfare Fund, 451 
in winter, 1093-1094 

blizzards, 1006, 1008 

buildings & structures, 630, 636, 642, 650. 827 

ferry passenger shelters. 838 

piers & wharves, 141, 832, 947 

roof collapse, 470. 1092 



Charlestown Navy Yard 
in winter — Continued 
Shipyard Mall. 992 

snow removal equipment. 712, 1006, 1047 
snowguards, 228 
snowman, 829 
Yard Clerk (see Waldo. Charles W.) 

Yards & Docks Dept. (see Public Works Dept, (formerly Yards 
& Docks Dept,)) 
Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

1962/63 Property Record Cards, 397 
condominium master deeds, 247 
contemporary photos, 265-275 
excess property list, 396 
HAER documentation, 383-384 
Master List of Structures, 398-409 

arrangement of, 395-396 
new facilities (1914-1919), 87-91 
new facilities (1940-1945), 121, 130-133 
NPS rehabilitation projects, 226-331 
Crane Rails W, X, Y, Z. See under Charlestown Navy Yard - 
Facilities - Numbered Buildings & Structures - 262 
(Bridge Crane Structure, Plate Yard) 
Dry Docks 

as character-defining feature, 4, 372-373, 375 

Discharge Culvert, 1180 

in Navy Yard plan (1801), 17 

in Navy Yard plan (1802), 17 

in Navy Yard statement of significance, in, 2-3, 360 

NPS rehabilitation projects, 227, 230 

1 [54), 760-771 

in 1968 consolidation plan, 171-172, 769 
ancillary structures, 155, 466 
archival materials, 1187, 1189-1190, 1192 
Building M-37 (Portable Shed) in, 687-688, 1155 
Caisson, 772-775 

aerial photo (1921), 1053 
culverts, 1095 
current status, 80, 1173 
deck replacement, 230, 1146 
launch, 80, 82, 1096, 1173 
Navy Yard closure, 186 
Navy Yard open house, 1133 
original wooden caisson, 59 
overhaul, 770, 778, 1149 
post-World War II, 159 
recommendations. 6 
replacement, 1096 
steel caisson construction, 764 
World War I, 83 
Capstans, 184, 764, 1097 

Capstan 1, 776-777, 778, 796 
Capstan 2, 266, 776, 778, 779 
Capstan 3, 776-779, 779, 796 
as character-defining feature, 373, 375 
Congressional study (1826-1827), 34, 1080-1081 
construction, repair, and improvements, 33-37 
plans, 35, 761 
original construction (1820s-1830s), 11, 35, 761, 

897, 1081, 1121-1122 
extension (1850s), 763, 766, 1087, 1121 
repairs (1874), 59 
floating gate repairs (1888), 1091 
resetting end of (1890s), 1092 
enlargement (1940s), 155, 159, 767, 779, 1116, 

1121 
repairs (1940s), 766 
utilities updating (1990s), 230 
current status. 261-263. 274 
dewatermg system, 765 

culvert to Building 1 23 (Pump House), 598, 764- 

765, 769, 782, 1096-1097, 1180 
engine and pumps for, 79, 458, 595, 1092 
improvements, 166, 594, 767, 769, 1128 
historic significance, 197 
inauguration, 34, 762, 1081, 1119, 1122 
location within Navy Yard, 37-38, 52, 56, 1062, 1093 
locomotive crane, 124 
on master plan (1828), 33. 761 
National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark desig- 
nation. 34. 760. 1139. 1144 
National Register nomination, 7. 197, 361, 385-386. 

393 
Navy possession of (1833), 1084 
NPS management. 769-770 
portal crane tracks. 968 

building removal for, 80, 1098 
connection to Dry Dock 2, 467, 764. 960, 1055 
construction contract, 1098 
extent of, 952, 968 
gauge, 968 
portal cranes, 953-954, 958, 960-961 
in Preble History Gallery, 59 
railroad tracks. 970. 973. 977 
recommendations for. 6. 382, 391 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Dry Docks 

1 [54] — Continued 

safety measures, 762, 1086 
sandblasting operations. 170, 193 
shears, 1220 
ships in 

docking log (1928-1929), 94 
frigate, 38 

number of dockings by year, 763 
ship conversions, 1086, 1160n6, 1163nl0 
ship repair, 263, 766 

shipbuilding, 107, 107n244, 108, 765, 1166 
Buck, USS (DD-420), 766 
Cassin Young, USS (DD-793). 250, 252. 258. 
261-263, 770. 774, 777, 960, 1144, 1157 
Constellation, USS (IX-20). 175, 763 
Constitution, USS (IX-21) (aka Old Constitution, 
"Old Ironsides") 

NPS-Navy agreement to make dock avail- 
able to, 250, 262. 770 
1830s, 34, 762, 1081, 1119, 1122 
1927-1930, 94, 172. 174. 765, 776, 973. 

1105 
1936, 1106 
1945, 1115 
1957, 1125 
1963-1964, 176, 1128 
1973-1976, 158, 176-177, 183. 453, 773, 

903-904, 910, 1137 
1990s, 176, 230, 261, 263, 690, 775, 779, 
911, 1149 
Cumberland, USS (frigate), 762, 1087 
Decatur, USS (sloop-of-war), 36 
Dry Dock 2 Caisson, 777 
Fred T Berry. USS (DDE-858), 767 
Geran/mo(YT-119/YTM-119), 107n244, 108, 766 
Hambleton, USS (DD-455), 134 
Hartford, USS (IX-13), 763 
Independence, USS (ship-of-the-line). 762, 1084, 

1163n10 
John Prescolt (schooner), 764 
Jonas Ingram, USS (DD-938), 578 
Katahdin, USS (armored ram), 1092, 1187 
Kearny. USS (DD-432), 135-136 
L-4. USS (SS-43), 765 
Landing Barge, 905, 1144 
Monaghan, USS (DD-354), 1166 
Narragansett, USS (steam sloop), 763 
Nobska, SS, 6, 262, 262n761, 263, 382, 391, 

770-771, 1150, 1155 
Olympia, USS (C-6 / IX-40), 764 
RB 1 (barge), 905 
Scorpion, USS (PY-3), 67 
Shawmut. SS (aka Enchantress). 463 
Vandalia, USS (steam sloop), 58 
Vermont. USS (ship-of-the-line) (aka Virginia, 

USS) (keel laid 1818), 1085 
William R Rush. USS (DD-714), 768 
YF-298 (covered lighter), 1 48 
streets & roadways, 1006 
swinging gates, 764, 1095 
turning gates, 762, 764 
visitor services 

guided tours, 258 
interpretive wayside, 393 
open houses, 1133 
scuba diving demonstration, 1133 
in winter, 1093 
2, 780-786 

approach piers, 1097 
archival materials, 1187-1190 
Caissons. 160. 777. 785, 913, 1128, 1139 
cannon bollards, 206 
capacity limits, 788 
Capstans, 1198 
Capstan 4, 787 
Capstan 5, 787 
Capstan 6, 645, 782, 787 
Capstan 7, 787 
Capstan 8, 787 
Capstan 9, 787 
Capstan 10, 787 
Capstan 11, 787 
cover, 61 3 
cofferdam. 72. 780 
construction, repair, and improvements, 69 

original construction (1899-1905), 72, 595. 780. 
912. 915, 1119, 1177 
authorization for, 994, 1095 
impact on Dry Dock 1, 764 
office for construction inspectors, 1095 
as Timber Dock replacement, 24, 70, 996 
enlargement (1912), 1098 
reconstruction (1940s), 155, 160, 912-913, 1116 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1 077-1 244 = Volume 3 



- 1255 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Dry Docks 
2 

construction, repair, and improvements — Continued 
upgrades (1961). 158, 644, 786 

current status. 274 

dewatering system. 782 

culvert, 764-765, 769, 1096, 1180 
improvements. 166, 594, 767, 769, 784, 1128 
Pump House, 79, 210, 595, 765 

fill failure. 914 

HAER documentation, 210 

inauguration, 70, 773, 1098, 1119 

lighting, 186, 644-647, 1124 

location, 104, 994-995, 1053 

locomotive cranes, 975 

National Register nomination photos, 386 

at Navy Yard closure, 183 

on Navy Yard site plan (FY 1904), 994 

oxygen distribution system, 867 

portal crane tracks, 968 

connection to Dry Dock 1, 467, 764, 960, 1055 

connection to piers, 929, 959, 1125 

construction, 467, 780, 1097-1098 

extent of, 952, 968, 1025 

rail shared with railroad tracks, 973 

redevelopment, 968 

replacement, 581 

portal cranes, 953-954, 961-962 

railroad tracks, 973 

recommendations for, 6, 382, 391 

redevelopment (in Shipyard Park) 
boardwalk, 238-239, 786, 1048 
Boston HarborWalk. 1052, 1054 
BRA, remaining work to be done by, 786 
BRA historic park proposal, 197-198 
BRA reuse study. 231-232 
flooding of. 238, 769, 786, 1139 
landscaping, 239 

National Park Service, transfer to, 205 
Navy, U.S., national park proposal, 199 
New England Aquarium (proposed), 221, 259. 

786, 1148 
as parking facility (proposed), 197-198 
portal crane tracks, 998 
recreational use, 785 
shipbuilding (proposed), 997 
in Shipyard Park, 239, 786, 994n1 

ships in 

battleships, 91 

number of dockings by year, 781 

ship conversions, 152, 996 

ship launching, 765, 987 

shipbuilding, 81, 107-109, 986, 1166 

sonar installation, 151 

Albany, USS (CA-123 / CG-10), 152, 786 

Amerika, USS (Id. No. 3008), 788 

Aroostook. USS (CM-3), 83 

Brazos. USS (AO-4), 81 

Bronson, USS (DD-868), 953 

Case. USS (DD-370), 108, 782 

Constitution, USS (IX-21) (aka Old Constitution: 

"Old Ironsides"). 173 
Conyngham, USS (DD-371), 782 
Covington, USS (Id. No. 1409) (aka Cincinnati. 

SSI 83, 996 
Cretic. SS, 782, 973 
Dry Dock 1 Caisson, 773, 1053 
Dry Dock 3 Caisson, 775, 1053 
Edisto, USS (AGB-2), 954 
Fitch, USS (DD-462 / DMS-25), 987 
Florida, USS (BB-30), 104 
Forrest, USS (DD-461 / DMS-24), 987 
Illinois. USS (BB-7). 973 
Lansdale. USS (DD-426), 108 
LST-1154, USS (LST-1154 / AVB-2) (aka 

Tallahatchie County. USS), 148 
Madison, USS (DD-425), 108 
Maryland. USS (CA-8) (aka Frederick, USS/ 69- 

70, 780-781. 1098, 1119, 1188-1189 
Monaghan. USS (DD-354). 1166 
Muglord. USS (DD-389), 108 
AM. USS (SS-53). 782 
N-2, USS (SS-54), 782 

Nantucket II, USCG (WLV-613), 260-261, 786 
OBnen, USS (DD-415), 108, 782 
Providence. USS (CL-82 / CLG-6), 152 
Ralph Talbot. USS (DD-390). 108 
Rommel. FGNS (D-187) (aka DDG-30). 1136 
S-4. USS (SS-109), 763-764, 1216 
Shawmut. USS (CM-4) (aka Massachusetts. SS 

/ Oglala. USS), 782 
Spirit of Massachusetts. 1146 
Suffolk County. USS (LST-1173), 154 
Walke, USS (DD-416), 108, 782 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Dry Docks 
2 

ships in — Continued 

Willis A. Lee. USS (DL-4). 151, 160 
steam tunnel. 460 

streets & roadways, 1034, 1045, 1047 
truck accident, 1178 
visitor services 

educational programs, 261 
festivals and events, 253 
interpretive waysides, 5. 382-383 
visitor attraction plans, 259 
World War I, 83 
3 (proposed), 93, 763, 920, 994, 1097 

5 (ex-Shipways 3), 804-809 

caisson rehabilitation, 1134 

construction, repair, and improvements, 138 

original construction (1940s). 24, 112, 123. 1109 
building demolition for, 716, 861, 1108-1109 
impact on streets & roadways, 1046 
pier modifications for, 853 
plan, 804, 938, 986 
modernization (proposed, 1960s), 171, 807, 809 

current status, 274 

dewatering system, 1124 

HAER documentation, 210, 212, 809 

inactivation, 809, 1137 

location, 123, 853-854 

locomotive cranes, 212, 976 

model of, 809 

at Navy Yard closure, 183 

oxygen distribution system. 867 

pontoon closure, 805-806 

portal crane tracks, 162, 940, 952, 968 

portal cranes, 953-954, 961, 1108, 1134 

railroad tracks, 975 

redevelopment (in New Development Area) 
Boston HarborWalk, 1052, 1054 
BRA and, 232-233, 809, 1148 
BRA reuse study, 232-233 
floating hotel ship (proposed), 945 
New England Aquarium (proposed), 221, 234- 
235, 259, 259n740, 260, 588, 786, 809, 
862, 945, 1148-1149 
parcel division, 274, 809, 856n1. 857, 863 
Whydah Pirate Ship Museum (proposed), 259- 
260, 809, 945 

ships in 

FRAM II overhaul, 150 
number of dockings by year, 807 
shipbuilding, 1109 
/ltfD-76(ARD-16), 162,806 
Bayntun. HMS (BDE 1 / DE-1), 138, 806, 1109 
Bazely HMS (BDE 2 / DE-2), 138, 806. 1109 
Decatur. USS (DD-936 / DDG-31), 808, 945 
Gyatt. USS (DD-712 / DDG-712 / DDG-1), 806 
Hammerberg, USS (DE-1 01 5), 809 
Hissem. USS (DE-400 / DER-400). 806 
Hugh Purvis. USS (DD-709), 150, 807 
Vandivier. USS (DE-540 / DER-540), 146 
Wagner. USS (DE-539 / DER-539), 146 

stair/elevator tower, 1143 

visitor services, 259-260 

World War II, 131, 134, 146 

6 (proposed), 172. 769 
(12] (proposed), 33 
[13] (proposed), 33 
[14] (proposed), 33 

Gates, 26-29 (see also Building 97) 

as character-defining feature, 4, 372-373 
BRA and, 215, 218-219, 222n518, 821-822 

1, 810-812 

in Boston Naval Shipyard News. 1115 
bus drop-off site, 217 
fence and gateway, 1089 
First Ave. connection, 1000 
Gate House (see Building 267) 
historic plaques, 197 
location, 215 
Marine guard, 20-21, 26 
National Register nomination photos, 385 
at Navy Yard closure, 215 
as one-way exit. 814, 1116 
reconstruction, 1006-1007 
security, 262, 276, 1006 
in site plans. 417. 815n1 
tour bus parking. 224 
traffic congestion. 811. 1027 
Underground Pipe Conduit. 669. 671 
vehicular access, elimination of, 218, 221. 455, 819 
visitors, 1132, 1153 
1st St, 1059 

2, 813-814 

Boundary Wall and, 26, 742-743 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Gates 

2 — Continued 

as character-defining feature, 373 

construction, repair, and improvements, 26, 441, 

1012-1013 
location, 224, 627, 1015 
on master plan (1828), 1012 
National Register nomination photos, 385 
at Navy Yard closure, 215 
as one-way entry, 1116 
opening of, 1107 
security, 662, 1014 
in site plans, 815n1 
traffic congestion, 811 

3, 743, 815, 815n1 

4, 816-819 

5th Street road project 

BRA commitments, 245, 1139 

building demolition for, 219, 819, 1008 

construction, 819 

easements, 219, 1144 

impact on Navy Yard facilities. 214. 628, 1008, 
1044 

Memorandum of Agreement, 1139 

purpose, 812 

Section 106 agreement (1979), 245 
access changes after Navy Yard closure, 215, 219, 

221, 1032 
BNHP boundaries, 199 
Boundary Wall and, 221. 742-743 
construction, repair, and improvements 

conversion into vehicular gate, 217 818 

enlargement. 520 

location, 520 

reconstruction, 27, 737-738 

reconstruction of pedestrian ramp, 1128 

sidewalks. 218 

widening, 739 
National Register nomination photos. 385 
opening of, 41, 471. 1086, 1145 
security, 818, 1032 
signage, 600 
in site plans, 815n1 
vehicular access shift from Gate 1, 218, 455 

5, 820-821 

after Navy Yard closure, 215, 818, 822, 1043-1044, 
1046 

Boundary Wall and. 28, 742, 748-750 

construction, repair, and improvements 
original construction (1890s), 820 
reconstruction (proposed, 1913), 1042 
enlargement (1930s), 28, 109. 1023, 1043 
improvements (World War II), 533, 751 
rebuilding (proposed, 1957), 522 

Little Mystic River fence, 749 

location, 1043 

National Register nomination photos, 389-390 

in redevelopment plans, 232 

relocation (proposed). 1043 

road linkages. 1024 

in site plans, 815nl, 820 

WPA projects. 109. 820. 822. 1023. 1043 

6, 822 

Boundary Wall removal for, 748-749, 751 

BRA proposal for, 221-222, 588 

construction. 1046, 1149 

design guideline amendments, 1154 

plans, 234 

road linkages. 1024 
Railroad Gate. 823-824, 1059 

USS Constitution Gate (aka Curtain Gate), 197, 203, 259, 
825-826, 1059, 1125 
Laboratories. 484 

Chemical Laboratory, 97. 187. 472. 483-485 
Industrial Hygiene Laboratory, 460, 468 
Materials Laboratory, 483-485 
Metallurgical Laboratory, 187, 483 
Photographic Laboratory, ix, 187, 483. 501. 1177-1178 
Physical Testing Laboratory. 484 
Reference Standards Laboratory. 186, 468 
Test Laboratory. 525 
Vibration and Sound Laboratory, 514 
X-Ray Laboratory, 513 
Marine Railway 11 86, 93, 830-835 
archival materials, 1189 
as character-defining feature, 4, 372, 375 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1918), 86, 581, 909, 915. 1102 

reconstruction (1942). 1108 

replacement plans (1960s) 767. 769, 913 
current status, 274 

demolition, 172, 230, 249. 913, 1147. 1149 
designation, 831 
engineer, 93n223 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



1256 



Index 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Marine Railway 11 — Continued 

HAER documentation, 834-835, 1189 

hazardous condition of, 249n688 

inactivation, 1137 

inauguration, 1104 

location, 93n222, 104, 580, 843n1, 916 

locomotive crane, 910, 974 

locomotive crane tracks, 909 

at Navy Yard closure, 183-184 

NPS recordation project, 384 

recommendations for, 6, 391 

ships in 

number of dockings by year, 833 

Acushnet, USCG, 831 

Delphy. USS (DD-261), 831 

Grebe. USS (AM-43) 

Ossipee. USCG, 86, 93, 831 

Paulding. USCG (CG-17), 784 

Torsk, USS (SS-423), 832 

YOS- 15 (YOS-1 5), 834 
terminology for, 93n223 
Numbered Buildings & Structures [1828 master plan desig- 
nation in brackets] 
ice removal from buildings. 1036 
numbering system, 395, 429-430, 1089, 1096, 1154 

1 |C] (Garages / Timber Shed / Tank Shed / Gate House 

/ Masons Storage), 440-441 

construction, repair, and improvements, 113, 440, 
1049, 1081, 1106-1107 

current status, 265 

demolition, 1091, 1107 

Driveway, 1049 

Tire, 1154 

as garage space, 662 

location. 991 

on master plan (1828), 33, 440 

Navy Yard entrance, 1091 

redevelopment (in BNHP) 

Boston Academy of Music, 1150, 1154 
NPS ground maintenance staff. 651 
NPS tenants, 1150 

Sentry House, 662, 813 

WPA projects, 113, 440, 1106 

2 (Wood Shed), 1089, 1091 

3 (Storehouse) 

construction, repair, and improvements, 442, 442n1, 

1058 
demolition, 442n1, 825, 1058-1059, 1097 
Lincoln Ave. paving, 1058 
location, 65, 1058 
Navy Yard purchase of, 24, 1088 
numbering of, 443, 1058 
railroad tracks, 970, 1004, 1026 
in site plan (1841), 442 

4 (CPO Club / Storehouse), 442-445 

Bottled Goods Store, 1204 

Building 5, connections to, 445, 448 

Chief Petty Officers (CPO) Club, 185, 443-445, 447, 
811 

Constitution. USS 

crew quarters, 198 
offices, 185, 445 
visitor parking area, 824 
visitor restrooms, 163, 169 

construction, repair, and improvements 
original construction (1827), 52 
painted walls (19th century), 147 
connection to Building 5 (1952), 448 
wall repairs (1958-1959), 811 
paint removal (1960s). 420. 1128 
demolition of Temporary Addition (1968). 1134 
gas-fired boilers, installation of (1974), 203 
rehabilitation projects (1980s), 230 
roof replacement (1998), 230 

current status, 265 

Labor Board offices, 100 

location, 44S 

Main Gate and, 661, 811 

Naval Reserves, 489, 1106 

Navy Exchange Liquor Store, 443, 533 

at Navy Yard closure. 185 

Navy Yard purchase of. 24, 52, 1088 

numbering of, 1058 

Police Booth. 169 

railroad tracks. 970, 1004, 1026 

signage, 65 

Storehouse, 65 

streetlights, 169 

WPA projects, 443, 1106 

5 [E] (Bachelor Officers Quarters / Open Mess / Navy 

Store / Navy Yard Visitor Center). 446-449 
Antisubmarine School, 448 
Bachelor Officers Club, 163 
Bachelor Officers Quarters, 447-448 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

5 [E] — Continued 

BarberShop, 96, 447 

Boundary Wall and, 742 

British landing site plaque, 15, 1106, 1117 

Building 4, connections to, 52, 442-443, 445 

Captain of the Yard, offices for, 447 

Chaplain, 96, 447 

Commissary, 96, 447 

Commissioned Officers Mess (Open), 448-449 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1813). 16, 60. 1003. 1079 

WPA projects (1930s), 22, 117 

paint removal (1960), 147, 420, 444, 1128 

gas-fired boilers, installation of (1975), 203 

roof replacement (1998), 230 

Navy Yard Visitor Center (2005-2006), 230 
current status, 265, 447 
Dispensary, 60, 65, 447, 590, 1093 
First Naval District offices, 96, 447 
historic significance, 197 
Isaac Hull Room, 448-449 
Labor Board, 65, 1093 
Library, 60, 96, 447 
location in Navy Yard, 56 

location relative to Dry Dock 1, 67, 953, 1093, 1166 
location relative to Fitchburg Slip, 898 
location relative to Main Gate, 65 
location relative to Pier 1, 68 
Main Gate and, 60, 661 
on master plan (1828), 33, 447 
Museum, 65, 96, 447, 1093 
National Register nomination, 197, 385 
Naval Reserve Drill Hall, 447 
Naval Reserves, 489, 1106 
Navy Galley, 1151 

Navy Store, 16, 26, 38, 50, 56, 442, 447 
at Navy Yard closure, 185, 191 
Officers Club, 158, 448-449 
Paint Shop, 60, 447, 1093 
Pay Office, 65, 96, 447, 1093 
Paymaster's Office, 447 
plaque, 362, 546 
in Preble History Gallery, 59 
Preble Room. 254, 448-449, 1200-1201 
Print Shop, 447 
Printing Office, 96, 447 
railroad tracks, 970, 972, 975, 1004, 1026 
redevelopment (in BNHP) 

adaptive reuse plans, 215 

as Constitution, USS, crew quarters, 185, 198- 
199, 202, 246, 448-449 

corporate events, 254 

NPS, plan for, 199 

NPS. use by, 199. 224, 449 

NPS rehabilitation projects, 229-231 
roadway pavers, 1009 
security, 276, 679-680, 685, 904, 1027 
Small and Clothing Stores, 96, 447 
Storerooms. 60 
street signs, 1027, 1030 
streetlights, 169 
streets & roadways, 1003 
visitor services 

Navy Yard Visitor Center, 255 

exhibits, 5, 255, 258-259, 382, 449, 600- 

601, 1130, 1183 
opening, 1156 
refurbishment as, 231 
security, 449, 826 

restrooms, 230, 449 

shuttle buses, 223 
Watchmen's Quarters, 447 
World War II, 447-448 
WPA projects, 109, 113, 118, 447, 1106 

6 [F] (Fire Apparatus & Paint Shop / Blacksmith Shop / 

Storehouse) 
Army, U.S., use by, 18, 1080 
Army ordnance, removal of. 1080 
construction, repair, and improvements, 70, 897 
demolition, 898, 1095 
on master plan (1828), 33 
Pier 1 reconstruction and, 68 

7 (Coal Shed), 68, 574. 897-898, 1088, 1091, 1095 

8 (Smith's Storage / Coal Shed), 1091 

9 (Hoop Furnace), 1089, 1091 

10 (Battery Charging Facility / Pitch House / Paint Shop 

/ Transducer Repair Facility / Shipyard Galley), 450- 
451, 453 
battery changing operation, 699 
Constitution, USS 

maintenance support, 198 

observation deck, 1134 

viewing platform, 158. 176. 186. 1030 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

1 — Continued 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1852-1853), 38, 1086 
sonar test tank addition (1940s), 150, 163, 1116 
shed addition (1952), 1124 
shed demolition (1964). 266. 1128 
gas-fired boilers, installation of (1974), 203 
removal of elevated walkway and stairs (1999), 
230, 1151 

current status, 262, 266 

Industrial Hygiene Laboratory, 460 

location, 58, 67, 170, 580, 897, 900 

National Register nomination photos, 385 

at Navy Yard closure, 186 

Paint Shop, 65, 447, 598 

Pitch House, 50, 58. 65. 580 

radio operations, 452 

railroad tracks, 976-977, 1029 

redevelopment (in BNHP) 
adaptive reuse plans, 215 
Boston Concessions Group lease, 225 
BRA offices, 225 
as food service facility, 230 
New England Historic Seaport, 225, 453 
NPS offices, 224, 579 

relocation, 38n86, 65, 67-68, 899. 1096-1097 

Shipyard Galley, 258, 453, 674, 677, 1148 

sonar test facility 

inadequacies, 163, 722, 931 

sonar test tank. 140, 147, 155, 163, 1116 

streets & roadways, 1029 

Underground Steam Line, 673 

visitor services 

educational programs, 260 

exhibits, 258 

food concessions, 224, 258-259, 674, 677, 1148 

USS Constitution Museum, 176-177, 186 

Welfare Laundry, 96, 452 

Wireless Station, 900, 1098 

WPA projects. 113, 451, 901 

11 (Oil Boiling House), 1089, 1091 

12 (Pitch House / Oil Boiling House), 78, 450-451, 580, 

899. 1096 

13 (Water Closet), 596, 1088, 1091 

14 (Water Closet), 596, 898, 1088, 1091 

15 (Sentry Box / Provision Storehouse), 33, 482 

16 (Coppersmith Shop / Iron Platers Shop) 
construction, repair, and improvements, 38, 65, 1089 
demolition, 65, 899 

Foundry, 65. 1205 

Iron Platers Shop, 65 

location, 67-68, 898-899, 1026, 1029, 1093 

in master plan (1828), 33 

Shed, 65 

in winter, 1093 

18 (Carpenters Shop). 56 

19 (Scale House), 454-455 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1873), 1004, 1089 
scale installation (1902-1903), 1004, 1006 
reconstruction (1919), 87, 637. 639, 973, 1006, 

1104 
scale replacement (1951). 168 
NPS rehabilitation projects. 227, 230, 1145 

current status, 266 

inactivation, 1006, 1137 

location, 57, 452, 669, 762, 990, 1006 

at Navy Yard closure, 186 

numbering of, 87 

Railroad Scale (see Structure 234) 

railroad tracks, 972, 977 

redevelopment (in BNHP) 

NPS entrance station and dispatch center, 221, 

266, 579. 660, 1155 
NPS rehabilitation projects, 227, 230. 1145 

relocation, 452, 1006 

security barriers, 678. 681 

Truck Scale (see Structure 235) 

weighbeam, 638. 640 

weighbridge. 638, 640 

20 [A] (Tool Storage / Commandant's Barn), 96. 757, 

1080, 1091 

21 [A] (Carriage House / Commandant's Stable), 456- 

457 

Boundary Wall and, 96, 740, 742, 744 

Chelsea St. access, 757 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1825). 96, 740. 742, 757, 

1080 
Greenhouse removal (1960s), 96, 757 
NPS rehabilitation projects, 228, 230 

current status. 757 

Greenhouse, 96, 163, 425, 456-457, 757, 1128 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1 077-1 244 = Volume 3 



1257- 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

21 [A] — Continued 
inactivation, 1138 
location. 44 
redevelopment (in BNHP) 

Hull Lifesaving Museum, 225. 260 

Junior League of Boston's Decorator's Show 

House (2004). 225 
NPS rehabilitation projects, 228, 230 
Stable, 96 

22 (55] (Ship Repair Shop / Dry Dock Engine House & 

Saw Mill / USS Constitution Museum), 458-461 

Blockmakers Shop, 60 

Boiler House wing, 96, 460, 466, 1085, 1089 

Building 28, connection to, 468, 1032 

chimney, 60, 96, 174, 1089, 1162 

Coal House, 531 

construction, repair, and improvements 
design, 37, 60 

original construction (1832), 38, 38n88, 1081 
Dry Dock Engine House wing, 38n88 
Saw Mill wing (1837), 38n89, 1084 
plan (1840). 37 

Boiler House addition (1844), 1085 
Boiler House rebuilding, authorization for (1855), 

1087 
Boiler House Chimney addition (1870), 1089 
gas lighting installation (1874), 1089 
engine and pump installation (1891), 1092 
WPA projects, 109, 113, 118, 459 
electrical substation reconstruction (1935), 460 
gas-fired boilers, installation of (1974). 203 
NPS rehabilitation projects, 226, 229-230, 468, 
1032, 1144 

current status, 65, 262, 266, 460 

driveway, 1006 

electrical system, 460, 1144 

flooding, 460 

Historic Structure Report (HSR), 8, 394 

Industrial Hygiene Laboratory, 468 

location relative to Building 28, 97 

location relative to Dry Dock 1, 36, 57, 762, 1093 

location relative to Timber Dock, 995 

location within Navy Yard, 50, 56, 62 

Machine Shop, 60, 65 

on master plan (1828), 33, 38n88, 458, 761 

muster, 470 

National Register nomination, 386 

at Navy Yard closure, 186 

Pier 1 reconstruction and, 68 

portal crane tracks, 968 

in Preble History Gallery, 60 

Public Works Laborers and Mechanics, 96 

Public Works Shop 80, 94 

pump system, 60, 764-765, 1092 

railroad tracks, 71, 977 

redevelopment (in BNHP) 

in national park proposal, 199 

NPS rehabilitation projects. 226, 229-230, 468, 

1032, 1144 
USS Constitution Museum, 177, 202, 266, 461, 
468, 826, 1139 

safety sign, 203 

Saw Mill, 37, 62, 458-459, 583 

Underground Pipe Conduit. 670 

usage (1921), 94 

WPA projects. 109, 113, 118, 459 

23 |64, later 67) (Water Closets / Steam Chest / Chapel 

/ Plumbers Shop) 

Chapel, 38n89, 60. 462 

construction, repair, and improvements 
original construction (1833), 1081 
Oil (Painters Boiling) House addition (1841). 38. 

60. 1085 
rebuilding as Latrine (1900s), 38n89, 97, 1021, 
1098 

demolition, 97, 122, 130, 464 

location, 462-463, 995, 1048 

during Marine Railway construction, 831 

Oil Boiling House, 60, 1085 

Plumbers Shop, 1094 

in Preble History Gallery, 60 

relocation, 38n89. 60, 80. 97, 467, 1055, 1098 

as Steam Box, 60 

in winter, 1094 

24 (Riggers & Laborers Shop), 462-465 
Carpenters Shop, 463 
clerestory, 75 

compressed air line, 382 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1847-1849), 38, 60. 1085 
gas lighting installation (1874), 1089 
reconstruction after fire (1913), 75, 80, 1099 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 
24 

construction, repair, and improvements — Continued 
East Extension (World War II). 464, 469, 597. 

1032, 1112 
Riggers Loft addition (World War II), 130 
gas-fired boilers, installation of (1974), 203 
NPS rehabilitation projects, 229, 231, 465 

current status, 262, 266 

fire (1910), 75. 459. 1098 

Galvanizing Shop lean-to, 60, 462-463 

HAER documentation, 210 

historic significance, 219 

light tower, 644, 646 

location, justification for, 462 

location relative to Building 28, 97 

location relative to Building 287, 680 

location relative to Fitchburg Slip, 898 

location relative to Pier 3 Marginal Wharf, 916 

location relative to Shear Wharf, 1162 

location relative to Structure 238 (light tower), 645 

location relative to Structure 239 (light tower), 646 

location relative to Timber Dock, 63, 995 

location within Navy Yard. 38, 50, 56, 62 

lunchstand demolition, 1137 

machine room, 833 

Marine Railway and. 93. 464-465, 830-831, 835 

National Register nomination, 385-386 

Naval Constructor's office, 1047 

at Navy Yard closure, 183, 186, 189 

as Office Building, 66, 75 

Pier 1 reconstruction and, 68 

Plumbers & Tinners Shop, 466 

portal crane tracks, 968, 1098 

with portal cranes, 958 

in Preble History Gallery, 60 

radio station, 451 

recommendations for, 6, 391 

redevelopment (in BNHP) 

Constitution, USS, maintenance support for, 198, 

202, 585, 1137 
John F. Kennedy Library proposal, 259, 1138 
Navy offices, 1048 

NPS rehabilitation projects, 229, 231, 465 
visitor attraction plans, 259 

Rigging Loft, 66, 94, 463-464, 1184 

Sail Loft, 464-465, 479, 489 

signage, 600 

temporary work shed, 174 

usage (1921), 94 

in winter, 1094 

World War I, 83 
25 (Smiths Shop & Cart Shed) 

Blacksmiths Shop, 58, 62 

construction, repair, and improvements, 38, 598, 1085, 
1090 

demolition, 1090, 1092 

location, 58, 62, 598 

relocation, 38, 1090 
28 [68] (Instrumentation Calibration Shop / Coal Shed / 
Plumbers & Tinners Shop / Electric Light Plant / 
Restaurant / USS Constitution Museum), 466-469 

Building 22, connection to, 468, 1032 

Coal House, 66 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1849), 38, 66, 531, 1085 
Plumbers & Tinners Shop addition (1866), 38, 

66, 1088-1089 
Electric Light Plant, conversion to (1895), 66 
removal of southern bays (1900s), 80, 87, 1055. 

1098 
addition of northern bays (1918), 87, 97, 1102 
gas-fired boilers, installation of (1974), 203 
NPS rehabilitation projects, 226-227, 229-230, 
1144 

Crowley's Restaurant, 490 

current status, 266 

Dry Dock 2 construction and, 69 

Electric Light Plant. 66. 562, 1092 

HAER documentation, 210 

inactivation, 1138 

Industrial Hygiene Laboratory. 460, 468 

location relative to Baxter Rd , 1048 

location relative to Building 24, 1094 

location relative to Building 29, 60 

location relative to Timber Dock, 995 

location within Navy Yard, 56, 62 

on master plan (1828). 466 

at Navy Yard closure. 186 

original purpose. 38, 66 

Plumbers & Tinners Shop, 56, 66, 466 

Plumbers Shop, 466 

portal crane tracks, 80, 87, 960, 1055, 1098 

Quality Assurance Office, 484 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

28 [68) — Continued 
railroad tracks, 1004 
Recreation Room, 97 
redevelopment (in BNHP) 

North Atlantic Historic Preservation Center. 226, 

1144 
NPS rehabilitation projects, 226-227, 229-230. 

1144 
USS Constitution Museum, 177, 225-226, 461. 
1150 
Reference Standards Laboratory, 468 
Restaurant, 97, 1098, 1202 
Tinners, Plumbers & Coppersmiths Shop. 60. 62 
Tinners Shop, 466 
in winter, 1094 

29 [R] (Commandant's Office / Dry Dock Office) 
Commandant's Office, 60: 62, 475 
condemnation, 472, 1092 

Dry Dock Office, 60 

location, 62, 618, 827, 995, 1010, 1029 
in Preble History Gallery, 60 
relocation, 618, 827, 1087 
replacement, 1092 

30 (Marine Corps Officer of the Day Office), 18. 429, 1089, 

1094, 1098 

31 (Telephone Exchange / Muster House). 470-473 
appraisal photos, 1140 

Boundary Wall and, 742 

Captain of the Watch, 97 

Civil Engineer's offices, 60 

Clock Tower, 197 

construction, repair, and improvements 

design by Navy Dept. 40n93 

original construction (1853), 40. 816, 1086 

enlargement (1871). 40, 40n93, 51, 60, 1089 

porch removal (1920s). 97 

additions (World War II), 122, 130. 186. 1112 

replacement plans (1958), 480 

BRA demolition of additions (1970s), 130, 473. 
1144 

BRA restoration (1980s-1990s), 236. 473, 1145 
1151 
current status, 266, 270 
Dry Dock 2 construction and, 69 
HAER documentation, 207 
Hearing Clinic, 473 
location, 586, 1010, 1094 
Muster House. 60. 97, 1094 
National Register nomination, 386 
at Navy Yard closure, 186 
Ordnance Shop, 1112 
in Preble History Gallery, 60 
recommendations for, 6, 391-392 
redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 

BRA and 

demolition of additions, 130. 473. 1144 
lease agreements. 473, 1150-1151 
offices, 453, 481 
restoration, 236, 473, 1145, 1151 
reuse study, 232 

Courageous Sailing Center, 481 

NPS boundary study, 199 

preservation guidelines, 205n451 
in Shore Station Development Plan (1940s), 155 
switchboard. 501. 1092 
Telephone Exchange. 97, 472 
in winter, 1094 

32 (Bank / Shell House / Commandant s Office / Boston 

Marine Society). 474-476 

Commandant's Office. 75. 80. 475. 1092 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1856), 40, 61, 1087 

conversion to Commandants Office (1891), 75 

addition (1910). 75. 80, 1098 

addition (1918), 87, 97. 1102 

addition (1919), 1104 

addition (World War II), 476 

gas-fired boilers, installation of (1974), 203 

NPS rehabilitation projects (1985), 228, 230 

current status, 266-267 

Dry Dock 2 construction and, 69 

explosion, 1088 

First Ave road construction and, 1005 

inactivation, 1138 

location, 62, 71. 452. 586. 618-619. 995 

National Register nomination, 386 

National Shawmut Bank, 476, 1124, 1137, 1184 

at Navy Yard closure, 1 86 

Navy Yard Employees Credit Union, 186, 267 476 

Pay & Disbursing Office, 87 

Pay Office. 97 

Paymaster, 475-476 

Personnel Department Compensation section, 476 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1 244 = Volume 3 



1258 



Index 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

32 — Continued 

in Preble History Gallery, 61 

redevelopment (in BNHP) 

Boston Marine Society, 226. 258, 476-477, 1145 

BRA offices, 225, 476, 1139 

in national park proposal, 199 

in NPS General Management Plan, 215 

NPS rehabilitation projects. 228, 230 

Safety Engineer. 476 

Safety Shoe Store, 267, 476, 491 

Shell House, 61-62 

in Shore Station Development Plan (1940s), 155 

Underground Pipe Conduit, 669 

in winter, 1094 

33 (24] (Bachelor Enlisted Quarters / Frazier Barracks / 

Sail Loft / Billings Building), 478-481 
appraisal photos, 1140 
Boiler House wing, 558, 1098 
Building 38, connection to. 187, 480, 493-495 
bunks and lockers, 559, 1194 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1852), 40-41, 40n95, 
1085-1086 

gas lighting installation (1874), 1089 

Boiler House addition, 77 

Boiler House demolition (1905), 1098 

WPA projects, 109, 118 

additions (World War II), 122, 130, 480, 1037, 
1112 

renovations (1950s), 480 

remodeling (1960s), 481 

BRA demolition of additions (1970s), 130, 481, 
1037, 1144 

rehabilitation (1987), 481, 1147 
current status, 267 
East Extension, 480-481, 1037 
Equipment Department, 478 
Frazier Barracks, 479, 491, 619. 1112 
HAER documentation. 207 
Joiners Shop, 479, 489 
location, 38, 471, 1010 
lockers, 559 

on master plan (1828), 41, 478 
Mess Hall, 1213 
Mold Loft, 479 

National Register nomination, 386 
at Navy Yard closure, 187 
North Extension (see Building 33A) 
Plumbers Shop, 479 
Receiving Station, 296, 1106, 1109, 1205 
Receiving Stores. 478-479 
redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 

Billings Building, 481 

BRA and 

building demolition, 130, 481, 1037, 1144 
development rights award, 481, 1145 
lease, 1147, 1149, 1151 
offices, 481 
reuse study, 232 

Navy Yard 33 (apartments), 481 

Navy Yard Plaza, 238 

as offices, 247, 481, 1156 

preservation requirements, 205n451 

rehabilitation, 481, 1147 

residential use, 247, 481, 1156 
renaming, 1106 
Roofing Shop, 479 

Sail Loft, 38, 94. 97. 478-479, 492, 1218 
Store House, 97, 605 
Supply Dept. storage, 94 
Upholstery Shop, 479 
usage (1921), 94 

Vegetable Preparation Room, 479-481 
WPA projects, 109, 118 
33A (Dispensary), 130. 479-480. 1018, 1116 

34 [15] (Quality Assurance Facility / Storehouse / Parris 

Building), 482-483, 485 
American Industrial Radium and X-Ray Society, 1108 
American Society for Nondestructive Testing Historic 

Landmark designation, 482, 485, 1148 
Blueprint and Reproduction Room, 483 
Chemical Laboratory, 94, 97, 483-484 
construction, repair, and improvements 
design, 40, 61, 496 

original construction (1837), 40, 40n96. 61. 1084 
additions (World War II), 130, 483 
roof replacement (1956), 483 
rehabilitation (1986), 241, 243, 486. 1147 
current status, 267 

First Ave road construction and, 1005 
HAER documentation, 207, 485, 487 
Hull & Machinery Division, 483 
ice removal, 1036 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

34 [15] — Continued 
location, 37-38, 452, 1140 
lunch room, 94 

on master plan (1828), 33, 482, 1004 

Materials Laboratory, 483-484 

Metallurgical Laboratory, 483 

National Register nomination, 386-387 

at Navy Yard closure, 187, 483, 1178 

Officer-of-the-Day, 97 

Photographic Laboratory, 483 

Physical Testing Laboratory, 484 

Post Office, 94. 97, 483 

in Preble History Gallery, 61 

Public Works Officer's parking space, 1178 

Quality Assurance Division, 483-484 

redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 

BRA and 

development rights, awarding of, 481, 483, 

1145 
lease, 1146 
partial demolition, 130 
reuse study, 232 

Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, 243, 
485 

MGH Institute of Health Professions, 243 

Navy Yard Bistro. 259 

Navy Yard Plaza, 238 

Parris Building, 483 

preservation guidelines, 205n451, 483, 486 

rehabilitation, 241, 243, 486, 1147 

restaurants, 259, 485 

Store 24 (convenience store), 244, 485 
Shipyard Laboratories, 483 
in Shore Station Development Plan (1940s), 155 
steam heating, 478 
Storehouse, 38, 61, 94, 97, 483, 605 
Trade School, 94, 97 
Transportation Officer, 97 
usage (1921), 94 
World War II, 130, 132, 483 
WPA offices, 483 

35 (Shed for Sighting Guns), 61, 1003, 1091 

36 (Cafeteria / Joiners Shop / Ironsides Place / Catherine 

Filene Shouse Building), 488-491 
appraisal photo, 1140 
Block Shop, 98 

Boiler House, 61, 78, 98, 119, 489 
Cabinet Shop, 98 

Civilian Cafeteria, 148, 164, 489, 490, 1107 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1866), 40, 52, 61, 1088 

gas lighting installation (1874), 1089 

doorway construction and enlargement (1898), 
66 

WPA projects, 109, 113, 489, 1106 

Boiler House demolition (1941), 119, 489 

Steam Cleaning (1947), 164 

rehabilitation (1985), 491 

rehabilitation (1995), 1146 

roof replacement (2005), 491 
current status, 223. 267 
First Ave. paving, 1005 
galley and mess hall, 480-481 
HAER documentation, 207, 491 
Joiners Shop, 62, 66. 94. 98. 488-489, 1188, 1210 
Joiners Shop & Paint Loft, 40, 56, 61 
location in Navy Yard, 52, 56, 62, 148, 1094 
location relative to 8th St.. 1038 
location relative to Dry Dock 2, 173 
location relative to Shipyard Park, 998 
location relative to Timber Dock, 995 
Mold Loft, 489 
at Navy Yard closure, 187 
Painters Loft, 40, 56, 61, 488 
in Preble History Gallery, 61 
Production Division Storage, 1106 
railroad tracks, 970, 974, 1004, 1006 
recommendations for, 7, 392 
redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 

BRA and 

developer, designation of, 1145-1146 
on large-scale model of Navy Yard, 233 
lease, 491, 1146, 1151 
in Master Plan (1975), 234 
reuse study. 232. 259 

Children's Quarters. 238n617, 491 

day care centers, 238. 238n617. 491 

food services, 259 

Incubator Associates, 491 

Ironsides Place, 491, 1146 

John F. Kennedy Library proposal. 233-234. 259, 
1138 

Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, 243 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 
36 

redevelopment — Continued 

MGH Institute of Health Professions, 491 
preservation guidelines, 205n451. 491 
rehabilitation, 491, 1146 
shuttle buses, 223 
Safety Shoe Sign, 7, 654-655, 1133 
Safety Shoe Store, 491, 655 
Sail Loft, 148, 164, 465, 489 
Shipwrights Shop, 489 

in Shore Station Development Plan (1940s), 155 
Upholstery Shop, 98, 479 
usage (1921), 94 
in winter, 1094 
World War I, 83 

WPA projects, 109, 113, 489, 1106 
36A (Electrical Substation). 489, 491 

37 (Returned Stores Inspection Shed), 40. 557-558, 

1088, 1092 

38 [25] (Navy Exchange / Movie Hall / Cooperage / Prison 

/ Cooper Building). 492-495 
adjoining structures, 166 
Building 33, connection to, 187, 480, 1140 
Chapel, 98, 1021 
Chaplain's offices, 493 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1857), 40, 40n99, 509, 

1086-1087 
gas lighting installation (1874), 1089 
washroom addition (1890s), 98 
WPA projects, 109, 114, 118, 493. 1106 
BRA demolition of additions (1978), 130, 1144 
rehabilitation (1993). 1149 
Cooper Building, 495 
Cooperage, 40, 56. 492-493 
current status, 267 
dogs outside, 1177 
Enlisted Men's Club, 494 
Enlisted Men's Library, 494 
fire, 1139 

Forklift Repair Shop, 494 
Frazier Barracks, access from, 493 
Garage Repair Shop, 493-494, 1106 
HAER documentation, 207, 495 
Ingram Club, 493 
location, 56, 1140 
on master plan (1828), 40n99, 492 
Movie Hall, 493-494. 609 
Naval Prison, 98, 492-494, 1091, 1096 
Navy Exchange, 492-494, 536, 641, 1204 
at Navy Yard closure, 187 
Packing House, 40, 56. 493 
Recreation Hall, 494 

redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 
BRA and 

demolition of additions, 130, 1144 
development rights, awarding of, 481, 494. 

1145 
lease agreements, 494-495, 1147, 1149- 

1150 
office condominium, approval for. 1156 
reuse study, 232 

Cooper Leasehold Condominium, 495. 1156 
master deed, 1156 
Navy Yard Plaza. 238 
preservation guidelines. 205n451 
rehabilitation, 1149 
Storehouse, 98, 493 
Water Closet, 493 
World War II, 130 
WPA projects. 109, 114, 118, 493, 1106 

39 (Administration Building / Ordnance Store / Carriage 

Building) 496-500, 503-504 

Accounting Department, 502 

Accounting Division, 499 

Accounting Officer, 497 

Administrative Offices, 501, 503 

Armory, 498-499 

Building 150. bridge to, 164 

Captain of the Yard's Office, 497, 499 

Central Files, 497 

Central Offices, 497 

Commandant's Office, 164, 497-500, 1099 

Computer Applications Support & Development Of- 
fice (CASDO). 499. 503 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1866), 40, 52. 1088 
gas lighting installation (1874), 1089 
doorway enlargement (1914), 498 
reroofing (1916), 1036 
WPA projects, 109, 498 

extension (World War II), 122. 130, 499. 1012- 
1013, 1107, 1112 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1 244 = Volume 3 



- 1259 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Charleslown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 
39 

construction, repair, and improvements — Continued 

modernization (1950s), 164 

BRA demolition of additions, 130, 504, 1014, 
1144 

rehabilitation (1988), 1148 
Construction Officer's office, 497 
Cost Account Branch, 500 
current status, 267 
Design Division, 500, 502, 1129 
Drafting Room. 498-500 

Electronic Data Processing Machine room, 164 
Estimating & Planning, 499 
fire escape. 1140 
First Naval District offices, 1107 
General Storekeeper's offices, 493, 497-498 
Hull Division, 498 
Industrial Offices, 94 
Inspection Officer, 497 
Inspector of Ordnance offices, 496 
location, 52, 56, 62, 995, 1011, 1015 
on master plan (1828), 496 
at Navy Yard closure, 187 
Ordnance Dept., 61, 483, 496 
Ordnance Store, 56, 61. 496 
Planning & Estimating, 498 
in Preble History Gallery, 61 
Production Division, 499 
Public Works Officer, 497 
Receiving Station, 479, 1105-1106 
redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 

BRA and 

demolition of additions, 130, 504, 1014, 1144 
development rights, awarding of, 481, 1145 
lease agreements, 1147 
preservation guidelines, 205n451, 213, 504 
reuse study, 232 

Carriage Building, 1148 

damage by MDG Contractors, 1139 

food services, 259 

Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, 243 

MGH Institute of Health Professions, 243 

Navy Yard Plaza, 238 

rehabilitation, 1148 

removal of furnishings, 194, 504 
steam line to Building 40, 497 
street lights, 1140 
street sign, 1037 
Underground Pipe Conduit, 669 
usage (1921), 94 
World War II building extensions, 122, 130, 499, 

1012-1013, 1107, 1112 
WPA projects, 109, 498 
39A (Parcel 39A), 244, 247, 249, 505, 1154 
40 (Temporary Service Shop / Heavy Hammer House / 
Chain Forge / Mold Loft), 506-507 
Anchor Shop, 506, 1094 
Angle (Angle Bending) Shop, 94, 507 
archival materials, 1187 
Chain Forge, 75, 77, 510, 549, 1099 
Chain Shop, 105, 506 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1864), 40-41. 52, 61, 510, 
1088 

addition (1903), 75, 80, 538, 1028, 1040, 1096- 
1097, 1099 

WPA projects, 114, 512-513, 1006 

restoration (1982), 507 
current status, 268 
Equipment Dept,, 506 
Equipment Shops, 80 
Forge Shop, 56 
HAER documentation, 507 
Heavy Hammer House, 40-41, 52, 61 
location, 55-56, 515, 995, 1094 
Mold Loft, 94, 489, 507, 622 
at Navy Yard closure, 187 
in Preble History Gallery, 61 
railroad tracks, 164, 976 
redevelopment (in New Development Area) 

Boston Caretaker Group, 627 

BRA and 

design guidelines, 507 
restoration, 507 
reuse study, 232 

damage by MDG Contractors, 1139 

Parris Landing condominiums parking garage, 
268. 507 
Rolling Mill. 55-56, 61, 1094 
steam line, 497 
usage (1921), 94 
in winter. 1094 
WPA projects, 114, 512-513, 1006 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

Numbered Buildings & Structures — Continued 

41 (Creosotmg Plant / Boiler Storage). 61, 1089, 1091- 

1092 

42 (Foundry & Machine Shop / Parris Landing), 508-51 5 
Boiler Shop, 61. 509, 1099 

Brass and Iron Foundry, 61 
chainmaking operations, 506, 538 
as character-defining feature, 374 
construction, repair, and improvements 

landfill for (1840s-1850s), 24 

original construction (1858), 40, 1086-1087 

improvements and enlargement (Civil War era), 
40, 52 

gas lighting installation (1874), 1089 

iron roof (1899), 1095 

Machine Shop No 1, reconstruction of (1901- 
1903), 80. 509. 1096-1097 

Machine Shop No 2, replacement of (1 904), 80, 
1097 

improvements (1907), 1098 

expansion (World War I), 85, 87, 1102 

improvements and reconstruction (1919), 1104 

extension (1921), 98 

extensions (1930s-1940s). 109. 119, 507, 1006, 
1028, 1107 

WPA projects, 114, 118-119 

additions (World War II), 130 

addition, proposed (1966), 157 

extension (1967-1968), 158, 165 
current status, 42, 268 

employee washroom and locker space, 996-997 
Forge & Chain Shop, 107 
Forge Shop, 506 
Foundry, 509 

HAER documentation, 211, 514 
location in Navy Yard, 52, 55, 62 
location relative to Building 103, 1172 
location relative to Building 113, 78 
location relative to Building 152, 91 
location relative to Building 196, 117 
location relative to Building 197, 925 
location relative to Dock St., 1052 
location relative to Pier 4A, 921 
location relative to Pier 7 (ex-Pier 6), 930 
location relative to quay wall, 57 
location relative to Timber Dock, 995 
Machine, Boiler, and Pattern Shops, 61 
Machine Shop, 61 
Machine Shop & Foundry, 148 
Machine Shop complex, description of. 41-42 
Machine Shop No. 1, 1103 
Machine Shop No. 2 replacement, 1097 
Machine Shops, 509, 1095, 1210 
on master plan (1828). 508n1 
National Register nomination, 387 
at Navy Yard closure, 187 
Pattern Shop, 61 
Pier 1 reconstruction and, 68 
in Preble History Gallery, 61 
railroad tracks, 66, 970-971 
redevelopment (in New Development Area) 

BRA land disposition agreement, 1154 

in BRA reuse study, 232 

Constitution Quarters, 237, 240, 246-247, 514- 
515, 1145 (see also Parris Landing Con 
dominium) 

conveyed to Building 42 Associates. 1144 

demolition (partial), 380 

landscaping, 240 

master deed. 1155 

parking garage for. 507 

Parris Landing Condominium, 247, 268, 380, 
515, 1028, 1039, 1155 (see also Constitu- 
tion Quarters) 

preservation requirements, 205 
in Shore Station Development Plan (1940s), 155 
Smithery, 61, 66, 509 
streets & roadways, 1038, 1140 
Underground Pipe Conduit, 670 
usage (1921), 94 
in winter. 1094 
WPA projects. 114. 118-119 
42-A (Machine Shop No. 1) 
alphabetical designation, 511 
construction, repair, and improvements, 75, 114, 511- 

512, 1107 
HAER photos, 514 
redevelopment, 514. 514n1, 515 
42-B (Machine Shop No 2), 75, 511-512, 514-515, 1134 
42-C (Foundry) 

alphabetical designation, 511 

construction, repair, and improvements, 104, 155. 164, 

511-512, 1105, 1116 
HAER documentation. 514 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 
42-C — Continued 

Lean-to, 512, 514-515 
redevelopment, 514, 514n1, 515 
in Shore Station Development Plan (1940s), 155 
42-D (Boiler and Blacksmith Shop), 511-512 
42-E (Pattern Shop / Tool Shop / Boiler Shop), 511-514, 

543 
42-F (Copper and Pipe Shops), 511-512 
42-G (X-Ray Facility), 513, 1028 
42-N, 514, 514n1, 515 
42-S, 514, 514n1 

43 (Boiler House) 
Chimney, 41, 55, 1094 

construction, repair, and improvements. 40-41 1086- 

1088, 1097 
demolition, 85, 87, 511-512, 596, 1102 
location, 42, 510 
in winter, 1094 

44 (Shed / Coppersmiths Shop), 62, 98, 1 038-1 089, 1 095 

45 (Engine Repair Shop). 62. 1088 

46 (Spare Machinery Shed / Water Closet), 62. 1089 

47 (Waterfront Office / Shell House) 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1863), 40 
Waterfront Offices, conversion to. 98 
WPA projects, 109, 114, 921, 1106 

control of ship movement, 577 

demolition, 921 

Heavy Shell House, 56. 62, 98 

location, 56, 62. 577. 994-995, 1053 

Waterfront Offices, 98 

WPA projects, 109, 114, 921, 1106 

48 (Magazine) 

construction, repair, and improvements, 40, 1088 

demolition, 658 

location in Navy Yard, 56, 62 

location on Ordnance Wharf, 994-995 

location relative to Pier 4A, 921 

location relative to Structure 261 (Saluting Battery Gun 

Mount), 658 
roof shape, 921 
usage (1921), 98 

49 (Saluting Battery Shed) 

construction, repair, and improvements, 40, 1098 

demolition, 658, 1095 

design, 40, 658 

location, 52, 56, 62, 994-995 

Saluting Battery, 920 

50 (Boilers & Machinery Shed), 1091 

51 (Yards & Docks Shed / Storehouse), 56, 1091 

52 (Ropewalk Boiler House) (see also Building 96) 
Building 79, bridge to, 47 

construction, repair, and improvements 

proposals for (1860), 524 

design. 535-536 

original construction (1870s), 40, 45 518, 532, 
1089 

addition for Industrial Relations Office (1943), 47 
demolition, 535-536 
Flirtation Walk, 47 
in Preble History Gallery, 62 
replaced by Power House (Building 96), 45, 532. 536 

53 (Shed for Mason). 1091 

54 [26] (Shed / Yards & Docks Woodworking & Machine 

Shop), 609. 1088, 1092 

55 (Cart Shed), 1091 

56 (Brick Barn) 
anchor storage, 57 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1849-1850), 40, 61, 562. 

1085 
enlargement (1866), 40, 61, 558. 562. 1088 
alteration as Cart Shed (1897). 1092 

demolition, 78, 80, 131, 563 

location, 56, 558 

in Preble History Gallery, 61 

usage, 61, 562-563 

57 (Shed for Carriages / Gun Carnage Shed), 57, 61, 

558, 1089, 1092 

58 [28] (Ropewalk / Industrial Relations Office), 43, 45- 

48, 516-522 
appraisal photos. 1141-1142 
archival materials, 1176, 1179. 1181, 1189 
Boundary Fence and, 739 
Boundary Wall and, 28-29, 737. 742-743 
bridges. 518. 525. 1024 
Building 62, bridge to, 62 
Building 79, connection to. 534, 1141 
as character-defining feature 4, 372, 374 
closure, 153 
Coal House, 531 
coal house (proposed), 466 



Pages 1 -394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1 077-1 244 = Volume 3 



1 260 



Index 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

58 |28] — Continued 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1834-1837), 40, 40n109. 

1084, 1121-1122 
plan (1841), 46 

second-story addition (1865). 1088, 1121 
gas lighting installation (1874), 1089 
second-story extension (1910), 76, 80, 1098 
additions (World War II), 120, 130. 1058, 1112 
BRA demolition of additions (1970s), 130, 240, 
522, 1144 

current status, 268 

demolition (proposed. 1960s), 217-218, 1041 

designed by Parris, 40. 43. 46 

employees. 1116 

fire, 245-246, 522, 739, 1154 

Tire protection, 1098 

Flirtation Walk, 524 

garages, 592 

Gate 4 and, 816-817 

HABS documentation, 383, 1189 

HAER documentation. 208. 520 

Headhouse, 62, 99 

historic significance, 3, 48, 197 

Industrial Relations Office, 29, 443, 520, 739. 1142 

inventory evaluation, 396 

length, 99 

location. 1041 

machinery disposal, 205-206 

on master plan (1828), 33, 40n109, 43, 516-517, 1084 

move to Chelsea (proposed), 45. 52, 518,1082, 1089 

National Register nomination, 7, 197, 361, 387, 389, 
393 

Navy inspection of. 1112 

at Navy Yard closure, 188 

in Navy Yard statement of significance, iii, 3. 360 

in Preble History Gallery. 62 

railroad tracks. 972 

railroad tracks (proposed), 975 

recommendations for, 6, 392 

redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 
BNHP, inclusion in, 196, 198, 522, 1145 
BRA and 

demolition of additions, 130, 240, 522, 1144 
Memorandum of Agreement with NPS, 1139 
reuse study. 232 
transfer to, 522 
as business incubator. 1155 
as exhibit space (proposed), 215, 246, 258 
fire, 245. 522, 1154 
in national park proposal, 199 
NPS, proposed transfer to, 219, 1139 
NPS-BRA joint development, 380 
NPS management of (proposed), 245n637 
preservation guidelines, 205n451 , 245, 522, 573, 

1154 
renovation costs, 258 
theme museum (proposed), 215, 383 
traffic realignment and, 1032 

replacement plans, 480 

as research and development facility, 194 

rope made by, 1091 

ropemaking process, 46 

size, 1121 

steam line, 568 

usage (1921). 94 

utility pole, 535 

59 (Tar Pit), 1088 

60 (29] (Public Works Storage / Tarring House), 523-524 
appraisal photos, 1141 

archival materials, 1189 

bridges. 518. 525 

Building 62, connection to, 99 

as character-defining feature, 4, 372, 374 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1838), 40, 40n110, 1084 
removal of south wing (central pavilion) (World 

War II), 47. 166, 1023-1024 
plan, 46 

current status, 268 

demolition (proposed). 1128 

design, attributed to Parris, 40 

HABS documentation, 383, 1189 

HAER documentation, 208, 524 

inactivation, 1128 

location, 47, 517, 930 

on master plan (1828). 33. 40n110. 523, 1084 

National Register nomination photos, 387 

at Navy Yard closure. 188 

nomenclature, 523n1 

radio tower, 452 

railroad tracks, 47 

recommendations for, 6, 392 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

60 [29] — Continued 

redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 
in BRA reuse study, 232 
design guideline amendments, 1154 
inclusion in BNHP, 196, 1145 
in national park proposal, 199 
NPS-BRA joint development. 380 
preservation guidelines, 205n451 

relocation, 517. 1084 

ropemaking activity, consolidation of, 522 

streets & roadways, 526, 1024 

tarring process, 45 

usage (1921), 94 

61 (Angle-Bending Mill / Angle-Bending Furnace), 554, 

1089, 1092 

62 [27] (Ropewalk & Test Laboratory / Hemp House), 

525-527 
appraisal photos. 1141 
Building 58. bridge to, 62, 518, 525, 1024 
Building 60, connections to, 99 
Building 77, conveyor bridge to, 526, 621-623, 1043 
Building 199, conveyor bridge to, 624, 1044, 1141, 

1143 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1837), 40, 40n111. 1084 
additions (proposed, 1900s), 532 
Wire Rope Mill addition (1910-1911), 48, 80, 
1022, 1099 
authorization for, 525, 536, 1097 
numerical designation, 80n198, 526 
site dispute, 525-526. 532 
rehabilitation (1994). 527, 1149 
current status, 268, 271 
HAER documentation, 208, 527 
Hemp House, 62, 80, 90 
hemp storage, 45 
inactivation, 1137 

location relative to Building 58 (Ropewalk), 517 
location relative to Fourth Ave,, 1019 
on master plan (1828), 40n111, 525-526, 1084 
National Register nomination photos, 387, 390 
at Navy Yard closure, 188, 190 
in Preble History Gallery, 62 
railroad tracks, 47, 1019 
redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 
BRA and 

demolition of bridge to Building 199, 527, 

1141 
developer, designation of, 527, 1146 
lease to Building 62 Corp.. 1149 
lease to Building 62 LP, 527, 1147 
lease to MGH Professional Services, 243, 

527, 1149 
reuse study, 232 
landscaping, 527 

preservation guidelines, 205n451, 527 
streetlight, 1142 
relocation, 517, 523, 1084 
ropemaking, consolidation of, 522 
streets & roadways, 1023-1024 
usage (1921), 94 
Wire Rope Mill, 47, 76 

63 [31] (Timber Shed) 

construction, repair, and improvements, 40, 40n112, 

528, 603, 1042, 1081 
demolition, 85, 89, 529, 604, 1019, 1102 
fire. 85n219, 1018, 1099 
location, 56, 563, 602, 1018, 1040 
on master plan (1828), 40n112, 528 
railroad tracks, 972 
replacement, 972 

64 [33[ (Timber Shed) 

construction, repair, and improvements, 40, 40n113, 

528, 602-603. 1042, 1081 
demolition, 529, 1018, 1102 
fire, 85n219, 603, 1102 
location, 56, 549, 602-603, 1040 
on master plan (1828), 40n113, 528 
railroad tracks, 972 
removal, 85, 89 
replacement, 972 

65 (Grindstone House), 546, 1089. 1092 

66 (Tar House / Iron Platers Shop / Timber-Bending Mill) 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1872), 40, 55. 62. 547, 1089 
reconstruction after fire (1900), 66, 76, 1095 

demolition. 66. 76, 80. 549 

fire. 1095 

Iron Platers Shop. 62, 76, 542, 1092 

location, 56, 446. 546-547 

in Preble History Gallery, 62 

as Timber-Bending Mill, 55-56. 62. 66 

timber made by, 1091 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

Numbered Buildings & Structures — Continued 

67 (Saw Mill) 

construction, repair, and improvements, 40, 62, 459. 

1088-1089 
demolition, 62. 76, 80, 842, 1098 
location, 56, 547, 772, 843 
in Preble History Gallery, 62 
railroad tracks, 971 
relocation, 62. 66. 76. 842. 1096 
renumbering of, 62, 1098 
replacement, 583 

68 [H] (Shiphouse / West Shiphouse) 
in art, 23 

bridges to other buildings, 1052 

Building 103 construction and, 539 

construction, repair, and improvements, 24, 67, 980, 

1080, 1086 
demolition. 1052, 1098 
finger piers, 851 
land side, 67 

launch of USS Hartford, 980-981 
launch of USS Merrimack, 49 
launching ways, 1081 
location in Navy Yard, 37, 52, 55. 62. 538 
location relative to Building 104, 77. 541 
location relative to Pier 7 (ex-Pier 6), 930 
location relative to guay wall. 57 
on master plan (1828). 33, 980 
mentioned, 22 
railroad tracks, 970 

replacement by modern Shipways, 23, 81, 538, 543 
shipbuilding, 830n1, 981, 1080, 1086 
Smithery O, causeway to, 1081 

69 (Boat Shed & Privy), 596 

71 [I] (Shiphouse / East Shiphouse) 
in art, 23 

bridges to other buildings, 1052 

construction, repair, and improvements, 23-24, 842, 

1003, 1080 
demolition, 23, 843, 846, 1098 
finger piers, 851 

location in Navy Yard, 29, 37, 52, 55, 62 
location relative to Building 104. 77, 541 
location relative to Pier 7 (ex-Pier 6), 930 
location relative to Pier 9, 852 
location relative to guay wall, 57 
location relative to Timber Dock, 1003 
on master plan (1828), 33 
mentioned, 22 
purpose, 842 
railroad tracks, 843, 970 
retention as building way, 543 
shipbuilding, 23, 55, 1080 
Smithery O, causeway to, 1080 
street access, 1003 
water side, 67 

72 (Coal House), 574, 897, 1089, 1091 

73 [39] (Shiphouse) 
Building Slip, 772 

construction, repair, and improvements, 23-24, 842 

demolition, 1095 

finger piers, 851 

first use, 23 

location, 52, 55-56, 62, 554, 842-843 

as Marine Railway 11 location (proposed), 830 

on master plan (1828), 33 

mentioned, 22 

replacement, 66 

shipbuilding, 1085, 1097 

74 (Steam Chest), 1092 

75 [38] (Storage / Timber Shed). 528-530 
appraisal photos, 1141 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1831), 40. 40n116, 67, 
1042. 1081 

drain line work (1914), 74 

rehabilitation (1994), 530. 1015, 1018. 1149 
current status, 268 
dating, 528n1 
HAER documentation, 208 
landscaping. 1015 
location in Navy Yard, 55 
location relative to 16th St., 1045-1046 
location relative to Building 131, 863 
location relative to Building 144, 863 
location relative to Building 187, 91, 1017 
location relative to Second Ave , 1011-1012 
on master plan (1828). 40n116. 528 
National Register mmination photos, 387 
at Navy Yard closure, 188 
original purpose, 40, 67 
redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 

BRA and 

development rights, awarding of, 232 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1 077-1 244 = Volume 3 



- 1261 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

75 [38] 

redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 
BRA and — Continued 

lease to BioLease Inc., 232, 243, 530, 1149 
lease transferred to Massachusetts Biomedi- 
cal Research Corp . 243, 530, 1155 
reuse study, 232 
NPS, proposed transfer to, 219 
preservation guidelines, 205n451, 1154 
rehabilitation, 530, 1015, 1018, 1149 
relocation (proposed), 234, 862, 1148 
in Shore Station Development Plan (1940s), 155 
Spar Shop, 67 
as storage, 605 
Timber Shed, 55, 67 
usage (1921). 94 

76 [37] (Timber Shed) 

construction, repair, and improvements. 40, 40n117, 

130, 528-529, 1042. 1085 
demolition, 122, 529. 621. 623 
design, 528-529 
dram line work, 74 

location, 55, 91, 863, 1016-1017, 1045 
on master plan (1828), 40n117 
as storage, 605 
usage (1921), 94 

77 [36] (Mould Loft & Boat Shop / Married Officers Quar- 

ters Garages), 622 

appraisal photos, 1143 

Boat House, 90 

Boat Shop, 67, 586 

Building 62, conveyor bridge to, 526, 621-623, 1043 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1852), 40, 40n118, 67, 1086 

modifications (proposed, 1903), 526 

remodeling (1913), 1099 

dram line work (1914), 74 

framework replacement (1914-1915), 88 

railroad car access (1918), 88 

Garage addition by WPA, 1023 

WPA projects, 109, 114, 622, 624, 1023, 1106 

modifications (World War II), 130 

BRA demolition of addition (1970s), 114 

demolition, 67, 122, 621, 623, 1024. 1144 

landscaping, 1022 

location, 55, 1045 

on master plan (1828), 40n118, 622 

Mould Loft, 55, 67, 105, 507 

at Navy Yard closure, 192 

paint room, 1098 

railroad tracks, 1046 

redevelopment, 114, 232, 236, 622, 1144 

replacement, 624 

as storage, 605 

usage (1921), 94, 99 

World War II, 131 

78 (Officers Garage / Coal Shed/ Boat Storage), 99, 533, 

751, 820, 1042-1043, 1088 

79 (Storage / Boiler House / Wire Rope Mill), 531-534 
appraisal photos, 1141 

Boat Shop annex, 586 

Boiler House, 62 

Boundary Wall and, 28-29, 740, 742-743, 747-748, 

751 
Building 58, bridge to, 47, 520, 1141 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1853), 41. 1086-1087 

enlargement (1858), 41, 517. 535 

Wire Rope Mill, conversion to (1871), 45, 47, 62, 
518 

gas lighting installation (1874), 1089 

modifications (proposed, 1906), 526 

WPA projects, 534-535 

passage ramp (1969 plan), 820 

rehabilitation (1994), 1149 

rehabilitation (1999), 1151 

rehabilitation (2006), 534 
current status, 268 
dating, 531 nl 

demolition (proposed). 522 
HAER documentation, 534 
inadequacy of, 525 
Liquor Store, 444-445, 533 
National Register nomination photos, 388-390 
at Navy Yard closure, 188, 740 
ordnance storage. 559 
passageway, 820-821 
in Preble History Gallery, 62 
railroad tracks, 972 
railroad tracks (proposed). 975 
redevelopment. 205n451, 232. 537. 1148, 1150 
Ropewalk Coal House & Boiler House, 47 
as storage, 47 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

79 — Continued 
usage (1921), 94, 99 

80 (Kiln Furnace / Hoop Furnace). 28. 750, 1088 

81 (Shed / Woodshed). 1089, 1092 

82 (Shed / Woodshed), 1089 

83 (Shed / Woodshed). 1089, 1092 

84 (Guard House). 1091 

85 [M / N] (Mast House & Spar Shop) 
construction, repair, and improvements, 41. 1080 
fire, 67, 80. 529. 1096 

location in Navy Yard. 37. 55 

on master plan (1828). 33 

numbering of, 582 

removal, 583 

storage of finished products, 857 

storage of materials for, 863 

86 (Shed / Boatbuilders Steam Box). 1089, 1091-1092 

87 [51] (Wet Basin / Timber Dock) 
Boundary Wall and, 28, 742 

construction, repair, and improvements, 24. 857-858. 

863, 1045, 1081 
dory testing in, 857 
granite wall, 58 
infill of, 77 

location, 37, 52. 55, 555, 583, 1045 
on master plan (1828), 33 
redevelopment, 857, 863 
seawall, 866 
site, reuse of, 582, 860 

88 (Boiler Storage Shed), 1089, 1096 

89 (Boiler Storage Shed), 62, 1089 

90/91 [52] (Wet Basin / Timber Dock), 24, 995 

infill of, 1034 

location in Navy Yard, 37, 52, 56 

on master plan (1828), 994-995 

numbering of, 994-995 

shiphouse, 22-23 

streets & roadways. 1038 

in winter, 1094 
92 (Shiphouse), 56, 58, 67-68, 896, 1089, 1162 

94 (Boat House), 67-68. 896, 898, 1093 

95 (Electric Light Station), 562 

96 (Forklift Maintenance Shop / Power Station / Power 

House), 524, 535-537 (see also Building 52) 
appraisal photos, 1141 
Boundary Wall and, 742, 751 
Building 58. bridge to, 520 
Building 79, roof connection to, 533-534 
construction, repair, and improvements, 45, 47, 518, 

537, 1095, 1149 
current status, 268-269 
demolition (proposed), 522 
Forklift Repair Shop, 494 
HAER documentation, 208, 537 
at Navy Yard closure, 188 
Power House, 45, 47, 537 
railroad tracks, 972 

redevelopment, 205n451, 232, 1146, 1148, 1150 
renumbering of, 518 
as replacement for Building 52, 532 
usage (1921), 100 

97 (Main Gate), 661 
cake-top replica, 147 
civilian watchmen, 60 

construction, repair, and improvements, 70, 76, 417, 

443, 660, 1004, 1095-1097 
demolition, 158, 165, 444, 660, 1128 
funding, 811 
Guard House, 60, 65 
as iconic image of Navy Yard, 100, 660 
location (proximity to Quarters A), 45 
Marine sentries, 26, 60 
in Preble History Gallery, 60 
streets & roadways, 65 
traffic. 825. 1058 

100 (Laborers Shed / Shipkeepers & Foremen's Office), 

76, 1095, 1097 

101 (Storage / Timber Kiln / Millwrights Shop), 76, 78, 

100, 119. 1038, 1095 

102 (Oil Tank), 1095 

103 (Sheetmetal Shop / Chain & Anchor Storage / The 

Anchorage), 538-540 

appraisal photos, 1141 

as Chain & Anchor Storage, 70, 76 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1903), 23, 70, 76, 1040, 

1095-1097 
lean-to addition (1908). 842, 1098 
lean-to removal (1915), 842, 1102 
WPA projects, 109, 114, 539 
modifications, plan for (1938). 983 
rehabilitation (1985), 1146 

current status, 269 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

103 — Continued 

Electric Shop & Chain Storage 81 

fire, 1146 

gabled style, 850 

HAER documentation, 211, 540 

inactivation, 1138 

lean-to, 90, 844 

location, 930. 981, 1172 

in master plan, 155 

National Register nomination photos, 387-388 

at Navy Yard closure. 188 

power source, 77 

railroad tracks. 164, 972 

redevelopment (in New Development Area) 

in BRA reuse study 232 

conveyed to Building 103 Associates LP 1146 

damage by MDG Contractors. 1139 

preservation requirements, 205 

residential use. 242, 246, 540 
usage (1921). 94 

104 (Shipfitters Shop) 541-545 
appraisal photos. 1141 
archival materials, 1189 
beautification project, 104 

bridge cranes in Structural Shop, 1195 

Building 105, connection to (proposed), 541, 549 

construction, repair, and improvements 

steel-frame construction, 72 

original construction (1903), 70, 548. 554, 1095- 
1097 

addition (1917), 88 

WPA projects, 109, 112. 115. 543-544. 1042 

Electrical Substation addition (1936), 633-634. 
1106 

partial demolition (1940). 137. 1108 

Structural Shop addition (1940), 193, 512, 844, 
1053, 1106 

BRA demolition of Structural Shop addition 
(1982), 844, 1145 
current status. 269 
demolition, 134. 986 
design, 70, 850 
East Extension, 849, 937 

HAER documentation, 208, 211, 544-545, 1189 
inactivation, 1138 
on location map (1901), 538 
location relative to Building 103, 76, 538 
location relative to Dry Dock 5, 150, 808 
location relative to Pier 7 (ex-Pier 6). 930 
location relative to Pier 8, 77 
location relative to Shipways 2, 988 
location relative to steel storage area, 845 
Mold Loft, 507, 1214 

National Register nomination photos, 388 
at Navy Yard closure, 1 89 
power source, 77 
Radar Checkout Tower, 312, 623 
railroad tracks, 164, 934, 974 
redevelopment (in New Development Area) 

affordable housing, 242, 544 

BRA and 

conveyance to Bricklayers & Carpenters 
Charlestown Non-Profit Development 
Corp.. 1149 
developer, designation of, 1148 
reuse study. 232 

damage by MDG Contractors. 1139 

in national park proposal. 199 

in Parcel 31, 1149 

in Parcel 3K, 841 

in Parcel 4A, 842 

preservation guidelines, 205, 544 

reconveyed to Building 104 LP. 1149 

residential use. 246 
ship construction. 107n244, 1172 
in Shore Station Development Plan, 155 
site preparation work, 116 
Structural Shop, 842, 847 
usage (1921), 94 
usage (original), 548 
wooden patterns, 206 
104A (Structural Shop), 543, 843 

105 (Round House / Forge Shop / Smithery / Construc- 

tion & Repair Power Plant) 546-553 
appraisal photos, 1140 
archival materials, 1176, 1179, 1189 
Boiler Shop 511 
British landing site (Breed's Hill) 

plaque, 15, 362, 546, 1106, 1117 

proximity to, 446 
Building 104, connection to, 541 
Chain Forge, 510. 1099 
Chain Shop, 105, 506 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1 077-1 244 = Volume 3 



1262 



Index 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

1 05 — Continued 

as character-defining feature, 4, 372. 374 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1904), 71, 511, 542, 554, 

1042, 1096-1097 
extension authorization (1917), 1102 
roof ventilators and shed addition (1919). 88 
new roof (1931), 104 

conversion of Headhouse into Roundhouse 
(1930s), 104-105, 550, 974-975, 1040. 
1105 
WPA projects, 109, 115, 551 
expansion (World War II), 122, 131. 551, 1013, 

1112 
rehabilitation (1990s). 552 
current status, 269 
drop hammer, 153, 1183 
HAER documentation, 209-211, 551, 553 
hazardous materials remediation, 249-250, 1150- 

1151 
Headhouse, 81 
historic significance, 197 
Historic Structure Report (HSR), 8, 394 
location, 76, 538-539, 563, 981 
on location map (1901), 538 
machinery disposal, 205-206 
National Register nomination photos, 388 
at Navy Yard closure, 189, 191 
north extension, 606 

overhead crane tracks, 549, 555, 1042-1043 
overhead steam line, 170 
Power House & Shipsmiths Shop, 71 
power plant, 74n194, 77, 564 
railroad tracks. 972, 974, 976, 1040 
recommendations for, 6, 392 
redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 
in BNHP, 196, 552, 1145 
BRA and 

developer, designation of. 1146 
dispute with NPS over ownership of con- 
tents, 551-552, 551n1 
Memorandum of Agreement, 1139 
redevelopment proposal (2008), 1157 
rehabilitation, 552 
reuse study, 232 
transfer to. 551, 551 nl 
damage by MDG Contractors, 1139 
equipment preservation, 246, 551 
hazardous materials cleanup, 245, 552-553, 

1150-1151 
in national park proposal, 199 
NPS, proposed transfer to, 1139 
NPS, transfer to, 219 
NPS-BRA joint development, 380 
NPS-BRA Memorandum of Agreement, 1139 
preservation guidelines, 199, 205. 205n451, 245, 

381, 552-553, 573. 1154 
theme museum (proposed), 215, 383 
Roundhouse facility, 123, 505, 550-551 
Shipsmiths Shop, 77 
in Shore Station Development Plan, 155 
sidewalk, 1007 
usage (1921), 94 
ventilator structure, 165 
wheelabrator, 845 
World War II, 139 
105B (Smithery), 549 

106 (Die Sinker & Boiler Shop / Metalworkers Shop / 

The Basilica), 554-556 
appraisal photos, 1142 
archival materials, 1189 
construction, repair, and improvements 

steel-frame construction, 72 

original construction (1904), 71, 541-542, 548, 
1042, 1095-1097 

Steel Storage Shed addition (1943), 1109 

BRA demolition of Steel Storage Shed addition 
(1979), 556 

rehabilitation (1987), 1147 
current status, 269 
fiberglass boat construction, 586 
HAER documentation, 210, 555-556 
landscaping. 1015 
location relative to 16th St., 1046 
location relative to Building 66, 549 
location relative to Building 131, 863 
location relative to Dry Dock 5, 808 
location relative to HarborView at the Navy Yard, 848 
location relative to Second Ave , 1011 
in master plan, 155 
Metalworkers Shop, 71, 549 
at Navy Yard closure, 189 
overhead crane tracks. 555, 1042-1043 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

1 06 — Continued 
power house, 77 

redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 
The Basilica, 247, 556. 844, 848 
Boiler Shop, 511, 1099 
BRA and 

demolition of Steel Storage Shed addition, 

556 
developer, designation of, 1146 
lease transferred to Basilica Realty Corp.. 

1150 
lease transferred to Building 106 LP, 1149 
lease with Basilica Associates I, 1147 
reuse study. 232 
master deed, 556, 1147 
in national park proposal, 199 
preservation guidelines. 205n451. 556 
rehabilitation, 1147 
residential use, 246 
sidewalk, 1007 
streets & roadways, 844 
usage (1921). 94 
usage (original), 548 

107 (Public Works Shop), 557-561 
appraisal photos, 1142 
blueprint processing system, 77 

Building 108, link to, 245n634, 557, 560-561, 563, 

572 
chain storage, 100 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1904), 71, 1036, 1095- 

1097 
lengthening (1904), 562, 1097 
improvements (1907), 1098 
WPA projects, 109, 118, 559-560, 1106 
remodeling (1936), 1106 
additions (World War II), 130 
BRA demolition of additions (1970s), 130, 560 
rehabilitation for BNHP Maintenance Division 

offices (1987), 1147 
rehabilitation for BNHP Cultural Resources Divi- 
sion (1989), 1148 
roof replacement (1992-1994), 230, 561 
current status, 269 
design, 77, 563 
HAER documentation, 561 
location, 100, 115, 562 
National Register nomination photos, 388 
at Navy Yard closure, 189 
Navy Yard Employees Band, 480 
ordnance storage, 533 
plan (1922), 565 
Power Plant (Shop 03), 571 
redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 
BNHP and 

Archives, 1175-1181 

Cultural Resources Division, 561, 1148, 

1181-1182 
inclusion in BNHP, 196 
Maintenance Division offices, 246, 560, 579, 

1145, 1147 
Museum Collection, 225, 1182 
staff offices, 224, 453 
BRA and 

conveyance to NPS, 219, 219n510, 237, 

560, 819. 1146 
demolition of additions. 130, 560 
renovations, 561 

title transfer, 219, 219n510, 563.628, 1144, 
1146 
in national park proposal, 199 
preservation guidelines, 205n451 
signage, 375, 1184 
storage use, 605 
usage (1921), 94 

108 (Central Power Plant), 562-573 
appraisal photos, 1142-1143 
archival materials, 1189 
auxiliary power source, 90, 609 

Building 107, link to, 245n634, 557, 560-561. 563. 

572 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1904), 71, 74, 78, 459, 536. 

549, 557, 1095-1097 
enlargement (1900s). 77, 1096. 1098 
improvements (1910s), 85, 88, 1098, 1102, 1104 
alterations (1921-1923). 104 
WPA additions, 109, 115, 565 
expansion (1940s), 122. 130-131, 519, 1107 
improvements (1950s), 155, 1124 
Power Plant upgrade (1953-1954). 165. 672 
BRA demolition of additions (1979). 130. 244, 
560, 572 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

1 08 — Continued 
current status, 270 
deterioration, 573 

discontinuance. 445. 476, 571, 1139 
fuel system, 629-630 

HAER documentation, 571, 573, 1189 
hazardous materials remediation, 249, 572-573, 1150 
location, 81 

National Register nomination photos, 389 
at Navy Yard closure, 188-189 
railroad tracks, 1018-1019 
redevelopment (In Historic Monument Area) 
Anchor Building (proposed). 244-245, 572 
BRA and 

demolition of additions, 130, 244, 560, 572 
developer, designation of, 1146 
preservation guidelines. 205n451, 244-245. 

381-382. 571-573 
reuse study, 232 
transfer to, 571 
Building 107. connector to. 245n634 
current status, 380, 573 
on site plans, 559 
steam line, 170, 478, 606 
streets & roadways. 1023. 1142 
Underground Pipe Conduit, 670 
usage (1921), 94 

109 (Coaling Plant / Waterfront Office), 574-579 
alignment with Pier 1. 686 

Coal Storage & Handling Plant, 71, 78, 90, 100, 565 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1904). 71, 898-899, 1095- 

1097 
coaling tower construction (1916), 1102 
WPA projects, 109, 115, 189, 574, 577, 900-901, 

1106 
expansion (World War II), 122, 131. 1108, 1113 
gas-fired boilers, installation of (1974), 203 

current status, 266, 270 

demolition, 78, 105, 900, 1105 

Electrical Substation, 1106 

historic significance, 219 

location, 70, 78, 452, 659, 900. 902 

at Navy Yard closure, 189 

Pier 1 reconstruction and, 68 

railroad tracks, 975, 977 

redevelopment, 221, 224, 276, 455, 1155 

street signs, 1030 

Underground Steam Line, 673 

usage (1921), 94 

washrooms for, 451 

Waterfront Office, 901 
109A (see Building 162) 
109B (see Building 162) 

110 (Lead Room / Pitch House / Blacksmith Shop), 580- 

581 
construction, repair, and improvements, 78, 1096 
current status, 71, 270 
HAER documentation, 210 
inactivation, 1137 
location, 646 
at Navy Yard closure. 189 
Pitch House. 71, 78, 899 
recommendations for, 6, 391 
relocation, 78, 86, 599, 831, 1102 
World War I, 83 

111 (Temporary Building for Locomotive), 842-843, 974, 

1096, 1099 

112 (Iron & Steel Storage), 1095 

113 (Storehouse / Millwrights Shop), 78 

114 (Woodworking Shop / Saw Mill & Spar Shed / Boat 

Shop ' Boatworks Building), 582-589 
appraisal photos, 1143 
bandsaw, 275, 587-589 
Boat Shop, 638 

Boundary Wall and, 28-29, 742, 749 
as Building 85 replacement, 80 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1904), 71. 78. 529, 1096- 
1098 

drain line work (1914), 74 

WPA projects, 109, 115, 585 

renovation (1980s), 236 

BRA demolition of west wing (1994), 588, 822, 
1046, 1149 
current status, 270, 275 

damage from Building 165 explosion, 116. 1106 
demolition, 222 
equipment, 210. 465 
HAER documentation, 210. 589 
location, 859, 865, 1045-1046 
machinery, 206 
on master plan (1828), 582 



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Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



1263 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Charleslown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

114 — Continued 

at Navy Yard closure. 189, 193 
outside storage, 865 
railroad tracks, 1046 

redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 
boat docking facility, 238, 588-589, 1156 
Boatworks Building opening. 588, 1151 
BRA and 

demolition of west wing, 588, 822, 1046, 

1149 
developer, designation of, 587 
lease to Joinery Shop Associates. 587, 1147 
lease transferred to Massachusetts Biomedi- 
cal Research Corp., 243. 1151 
exhibits, 258. 258n725, 383 
Joinery Shop Associates, 1147, 1156 
pile walkway, 589, 1155-1156 
preservation guidelines, 205n451. 587-588, 1154 
removal of woodworking machinery, 210, 465 
renovation. 236 
streets & roadways, 1020 
Saw Mill, 71, 74, 78, 1218 
in Shore Station Development Plan, 155 
streets & roadways, 222 
usage (1921), 94 
Woodworking Shop, 1099 

115 (Tool House/ Testing Laboratory for Electric Cable / 

Planning Office), 930 

116 (Gate House, Lower Gate) (see Building 243) 

117 (Officers Garage / Stable) 

construction, repair, and improvements, 71, 562-563, 

1097 
demolition, 131, 562, 566, 1107 
design, 101 
location, 1023 

Stable & Carriage House, 71, 78 
usage (1921), 100 

118 (Water Closets) 

construction, repair, and improvements, 101, 596, 846, 

1096-1097 
demolition, 85, 101, 511-512, 596, 1102 
location, 101, 596 

119 (Latrine) 

construction, repair, and improvements, 101, 596, 846, 

1096 
demolition, 85, 101, 511-512, 596, 1102 
location, 101, 596 

1 20 (Medical Building / Dispensary / Dental Department), 

590-593 
appraisal photos. 1140. 1142 
authorization, 1096 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1905), 71, 1097-1098 
additions (1910s), 89, 101, 1099, 1104 
additions (World War II), 130 
Dental Clinic addition (1950s), 155, 165, 1124 
BRA demolition of Dental Clinic addition (1978), 

130, 240, 593, 1142, 1144 
rehabilitation (1980s), 241. 593, 1147 
current status, 270 
Dental Clinic addition, 1142 
Dental Department, 165, 592-593, 1124 
Dispensary, 71, 78, 101, 155 
"Flirtation Walk," 519 
HAER documentation, 207 
location, 78 

National Register nomination photos, 386, 389 
at Navy Yard closure, 190 
North Extension, 592-593 
radio tower, 452 

redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 
BRA and 

Dental Clinic demolition, 130, 240, 593, 

1142, 1144 
lease to John Paul Jones LP, 593, 1146 
lease transferred to JRC Ventures, 593, 1 1 50 
lease transferred to Navy Yard Dispensary 

Building LLC, 593, 1150 
lease transferred to Second Mass Ave Re- 
alty Trust. 593. 1155 
reuse study, 232 
John Paul Jones House. 593, 1147 
in national park proposal, 199 
preservation guidelines, 205n451 
rehabilitation. 241, 593, 1147 
tenants, 593 
replacement plans, 480 
in Shore Station Development Plan, 155 
signage, 600 
Wing A, 591-593 
Wing B, 591-593 
122 (Marine Corps Rifle Range), 79, 90. 472, 842, 1096, 
1098 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

Numbered Buildings & Structures — Continued 

123 (Pump House) 594-595 
appraisal photos, 1142 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1905), 71, 79, 459, 598, 

1098 
upgrades (1961), 166 
pump replacement (1962), 784, 1128 
current status, 79, 270, 274 
dewatering system, 764-765, 769, 782, 1097, 1180 
Dry Dock 2 construction and, 69 
HAER documentation, 210 
location in Navy Yard, 94 
National Register nomination photos, 389 
at Navy Yard closure, 190 
recommendations for, 5-6, 37, 382-383. 392 
redevelopment (in Shipyard Park) 
art exhibit, 998 
BRA and, 205, 232, 594, 785 
interpretive waysides, recommendations for, 5. 

382-383 
preservation guidelines, 205 
in Shipyard Park design, 997 

124 (Public Toilet / Latrine), 596-597 
construction, repair, and improvements, 101, 846, 

1096-1097 
current status, 71, 101, 270, 511 
design, 467, 511, 846 
HAER documentation, 210 
light tower, 644 
location, 97, 101, 464, 1048 
portal crane rails, 1055 
recommendations for, 6, 391 

125 (PaintShop), 598-601 
compressed air line, 382 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1906). 71, 79, 451, 1097- 

1098 
north wing addition (1917), 79, 89, 1102 
expansion (proposed, 1950s), 581 
window installation (1950s), 378 
modifications (1966), 166 
NPS rehabilitation (1970s), 203, 378 
roof replacement (1992-1994), 230 
rehabilitation projects (2000s), 230-231, 1155 

current status, 270 

dry dock culvert, 765, 1180 

HAER documentation, 210 

inactivation, 1138 

Light Tower, 647 

location, 78, 152, 646, 909. 916, 1048 

Lowell's Boat Shop, 1157 

Marine Railway construction and, 831 

National Register nomination photos. 386 

at Navy Yard closure, 183, 190 

Pier 1 reconstruction, 68 

portable shed, 687 

redevelopment (in BNHP) 

exhibits, 215, 221, 255, 449, 1048, 1149 

Massachusetts Environmental Police offices, 225 

in national park proposal, 199 

New England Historic Seaport, 260, 262 

Northeast Museum Services Center, 226, 1148 

NPS offices, 224 

rehabilitation projects, 203, 230-231, 378, 1155 

Underground Pipe Conduit, 670 

usage (1921), 94 

World War I, 83 

126 (Latrine) 
authorization, 1097 

construction, repair, and improvements, 81. 101. 596. 

846 
design, 511, 596-597, 846 
location, 101, 539, 1052 

127 (Latrine), 846 

construction, repair, and improvements, 79, 101, 596 

842, 1097 
demolition, 1144 
demolition (proposed), 543 
design, 511, 596-597, 842 
HAER documentation, 846 
inactivation, 1137 
location between Piers 8 and 9. 101, 161, 852, 937, 

1172 
location relative to Building 71, 846 
location relative to Dock St., 1054 
location relative to steel storage area, 845 
at Navy Yard closure, 184, 190 
paint storage in, 846 

128 (Watchman's House/Scale House). 101.842, 1043, 

1172 

129 (Dump Office / Wireless Telegraph Station / Visitors 

Water Closets), 451-452. 863, 990, 1097-1098 

130 (Storehouse), 62, 842, 844, 1045, 1098 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

Numbered Buildings & Structures — Continued 

131 (Oil Storehouse / Paint & Oil Storehouse) 
appraisal photos, 1142-1143 
construction, repair, and improvements 

reinforced concrete construction. 79 

original construction (1910-1911), 71, 857-858, 

1098-1099 
addition (1914), 89, 858. 1099 
extension (1918). 89. 858, 1102 
WPA projects. 109. 116, 860-861, 1106-1107, 

1142 
demolition (1938), 861-862, 868. 1106, 1151 
reconstruction (1939). 132. 861, 1107 
extension (World War II), 122. 131, 861. 1112 
BRA demolition (1990s), 861-862 

HAER documentation, 210 

location on site of former Timber Dock. 79. 857, 863 

location relative to 16th St.. 1046 

location relative to Building 203, 866 

location relative to Dry Dock 5, 808 

location relative to Fuel Oil Tank, 859-860 

location relative to Pier 11 (ex-Pier 10B). 249, 943 

at Navy Yard closure, 190 

with nearby buildings, 101 

redevelopment, 219, 232, 753, 857, 860-862, 868 

settlement problems, 860 

in Shore Station Development Plan. 155 

storage use, 605, 753 

usage (1921), 94 

132 (Wire Rope Mill). 48n144, 80n198 

134 (Electrical Substation / Power Plant) 
construction, repair, and improvements, 101, 1098 
Electric Substation, conversion into, 101 
location, 857, 859, 1045 

as Wabash. USS, Power Station, 55. 91, 101 

135 (Storage / Refuse Kiln / Crematory) 
construction, repair, and improvements, 79, 857, 866, 

1098 
location, 858-860 
redevelopment, 857 
Refuse Kiln, 79, 91 
removal, 861 

136 (Marine Corps Administration Building), 1033 
closure, 453 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1909), 18-19n38, 71, 1033, 

1098 
WPA projects, 18, 109, 116, 1033, 1057. 1106 
new porches and stair towers (1941), 130, 1057 
gas-fired boilers, installation of (1974), 203 
design, 101, 1033 
location, 818, 828 

National Register nomination photos, 389-390 
at Navy Yard closure, 190 
redevelopment (in BNHP) 

BRA demolition, 130, 1014, 1033, 1057, 1144 
impact on BNHP offices, 224, 579 
mitigation measures, 219, 819 
purpose of, 1032 
relocation (proposed), 218 
safety signs, 600, 817 
sidewalk. 1057 

transfer from Navy to Marine Corps (1964). 19, 827, 
1131 

139 (Pump House), 90, 842, 844, 1099, 1108 

140 (Stone Crusher). 89, 604, 1099 

141 (Pump House) 

construction, repair, and improvements, 90, 109, 116. 

842, 1099 
demolition, 134, 138, 1108 
location. 842. 844 
pipeline, 859 
purpose, 842 
relocation, 116, 1107 

142 (Storehouse) (see also South Boston Annex - Fa- 

cilities - Numbered Buildings & Structures - 142) 
construction, repair, and improvements, 539, 842, 

1102 
corrugated iron siding, 90 
location, 90, 844 

relocation to South Boston Annex, 844 
size, 842 
steel framing, 90 
as storage, 605 
usage (1921), 94 
usage (original), 842 

143 (Chapel / Lavatory). 1021 
Chapel, 90, 1019 
dedication ceremony, 166, 1116 
demolition. 1144 

design, 101 
funerals. 169, 1021 
HAER documentation. 1021 
inactivation, 1138 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



1264 



Index 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

143 — Continued 
location, 90. 1023 

National Register nomination photos, 387 
at Navy Yard closure, 190 
redevelopment, 232, 236, 1021, 1144 
retirement services, 1130 
stone construction, 90 
Washroom & Water Closet, 90 
weddings, 1021 

144 (Locomotive & Crane Shed), 102, 863-864, 974, 1102 

146 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 860-861 

147 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 90, 860-861, 900 

148 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 90, 116, 843-844, 864, 

1019 

149 (Supply Dept. Storage / General Storehouse / Mas- 

sachusetts General Hospital-East), 85, 602-607 
appraisal photos, 1143 

Building 199, bridges to, 122. 621, 624, 1043-1044 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1918), 364,483,498, 1019, 
1042, 1102 
buildings demolished for, 89, 529, 1019, 

1102 
discontinuance of Third Ave. for, 1018 
extension of railroad tracks, 1040 
addition (1919), 364, 1104 
improvements (1921), 102 
WPA projects. 605 
waterproofing (1948), 166 
rehabilitation, 236, 241, 1044, 1147 
current status, 271 
design, 292, 712, 718 
General Storehouse, 94 
General Storekeeper, 498 
HAER documentation, 210 
location, 94, 1041 
Mail Room, 534, 620 
National Register nomination photos, 390 
at Navy Yard closure, 191 
Navy Yard Sesquicentennial, 148 
overhead steam line, 170 
railroad tracks, 1019 

redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 
BRA and 

developer, designation of, 1145 

lease to Constitution Office Park Associates, 

1146 
lease transferred to Massachusetts Biomedi- 
cal Research Corp., 1150 
lease transferred to Massachusetts Indus- 
trial Finance Agency, 1148 
lease transferred to Navy Yard-Biotechnical 

Research Associates, 1147 
railroad track removal, 1020 
food services, 259 

Massachusetts College of Art proposal, 236 
Massachusetts General Hospital sublease, 1147 
MGH Biomedical Research Center, 243 
in national park proposal, 199 
preservation guidelines, 205n451, 606, 1020 
rehabilitation, 236, 241, 1044, 1147 
tenants, 624, 1139 
in Shore Station Development Plan, 155 
size, 191 

as Timber Shed replacement, 972 
usage (1921), 94 
World War II, 139 

150 (Electrical Substation / Garage / Constitution Inn), 

608-611 
appraisal photos, 1143 
Building 39, bridge to, 164. 499 
construction, repair, and improvements. 90. 1 30, 1 66, 

1102 
current status, 271 
Electrical Substation, 90, 565 
Garage, 90 

HAER documentation, 610 
location, 495 

at Navy Yard closure, 187, 189 
redevelopment (see Parcels - 150) 
removal, 494 

151 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 900 

152 (Temporary Coal Storage Bin), 91 

153 (Ordnance Storehouse / Battery Charging Station) 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1917), 805, 1102 
Ordnance Storehouse, conversion to (1936), 716, 

805 
WPA projects, 109, 112. 1106 

demolition, 134, 138, 1108 

location, 805, 852, 860 

ordnance storage. 559 

railroad tracks, 1046 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

153 — Continued 
usage (1921), 94 
usage (original). 716, 805 

154 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 91. 116, 864, 1106 

155 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 91, 116, 864, 1106 

156 (Portable Steel Storehouse). 91. 116. 864. 1106 

157 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 116, 864, 1106 
159 (Hawser Storage / Storehouse for Coal), 900 

161 (Shop Offices), 91 

162 (Coal Storehouse) (aka Buildings 109A, 109B), 900 

163 (Band Stand). 169, 648, 656-657, 990, 993, 1102 

164 (Storehouse & Clearing House / Men's Comfort Sta- 

tion), 119, 512, 996-997 

165 (Acetylene Plant / Storage) 

construction, repair, and improvements, 109. 116, 191. 

860-862, 1104, 1106 
demolition, 861-862. 1151 
design, 860 
explosion (1934), 115-116, 585, 860, 1106, 1187- 

1188 
HAER documentation, 868 
hazardous materials, 91 
location, 91, 860-861, 864, 945 
at Navy Yard closure, 191-192 
oxygen, hydrogen, and acetylene tanks, 860 
redevelopment, 232, 857, 861-862 
World War II, 132 
165A (Acetylene Plant), 191-192, 232, 857, 860-862, 
868, 1151 

166 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 1053 

167 (Portable Steel Air House / Portable Steel Store- 

house), 108, 926 

177 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 101, 860-861, 864 

1 78 (Storage / Portable Steel Storehouse) 
demolition, 868, 1151 
inactivation, 1138 

location, 91, 864-865, 868, 1046 
at Navy Yard closure, 191 
outside storage, 865 
redevelopment, 232, 863, 868 
relocation, 864 

179 (Portable Steel Storehouse). 91 

180 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 91 

181 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 91 

182 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 91 

183 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 91 

184 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 91 

185 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 91 

186 (Portable Steel Storehouse), 843-844 

187 (Storage / Steel Storehouse), 1017 
appraisal photos, 1141 

construction, repair, and improvements, 91,131, 529, 

1017-1018, 1104 
demolition. 1017. 1144 
HAER documentation, 208, 1017 
location, 529, 623, 1016, 1046 
at Navy Yard closure, 188, 192 
railroad tracks, 1017 

redevelopment, 232, 236, 1017-1018, 1144 
in Shore Station Development Plan, 155 
as storage, 605 
usage (1921), 94 
World War II, 130 

188 (Storehouse), 860 

1 89 (Air House / Platefield Office / Transportation Office 

/ Lockers), 505, 625. 843 

190 (Ingram Club / YMCA), 608. 994. 996-997 

191 (Salt Water Pump House) 

construction, repair, and improvements, 104-105, 

109, 116, 1105 
demolition, 1144 
HAER documentation, 212 
location, 105, 1054 
at Navy Yard closure, 191 
during pier reconstruction, 161 
redevelopment, 232, 236, 1144 
191A (Salt Water Intake Screen House), 161, 191, 232, 
236, 1144 

192 (Electrical Substation) 
appraisal photos, 1141 

construction, repair, and improvements, 105, 1105 
demolition, 1144 
HAER documentation, 211-212 
at Navy Yard closure, 191 
redevelopment, 232, 236, 1144 
in Shore Station Development Plan, 155 
192 A (Substation Extension) 
appraisal photos. 1141 
construction, repair, and improvements, 167 
demolition, 1144 
HAER documentation, 211-212 
at Navy Yard closure, 191 
redevelopment, 236. 1144 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

Numbered Buildings & Structures — Continued 

193 (Storage / Salvage Stores Building) 
construction, repair, and improvements, 109, 116, 843, 

864-865, 1106 
demolition, 868, 1151 
location, 868. 1046 
at Navy Yard closure, 191 
redevelopment, 232, 863, 868 

194 (Navy Exchange Service Station), 902 
construction, repair, and improvements, 109, 117, 

900-902, 1106 
demolition, 191, 202. 902. 996, 1138 
design, 900 
Gasoline Station, 1204 
hazardous materials remediation, 249 
at Navy Yard closure, 191 
streets & roadways, 1029 
Underground Steam Line, 673 

195 (Industrial Building / Pipe Shop and Assembly & 

Welding Shop / Shipyard Park), 119, 612-613 
appraisal photos, 1143 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction by WPA (1938), 109, 114, 
119. 512, 612, 995-996, 1107 
building demolition for, 119, 996 
impact on streets & roadways, 1053 

extensions built by WPA (1938-1939), 109, 119, 
612. 997 

additions (World War II), 130, 489, 1108, 1112 
current status, 271 
demolition, 996, 998 
Furnace Shed, 615-616 
HAER documentation, 613, 997 
Locker Room, 612-613 
at Navy Yard closure, 191 
Navy Yard Sesquicentennial, 148 
redevelopment (in Shipyard Park) 

BRA and, 232, 612-613. 996-997 

demolition, 238-239 

demolition (proposed), 997-999, 1221 

reuse for recreational purposes, 785 

in Shipyard Park, 994. 994n1 

transfer to National Park Service, 205 

visitor attraction plans, 259 
rooftop floodlights (proposed). 644-647. 784 
Safety Shoe sign, 491, 655 
shipbuilding, 137, 142, 154, 586, 986, 1172 
South Extension, 612, 997 
streets & roadways, 1035 
West Extension. 612, 997 

196 (Ship Machinery Test Plant) 
appraisal photos, 1140 

construction, repair, and improvements, 109, 117, 165 

demolition, 240, 1144 

foundation, 617 

HAER documentation, 212 

location, 928-929 

at Navy Yard closure, 191 

redevelopment, 232, 240, 617, 997 

World War II, 130 

197 (Industrial Building / Light Shop / Electronics & Elec- 

trical Shop / Flagship Wharf), 614-617 
appraisal photos, 1142-1143 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1942), 122. 132, 995-997, 

1107-1108 
expansion (1950s), 158, 167, 179, 1124 
rehabilitation, 242. 271, 380, 617 
current status, 271 
Electrical Shop, 539 
HAER documentation, 212, 616 
location, 924, 1054 

National Register nomination photos, 386, 389 
at Navy Yard closure, 191-192 
Navy Yard Sesquicentennial. 148 
redevelopment (in New Development Area) 
Boston HarborWalk, 1054 
BRA and 

conveyance to Flagship Wharf Realty Trust. 

617. 1147 
inclusion/deletion from Shipyard Park, 616, 

994 
retention in New Development Area, 213, 

997 
reuse study, 232 
Chapter 91 license, 617 
demolition (proposed), 997 
Flagship Wharf 

condominiums, 247, 617, 1025. 1148 
food services, 259 
master deed, 61 7 
project agreements. 849 
rehabilitation, 242. 271. 380. 617 
residents. 925 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1 244 = Volume 3 



1265 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 
197 

redevelopment 

Flagship Wharf — Continued 

retail operations, 244 
Independence Quarters (later Flagship Wharf), 

242, 616 
in Kennedy Library proposal, 259 
MBTA Ferry Passenger Shelters, 838 
New England Historic Seaport offices, 225, 262 
preservation guidelines, 205. 213 
residential use, 246 
streets & roadways, 1025, 1039 
World War II, 130, 142, 1112 

198 (Supply Dept Storage /Temporary Storehouse), 618- 

620 
barracks proposal (1959), 480 
Constitution, USS, storage space, 1138 
construction, repair, and improvements, 120, 122, 132, 

641, 1107, 1113 
demolition, 219, 219n512, 819, 1008, 1014, 1032- 

1033, 1144 
demolition (proposed), 155, 218 
foundation wall, 219n512 
inactivation, 1138 
location, 120, 152, 645, 818, 1033 
National Register nomination photos, 389 
at Navy Yard closure, 186 
railroad tracks, 975 
recommendations for, 6 
rooftop lights, 644-647, 784 
in Shore Station Development Plan, 155 
WAVES barracks, 122 

199 (Supply Dept. Storage / General Storehouse / Navy 

Yard Parking Facility), 621-624 
appraisal photos, 1141, 1143 
Building 62, bridges to. 526, 624, 1044, 1141, 1143 
Building 149, bridges to, 122, 605, 621, 624, 1043- 

1044 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1941), 122, 132, 526, 605, 
621, 1020, 1043, 1108 
building demolition for, 67, 122, 130, 529, 

621, 1023 
impact on streets, 1020, 1053 
extension (World War II), 131. 1112 
rehabilitation, 624, 1044, 1147 
current status, 271 
design, 132, 292, 718 
East Extension, 621, 623-624 
HAER documentation, 208, 624 
location, 150, 605. 1020, 1046 
National Register nomination photos, 389-390 
at Navy Yard closure, 188, 192 
Navy Yard Sesquicentennial, 148 
railroad tracks, 1020 

redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 
BRA and 

demolition of bridges, 1044, 1141 
developer, designation of, 623, 1145 
lease to Navy Yard Parking Associates/ 

LNRC Venture, 624, 1146 
lease transferred to Massachusetts Biomedi- 
cal Research Corp., 1150 
lease transferred to Massachusetts Indus- 
trial Finance Agency, 1148 
transfer to, 623 
design guideline amendments, 1154 
MGH Institute of Health Professions, 243 
as parking garage, 223, 606, 623-624, 1024 
rehabilitation, 624, 1044, 1147 
shuttle buses, 223 
streets & roadways. 1018 
as replacement for Building 77, 526 
in Shore Station Development Plan, 155 
size, 192 

200 (Public Works Administration Building), 486-487 
appraisal photos, 1143 

Building 34, emergency egress bridges to, 483 
construction, repair, and improvements, 1 22, 1 30. 1 32, 

483, 1108 
current status, 271 
demolition, 1144 
design, 292, 708 
Fire Department, 486-487 
Fire Station, 1035 
HAER documentation, 487 
location, 483 

National Register nomination photos, 387 
at Navy Yard closure, 187 
Public Works Office. 486 
redevelopment (see Parcels - 200) 
in Shore Station Development Plan. 155 

201 (Storehouse), 132, 155, 162, 861 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

Numbered Buildings & Structures — Continued 

202 (Electronics Training / Labor Board Office /Antisub- 

marine Warfare Instructors School), 133, 158, 
1058-1059, 1124 

203 (Sandblasting Facility / Incinerator) 
appraisal photos, 1143 

archival materials, 1189 

chimneys, 944 

construction, repair, and improvements, 122, 132. 566. 

865-866, 1112 
demolition, 868, 1149 
design, 865-866 
discontinuance, 866-867 
HAER documentation. 866, 868, 1189 
hazardous materials remediation, 249 
location, 865-866 
at Navy Yard closure, 192 
ramp leading to upper level, 940 
redevelopment, 232, 863 
in Shore Station Development Plan, 155 
stacks, 162 

204 (Garage), 625-628 
access. 1124 

Boundary Wall and, 220, 741, 745-746 

construction, repair, and improvements, 167 

demolition, 24, 219, 221, 441, 819, 1145 

demolition (proposed). 215, 217-218 

location, 814 

Navy acquisition of, 26, 122, 133, 1109 

at Navy Yard closure, 185, 192 

replacement, 628 

signage, 826 

streets & roadways, 224, 1124 

wall "ruin," 628 

205 (Salvage Stores / Deperming Station), 132, 218, 805, 

939, 1116 

206 (Administration Building / Locker Building) 
appraisal photos, 1143 

construction, repair, and improvements, 122, 132,861, 

1112 
demolition, 861-862, 1149 
design, 861 
fire, 1148 

HAER documentation, 868 
hazardous materials remediation, 249 
inactivation, 1138 
location, 162, 808, 861-862, 866 
at Navy Yard closure, 192 
redevelopment, 232, 857 
in Shore Station Development Plan, 155 
streets & roadways, 861 

207 (Motion Picture Exchange / Decontamination Build 

ing) 
appraisal photos, 1141 
construction, repair, and improvements, 536 
demolition, 1144 
HAER documentation, 208, 537 
at Navy Yard closure, 192 
redevelopment, 232, 236, 1144 

208 (Repair Superintendent / First Aid Building), 1 61 , 91 5. 

1128 

209 (First Aid Building), 1116 

210 (Storage), 155, 189, 232, 587, 865, 1138 
211A(lndustnal Service Building, Pier 5). 922-923, 1108. 

1116 
211 B (Industrial Service Building, Pier 5), 133, 192, 232, 

922-924, 1108, 1128 
211C (Industrial Service Building, Pier 5), 133, 922-923, 

1108, 1116 
21 2A (Industrial Service Building, Pier 6), 927-928 
21 2B (Industrial Service Building, Pier 6), 927-928 
21 2C (Industrial Service Building, Pier 6), 139, 927-928 
213A (Industrial Service Building, Pier 7), 931 
21 3B (Industrial Service Building, Pier 7), 931 
21 3C (Industrial Service Building, Pier 7), 931 
21 4A (Industrial Service Building, Pier 8), 935-936 
21 4B (Industrial Service Building, Pier 8), 935-936 
21 5A (Office of Submarine Construction). 133 
21 5B (Industrial Service Building. Pier 10), 146, 853- 

854, 1116 
21 5C (Industrial Service Building, Pier 10). 146, 232. 853- 

854 

217 (Lumber Storage). 193, 232, 236, 1144 

218 (Lumber Storage), 168, 865, 1128 

218A (Lumber Storage), 189, 232, 585, 587, 865 

219 (Ship Superintendent's Office Annex / Paint Shop 

Storage), 161, 168. 915, 916, 1128 

220 (Underground Fuel Oil Tank / Underground Water 

Storage Tank) 629-630 
construction, repair, and improvements, 568, 1109 
conversion from Water Tank to Fuel Oil Tank, 568 
current status, 265 
fuel oil line to Pier 1, 672 
hazardous materials remediation, 249, 758, 1149 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

220 — Continued 
installation, 122 
lawn over, 758 
pumps, 1051 

221 (Underground Water Storage Tank). 122, 631. 670. 

828, 1109 

222 (Underground Water Storage Tank), 536 

223 (Underground Water Storage Tank), 265, 632, 643. 

1109 

224 (Substation), 633-634 

construction, repair, and improvements, 115 633. 

1106 
current status. 272, 543 
HAER documentation, 211, 634 
at Navy Yard closure, 184, 193 
redevelopment. 232. 634. 1044 
relocation and designation of Building 104 addition 

as, 115. 543, 986, 1106 
relocation by BRA, 634, 1044 

225 (Fire Pump House, Pier 11). 193. 232. 941. 944- 

945, 1138 

226 (Industrial Service Building, Pier 11), 193, 232. 941- 

942, 944-945 

227 (Fire Pump House, Pier 6), 168, 193,212,232,928- 

929, 1138 

228 (Industrial Service Building, Pier 6 / Tavern on the 

Water), 635 
construction, repair, and improvements, 168. 928-929 
current status. 274 
design, 150, 928-929 
inactivation, 1137 
at Navy Yard closure. 193 
redevelopment. 205. 232. 259, 635. 839, 929 

229 (Fire Pump House, Pier 4), 168. 193. 232, 919 

230 (Industrial Service Building, Pier 4 / Courageous 

Sailing Center), 636 
current status, 274 
design, 918 
inactivation, 1137 
location on Pier 4, 919 
at Navy Yard closure, 193 
redevelopment, 232, 260-261, 636 

231 (Switching Station), 232 

232 (Fire Pump House. Pier 7). 193. 232. 932, 1138 

233 (Industrial Service Building. Pier 7), 193. 232, 932- 

933. 1137 

234 (Track Scale). 454, 637-638, 639, 977, 1105, 1137 

235 (Truck Scale), 639-640 

construction, repair, and improvements, 168 228 

230-231, 455, 1009. 1146 
inactivation, 1137 
installation, 1124 
at Navy Yard closure, 186 
numbering of. 168 
redevelopment. 228. 230-231 
scale house, 454 

236 (Tennis Court), 641-642 

construction, repair, and improvements, 155, 168, 230. 

656, 992, 1115 
current status, 272 
location, 992 
numbering of, 168 
partial removal for widening of Second Ave ,1013 

237 (Tennis Court), 643 

"Apple Orchard" birthday party, 437, 439 

current status, 265 

location, 641 

at Navy Yard closure, 185 

redevelopment, 643 

underground tanks, 629, 631-632 

238 (Light Tower. Dry Dock 2), 210, 266. 597, 644-645, 

784, 1124 

239 (Light Tower, Dry Dock 2), 166, 210, 266, 646, 784, 

1124 

240 (Light Tower, Dry Dock 2), 647 
erection of, 166. 784, 1124 
HAER documentation, 210 
location, 646 

at Navy Yard closure, 190 

241 (Radar Tower), 312. 623. 847. 937 

242 (Flag Pole) 169, 648-649 
current status, 272 
location, 38, 656. 990 

Navy Yard disestablishment ceremony, 182, 194 
rehabilitation 1116 
Reviewing Stand, 992-993 
Structure 260 (Band Stand) and, 656 

243 (Gate House) (ex-Building 116), 28, 820-821 1043. 

1128 

244 (Gate House), 397, 818, 1131 

245 (Ground Equipment Shop / Garage), 21 8. 272 650- 

651, 757-759, 1145 

246 (Light Tower, Pier 4), 274. 652, 919 



Pages 1 -394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



1 266 



Index 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

Numbered Buildings & Structures — Continued 

247 (Light Tower, Pier 6). 275. 653, 928-929 

248 (Light Tower, Building 229), 919 

249 (Light Tower), 928-929 

250 (Light Tower, Pier 11), 192, 249, 941, 944-945 

251 (Light Tower, Pier 11), 249. 941, 944-945 

252 (Light Tower, Pier 11), 191. 249, 941, 944-945 

253 (Light Tower, Building 232), 514, 932 

254 (Light Tower, Pier 7), 932-933 

255 (Light Tower, Pier 7), 184, 932 

257 (Gate House), 821, 1128 

258 (Police Shelter Building / Truck Check Station), 1 69, 

1059 

259 (Grit Hopper), 654 
Aboveground Steam Line, 674 

as character-defining feature, 373. 375 

construction, repair, and improvements, 170, 230, 903 

current status. 272 

location. 666 

at Navy Yard closure, 193 

recommendations for, 6, 391 

Safety Shoe sign, 491, 655, 677 

260 (Band Stand), 656-657 

construction, repair, and improvements, 667, 1116, 

1128 
current status, 272 
Flag Pole and. 648-649 
inactivation, 1137 
landmark plaque, 170, 197 
location, 990 
Monument, 668 
at Navy Yard closure, 182, 194 
relocation of Structure 279 (Monument) to, 1007 
as replacement for Building 163 (Band Stand), 169 
as replacement for Reviewing Stand, 993 

261 (Saluting Battery Gun Mount), 658-659 
construction, repair, and improvements, 155, 169, 

902-903 
current status, 273 
location, 56, 664 

262 (Bridge Crane Structure, Plate Yard), 112, 184, 211, 

543-544, 842-844 
Crane Rails W, X, Y, Z, 843-845 

263 (Pickling Tanks), 842-845. 846 

264 (Cooling Tower), 568, 571, 1142 

265 (Married Officers Quarters / Quarters B-F), 41 8-421 
Boundary Wall and, 741-742 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1833), 43, 45, 1029, 1084 

additions (1870s), 419 

Quarters C and D additions (1873), 1089 

Quarters E addition (1878), 1091 

kitchen addition (1920s), 419 

WPA projects, 419-421 

Garage addition (1941), 1049 

paint removal, repairs, and waterproofing (1 960), 

420, 444, 448, 1128 

gas-fired boilers, installation of (1974), 203 
conversion to office space for BNHP Interpreta- 
tion Division (2003), 1154 
rehabilitation, 230 

current status, 265, 273 

garages. 662 

Historic Structure Report (HSR), 8, 394 

location in Navy Yard, 56. 59 

location relative to 2nd St., 1012 

location relative to Building 204, 627 

location relative to Building Gun Park, 991 

location relative to Dry Dock 1 , 953 

location relative to Gate 2, 26 

location relative to Shot Park, 57 

on master plan (1828), 418 

at Navy Yard closure, 185 

occupants (1921), 102 

officers' families, 45 

in Preble History Gallery. 59 

redevelopment (in BNHP) 
BNHP housing, 421 

Constitution. USS, officers quarters, 421 
Northeast Museum Services Center, 226, 421, 

1148 
NPS offices. 224, 246, 421, 579, 1154 
Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation, 226, 

421, 1155 
rehabilitation, 230 

sidewalk, 1013. 1030 
in winter, 1006, 1093 

266 (Married Officers Quarters / Quarters L-0 / Captains 
Quarters). 434-437 

Boundary Wall and. 28-29, 742, 749-751 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1826), 43. 1078, 1080- 
1081 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 
266 

construction, repair, and improvements — Continued 

reconstruction to front Salem Turnpike (1835), 
43. 747, 1084 

alteration and repairs (1889), 1092 

front porch replacement (1924). 45, 1105 

kitchen additions (1929), 1105 

WPA projects, 436, 1106 

rehabilitation (1986), 1147 
current status, 265 
fence, 1084 
Garage, 114, 622 
gates, 815-816, 820 
location, 59, 624 
on master plan (1828), 33, 434 
National Register nomination, 197, 390 
at Navy Yard closure, 185 
occupants (1921), 102 
orientation, 45 
porch, 45, 1106 
in Preble History Gallery, 59 
redevelopment, 232, 238, 241, 246, 436-437, 1146- 

1147 
as Shipyard Commander's quarters, 43, 426 
tennis court, 643 
wall near street, 1022-1023 

267 (Gate House, Gate 1), 660 

construction, repair, and improvements, 26, 158, 1128 

current status, 272 

funding for, 811 

guard booths, 26 

location, 661, 812 

as replacement for Building 97 (Main Gate), 169 

signage, 826 

268 (Ash Silo), 568, 571. 1142 

269 (Married Officers Quarters Garages B-F), 662 
Boundary Wall and, 744. 746 
construction, repair, and improvements, 230 
current status, 273 

demolition (proposed), 218 

driveway, 1049 

Gate 1 Gate House. 417 

plan (1941), 813 

plan (original), 441 

270 (Historical Plaque), 170, 271, 663, 758 

271 (Paint Spray Booth). 191, 232, 1137. 1143 

272 (Ammunition Storage), 664-665 
construction, repair, and improvements, 155, 169, 

902-903, 1116 
current status, 273 
inactivation, 1137 
location, 659 
plan, 658 

273 (Grit Hopper), 666 

as character-defining feature, 373, 375 
construction, repair, and improvements, 170, 230, 654, 

903 
current status, 272 
at Navy Yard closure, 193 
recommendations for, 6, 391 

274 (Outside Electrical Substation), 190 

275 (Outside Electrical Substation), 208, 536-537 

276 (Historical Plaque), 170, 197, 657. 1134 

277 (Oxygen Storage & Filling) 
archival materials, 1189 
demolition, 868, 1149 

HAER documentation, 867-868, 1189 

hazardous materials remediation, 249 

inactivation, 1138 

location, 866. 868 

at Navy Yard closure, 193 

oxygen distribution system, 867 

redevelopment, 863, 868 

278 (Power Substation Building), 192, 668, 922-923 

279 (Monument), 169, 182, 272, 657, 667, 667-668, 993 

1006-1007, 1116, 1128 

279 (Paint House /AFP #5), 668 

280 (Underground Pipe Conduit / Utility Tunnel), 669- 

672 
Aboveground Steam Line, 570 
access hatch, 660 
Building 108 and, 564 
construction, repair, and improvements, 80, 564, 990, 

1004, 1036, 1097 
demolition by BRA, 672, 1037 
fuel oil distribution system, 630 
redevelopment, 672, 1037 
sidewalk, 71, 80, 1004-1005 

281 (Aboveground Steam Line), 673-674 
Building 103 section, 540 

as character-defining feature, 373, 375 
construction, repair, and improvements, 163. 170 
HAER documentation. 210 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Numbered Buildings & Structures 

281 — Continued 

line feeding Building 58 (Ropewalk). 568 

location, 1030 

at Navy Yard closure, 186 

Pier 1 and, 689, 903 

redevelopment 

demolition by BRA, 210, 552 
Groundplane Guidelines, 210, 552 

282 (Marine Barracks Torn Gate), 432, 675, 828 

283 (MBTA Bus Shelter), 676 

284 (Outside Seating Structure), 258. 674, 677 

285 (Security Barricades), 264, 266. 678, 681, 1009, 

1154-1155 

286 (U.S. Navy Guard Post). 679, 904 

287 (Visitor Screening Facility), 276, 679-680, 680, 685 

1154 

288 (NPS Guard Booth), 264, 266, 678, 681, 1155 

289 (Protection Dolphins), 159, 183, 275, 682, 907, 1116 

290 (USS Constitution Barrier), 276, 682, 683 

291 (Ferry Landing Shelter), 231, 684, 904, 1156 

292 (Visitor Screening Facility), 276. 679-680, 685, 904 

1027, 1157 
C-20. 988 
L-4 (Shed), 931 
M-1 (Emergency Generator House), 189, 579, 686, 900, 

1030 
M-2, 170. 903 
M-8 (Shed), 931 
M-10 (Shed), 931 

M-37 (Portable Steel Shed), 166, 190, 687-688, 1155 
(see also South Boston Annex - Facilities - Num- 
bered Buildings & Structures - M-37) 
M-38 (Portable Steel Shed), 689, 903 
M-39 (Steam Box Shed), 273, 689, 689, 903 
M-40 (USS Cassm Young Workshop / Shed), 690 
M-41 (Portable Shed), 691 
P-5 (Shed), 931 

P-010 (Bottled Gas Storage) (proposed), 157 
P-026 (Enlisted Men's Barracks) (proposed), 157 
P-054 (Incinerator) (proposed), 157 
P-084 (Missile Systems Shop) (proposed), 157 
P-090 (Chapel) (proposed), 157 
Other Structures & Facilities (not numbered] 

small-scale features, recommendations for, 6, 391 

streetscape features, recommendations for, 7, 392-393 

Administrative Offices, 130 (see also Building 39) 

Admiral's House (see Quarters G) 

Anchor & Chain Shed, 1097 

Anchor Park, 57, 558 

Antisubmarine Warfare Instructors School, 133 

Armory [10] (proposed). 33, 429 

Bachelor Officers' Club, 163 (see also Building 5) 

Barber Shop, 96 

basketball court, 641-642 

Biomedical Research Center (proposed), 234, 862 

Blacksmith's Shop, 33 

Blueprint & Reproduction Room, 187 

Boat Landing, 1079 

Boat Shop, 33 

Boatswain & Purser's Quarters. 1078-1079 

Boatswain's House |D], 33 

Boundary Fence, 737-739 

as character-defining feature, 4, 372-373 
construction, repair, and improvements, 28, 203, 863, 

1084 
demolition (partial), 822, 865 
Lower Yard, 747-749 
railroad tracks, 972 
recommendations for, 6, 391 
redevelopment, 203, 748 
Boundary Wall, 24, 26-29. 740-746 
architect, 456 
archival materials, 1182 
Building 1, incorporation into, 440-441 
Building 79, incorporation into, 531-532, 534 
Building 131 and, 858 
Building 204. incorporation into, 625. 627 
Building 269 and, 662 
as character-defining feature, 4, 372-374 
collapse, 737-738 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1820s), 24, 31. 1080. 1119 
western boundary of Navy Yard (1825), 810 
Salem Turnpike section (1826), 1081 
eastern boundary of Navy Yard (1843), 1085 
extension to Binney's Wharf (1845), 897 
western boundary of Navy Yard (1845). 1085 
extensions (mid 1850s), 41 
replacement with picket fence (Ropewalk sec- 
tion. 1929). 28, 104 
relocation (1970s), 218, 220 
current status, 265 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



1267 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

Other Structures & Facilities [not numbered] 
Boundary Wall — Continued 
demolition 

Pier 1 section (1899). 898, 1095 

Building 114 section (1902), 583-584 

for Gate 2 reconstruction (1940s), 26, 1012 

Henley St. section (1941), 26, 813 

for Mystic/Tobin Bridge (mid-1960s), 627 

for Chelsea-Water Streets Connector (1980s). 

427 
for Gate 6 construction (1994), 822 
demolition (proposed), 217-218, 1042 
gates, 815-816 
HABS documentation, 741 
HAER documentation, 746 
Lower Quarters Yard, 750-751 
Lower Yard, 747-749 

Marine Barracks Stable, incorporation of, 429 
National Register nomination photos, 385, 390 
North Boundary, 385 
Quarters A Wall, 272, 416-417 
Quarters G (Commandant's House), link to, 422, 427, 

758 
recommendations for, 6, 391 
relocation 

for Gate 5 (1894), 820 
Building 204 section (1980). 628 
for Chelsea-Water Streets Connector (1980s), 
220-221. 650, 758-759, 1145 
replacement 

with Boundary Fence, 28, 737-738, 816 
at Quarters L-O, 435, 747, 1084 
at Ropewalk, 1105 
seawall extension, 857 
signage, 660 
West Boundary, 385 
Building C (proposed), 862, 868 
Building Slip (see Building Ways) 
Building Ways (aka Building Slip), 842-843, 843n1 , 896, 

1078-1080 
Canal [19] (proposed), 33 
Canal [32] (proposed), 33, 528 
canals (proposed), 1016 
Cannon Shed (Pier 2), 753 
Car Storage Shed, 935 

Chain Forge, 6, 1124, 1179 (see also Building 40: Build- 
ing 42; Building 105) 
Chapel (see Building 23; Building 143) 
Chief Petty Officers Club, 312, 442-445 (see also Build- 
ing 4) 
City Toilet (Shipyard Park), 754 
Civilian Cafeteria, 923 (see also Building 28 Building 

36) 
Coal House, Wharf 66, 851 
Coal Shed, 1085 

Commandant's House Grounds, 627, 756-759, 1119 
Commandant's Office, 78, 1078 (see also Building 29; 

Building 32; Building 39) 
Commissary, 96 
Cordage Store, 1084 
Crane Tracks, 4, 968 

Curtain Gate (see Gates - USS Constitution Gate) 
Diver's Training Tank, 903 
Dockmaster's Office, 465, 710, 726, 894, 937 
Drafting Room, 498 

Dry Dock 1 Service Building (proposed), 155 
East Coast Sonar Eguipment Assemblies Repair Facil- 
ity (see East Coast Transducer Repair Facility) 
East Coast Sonar Transducer and Hydrophone Pool and 
Repair Facility (see East Coast Transducer Repair 
Facility) 
East Coast Transducer Repair Facility, 146, 150, 451, 

453, 1116, 1137 
electric light plant, 466 
Electronics Restoration Facility, 620 
Electronics School, 620 
Enamelling Building, 554 
Enlisted Men's Club (see Building 38) 
Eye Examination Clinic, 620 
fire hydrants, 41 

Fire Station, 187 (see also Building 6; Building 200) 
Flagstaff, 669, 990, 1006, 1029, 1079, 1092 (see also 

Structure 242) 
Flask Yard, 513-514, 1041, 1116 
"Flirtation Walk," 47, 57, 519, 524, 591 
Floating Derrick (see YD-2 (YD-2): YD-II (YD-11); YD- 
73(YD-13), KD-.?7(YD-21); YD-35 (YD-35); YD-38 
(YD-38); YD! 76 (YD-1 76)) 
Floating Machine Shop (see W?-/5(YR-15)) 
Foam Fire Protection System, 859 
Foundry Offices, 513-514 
Fuel Oil Pipeline, 902-903 
Fuel Oil Tank, 94 
capacity, 91, 102 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

Other Structures & Facilities |not numbered] 
Fuel Oil Tank — Continued 

construction, 91, 858-859 

demolition, 91, 134, 138, 861, 1108 

foundation, 859 

location, 91, 102, 116, 842. 860 

pipeline. 859 

redevelopment, 857 

replacement, 123 

safety features, 91 
Galley & Mess, 921 
gas lighting, 41, 1087 
Gasoline Tank 

capacity, 842 

construction, 842 

demolition, 138, 861, 1108 

location, 842, 844, 859 

mentioned, 94 

pipeline. 859 
"Green Store." 1079-1080 
Guard House (Quarters A), 416-417 
Gun House, 18, 1078 
Gun Park, 991 (see also Shipyard Mall) 

Band Stand, 656 

bollards made from contents, 80 

establishment, 1079 

fences, 1003 

Flag Pole, 648 

landscaping, 657, 756, 1097 

location, 56-57, 641n1, 651n1, 990, 1010 

as Muster Office location (proposed), 470 

ordnance storage, 38 

redevelopment, 1220 

storage capacity, 1084 

streets & roadways, 454, 1005, 1029, 1031 

Structure 280 (Underground Pipe Conduit) construc- 
tion, 669 

Tennis Courts on site of. 641 

upgrades, 41, 1084 

in winter, 1094 
Half-Moon Battery, 18, 1078, 1080 
Hammerhead Cranes, 982 

appraisal photos, 1141 

at Navy Yard closure, 189, 193 

demolition, 211, 540, 1128, 1139 

erection, 82, 983 

HAER documentation, 211 

Shipways, service of, 81, 137, 984 

Shipways 1 construction, 981 

World War II, 140 

HH-1, 170, 211, 982 

HH-2, 211, 982, 988, 1141 

HH-3, 154, 170, 211, 982 

HH-4, 81, 170. 211, 982, 1141 

HH-5, 170. 211, 982 

HH-6, 982, 988, 1128 

HH-7. 927, 982 
HarborView at the Navy Yard (ex-HarborView Point, ex- 
The Admiralty). 842-848 

The Admiralty, 247 

Boston HarborWalk. 847-848. 1054. 1156 

certificate of completion, 1156 

Chapter 91 license, 848, 856, 1155 

condominiums, 247, 1155 

construction, 242 

controversy, 844 

conversion from condominiums to rental apartments, 
1156 

current status, 273, 275 

landscaping, 848 

location, 242, 1009 

naming of, 380 

project approvals, 1156 

public amenities to mitigate construction, 856 

redevelopment of Parcel 4A as, 545 

water shuttle (water taxi) dock. 238, 275 
Hurdle Shed. 1079 
Industrial Management Office, 625 
Industrial Relations Office, 27, 29, 443 (see also Build- 
ing 58; Labor Board; Labor Board Office) 
Ingram Club, 493, 608-609, 641, 996 
Labor Board Office, 133, 1058, 1112 (see also Building 
4; Building 58; Industrial Relations Office; Labor 
Board) 
Laborers Quarters, 1078 
landscaping, 1079-1080 
laydown spaces. 5, 7, 382. 393 
Library, 96, 447 
Lime Shed, 1078 
Locomotive Cranes, 124 

at Dry Dock 2, 975 

at Dry Dock 5, 976 

authorization, 1096-1097 

diesel-powered cranes, 974-975 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

Other Structures & Facilities |not numbered] 
Locomotive Cranes — Continued 

HAER documentation, 212, 976 

number of. 974 

pile driver mounted on. 637 

sale of. 976 

servicing Marine Railway 11, 184. 833 

steam-powered cranes. 974 

storage on Pier 1 . 903 

4, 124 

6, 782. 973 

9. 975 

11, 931 

15, 76 

24, 100 

114, 913 
Locomotives, 71, 80. 123, 550, 782, 971-975, 1095 

1, 973 

3, 123, 975 

4, 123 

lunch stands. 480. 923 

Magazine [K], 18, 33. 1078, 1081, 1083 

Mail Room. 620 

Main Gate (see Gate lj 

Marine Barracks (Building I), 428-433 

alphabetical designation of. 18. 102. 429-430 

archival materials. 1189 

Bachelor Enlisted Quarters. 433 

Barracks Supply Officer. 431 (see also Middleton. 

Austin B.) 
Boundary Wall and, 27, 741-743. 746 
as character-defining feature, 4, 372-374 
Commanding Officer, 20, 668, 1131 (see also 
McCawley, Charles G,; O'Neill, John T; Pope, 
Percival C; Wojcik, Thaddeus P) 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1811). 16, 18. 428. 1078 

repairs (Civil War era). 18. 429. 1087-1088 

alterations (1890s), 18. 430, 1092 

additional story addition (1898), 18. 430, 1095 

electric lights, installation of (1904). 1097 

WPA projects. 18, 109. 117. 430-431 

paint removal (1948), 431, 1116 

enclosure of upper floor porches (1 951 ), 1 8. 431 . 

1116 
gas-Fired boilers, installation of (1974), 203 
rehabilitation (2006), 231, 433,1146. 1155 
current status, 265 
design, 365 

Executive Officer (see Anthony, William S ) 
gates, 815-816 
Globe & Anchor Club, 431 
Historic Structure Report (HSR), 8, 394, 429n2 
historical significance, 20, 197. 197n420 
history of, 16. 18-19 
Lime Shed as, 1078 
location, 37. 44, 56, 738, 829 
Marine Commanding Officer s Quarters (1-5). 430. 433 
Marine detachment, 20-21 
on master plan (1828). 33, 429 
National Register nomination photos, 390 
at Navy Yard closure, 185 
officers quarters (1-1 through 1-4), 430 
ownership of. 197n420, 432-433, 631, 1131 
parade, 254 
picket fence, 1080 
rededication, 1151 
redevelopment (in BNHP) 

Historical and Urban Studies Program, 260 
NPS use 

housing for seasonal employees, 1145 
Northeast Museum Services Center, 226. 

1148. 1155 
NPS ownership of. 432-433 
offices. 225. 579. 1146 
Protection Division offices. 224 
Superintendent s office. 224. 1146 
rehabilitation, 231, 1146, 1155 
residential use, 246, 1145 
theme museum (proposed), 215 
replacement (proposed), 429, 981 
Stable, 428-429, 741 
steam heat, 1092 
streets & roadways, 1031 
vehicle access. 1056-1057 
War of 1812 19 
well, 432-433 
in winter, 1093-1094 
Marine Barracks Parade Ground 827-829 
cannon display. 18, 102, 828-829 
as character-defining feature, 4. 372, 374 
Commandants Office relocation 1087 
Constitution, USS, Bicentennial Salute 1152 
Marine detachment 21. 1216 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1 244 = Volume 3 



1268 



Index 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

Other Structures & Facilities [not numbered] 

Marine Barracks Parade Ground — Continued 

National Register nomination photos. 390 

retaining wall, 190, 430-431 

site layout, 1078 

snowman, 829 

stairs, 430, 1010 

streets & roadways, 1013. 1056-1057 

surrounding buildings and structures, 1033 

Torii Gate construction, 675 

transfer from Navy to Marine Corps (1964), 19 

Underground Pipe Conduit, 670 

underground tanks, 629, 631-632 

utility access vaults in retaining wall, 431 
Marine Hospital Reservation, 18. 29. 434, 1080-1081 
Mast House, 1084 (see also Building 85) 
Masting Shears [P), 33. 897, 1080, 1084. 1162 
MBTA Ferry Passenger Shelters, 838 
Muster Office (see Building 31) 
Naval Prison (see Building 38) 
Navy Yard Research Center (proposed), 868 
Navy Yard Rowhouses, 242, 247, 272, 847-848, 849- 

850 
Officers Club (see Building 5) 
Old Magazine, 33 

Oxygen Distribution Piping System, 867 
Petty Officers Club, 158, 259, 448-449. 1200 {see also 

Building 4) 
Pitch House, 1081 
Plate Field (aka Plate Yard), 845 

location, 184, 843, 847, 1053-1054 

Plate Field Crane, 808 (see also Structure 262) 

railroad tracks, 974 

redevelopment, 841, 849 

wheelabrator, 844-845 

WPA projects, 109. 112. 843, 845, 1042, 1052 
Plate Yard (see Plate Field) 
Portal Cranes (see Portal Cranes) 
Post Office, 94, 97 (see also Building 34) 
Public Works Administrative Offices. 187 (see also Build- 
ing 107, Building 200) 
Quay Wall, 24, 56-57, 142, 1045, 1053 
Quay Walls [58], 33. 1085 
Radio Towers, 452, 519, 828, 1106, 1116 
railroad cranes (see Locomotive Cranes) 
railroad system extension authorization. 1096-1097 
Railroad Tracks, 970-977 (see also Railroad Gate) 

authorization for, 1095 

Building 104 tracks, 542-543 

Building 105 Roundhouse, 550-551 

Building 105 tracks, 550-551 

Building 107 tracks. 560 

Building 108 tracks, 560 

Building 187 tracks, 1017 

as character-defining feature, 4, 372 

construction, repair, and improvements 
original construction (1865), 52 
expansion (early 1900s), 71, 80 
extension (1910s), 74 
WPA projects, 113, 974, 1020 
modernization (1939), 122-123 
reconstruction (1950s), 164 
revisions (1960s), 158, 1007, 1027 

footage of track, 1098, 1118 

inauguration, 1088 

Lincoln Ave. and, 1026 

Locomotive Cranes (see Locomotive Cranes) 

Locomotives (see Locomotives) 

plan (1905), 971 

plan (1942), 975 

plan (1971). 976 

redevelopment 

BRA track removal, 976-977, 1008-1009. 1046 
Groundplane Guidelines, 248, 382, 977 

sidewalk design and. 519 

on Third Ave., 559. 1016 
Receiving Ship, 55, 58, 994, 1080 (see also Franklin, 
USS (ship-of-the-line); Independence, USS (ship- 
of-the-line); Ohio. USS (ship-of-the-line); Soulhery, 
USS (IX-26); Wabash. USS (steam frigate)) 
Recreation Field, 996 

Building 195 construction, 119, 612, 995 

Building 197 construction, 995 

location, 612. 994-995 

materiel storage, 94 

Navy Day (1916), 1102 

railroad tracks, 973, 996 

redevelopment, 994, 1221 
Refuse Burner. 864 

Saluting Battery. 1081. 1085 (see also Building 49; Struc- 
ture 261) 
Saw Pit & Water Cask Storage Shed, 1078 
Scrap Bins, 864-866, 868 
Scrap Yard, 638 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

Other Structures & Facilities (not numbered] — Continued 
Security Office, 187 
Sentry House (see Building 1) 
sewer system, 1092, 1096, 1180 
Shears. 1081. 1092. 1220 (see also Masting Shears) 
Ship Electronic Systems Evaluation Facility. 1131, 1134 
Shiphouses, 23 (see also Building 68 |H], Building 71 |l]; 
Building 73 [39]; Building 92) 

belfry, 463 

demolition, 16, 22 

location, 510 

original. 22, 1120 

purpose of, 16, 22-23. 1120 

Commandant's request for (1813). 1079 

G 

authorization for, 1080 
belfry, 1080 
construction, 24, 896 
demolition, 22-23, 896, 1085 
location. 29, 37 
on master plan (1828), 33 
quay wall and fence, 1084 
replaced by Building 92, 22-23, 896, 1089 
replacing original shiphouse, 22-23 
Shipkeepers & Foremen's Office (see Building 100) 
Shipways Condominium 

design and construction, 985 

location, 242, 841 

master deed, 1146 

naming of. 380 

Shipways I, 247, 841, 985, 1146 

Shipways II. 242, 247, 273, 841, 988, 1146 

waterfront transformation, 277 
Shipways Garage, 269, 841, 988, 1044, 1146 
Shipyard Cafeteria, 1116 
Shipyard Mall, 990-993 (see also Gun Park) 

anchors, 993 

as character-defining feature, 373, 656 

current status, 272 

fuel oil distribution system, 630 

landscaping, 641 n1, 657 

Navy Yard disestablishment ceremony, 182 

railroad tracks. 975 

as steel storage area. 657, 757 

streets & roadways, 1005, 1013 

Tennis Court, 272 

wireless mast, 452, 990 
Shipyard Park (Recreation Parcel), 239, 994-999 

boundaries, 221 

BRA, Parcel transfer to, 213, 259, 997, 1139 

Building 197 inclusion in, 616 

Building 230 inclusion in, 636 

City Toilet, 754 

construction, 491, 1139 

current status, 271, 273 

deed, 1139 

definitions, 994n1 

Dry Dock 2 and, 594, 786, 1025 

Dry Dock 2 boardwalk, 786 

fountain and performance area, 613 

historical integrity, 380 

location, 1039, 1143, 1221 

Massachusetts Korean War Veterans Memorial (see 
Massachusetts Korean War Veterans Memo- 
rial) 

NPS license for use of Baxter Rd,, 1149 

opening, 253 

Phase I, 238, 1144 

Phase II, 998, 1145 

Phase III, 221, 962, 998, 1147 

Phase IV, 914 

Pier 4 inclusion in, 919 

plan (1976). 233, 997 

portal crane tracks, 968 

on site of former Recreation Field, 996 

streets & roadways, 1025. 1034-1035, 1039, 1149 

Tot's Lot, 998-999 

Town Dock, 919, 1145 

Town Pier, 238 

trash receptacles, 382 
Shipyard Quarters Manna, 839-840 

access ramp on Pier 6, 929 

Building 224 relocation and rehabilitation, 634 

Chapter 91 license, 856, 1155 

construction, repair, and improvements, 856. 1145- 
1146. 1155 

current status. 272, 274 

developer, 241 

floating bed-and-breakfast inn, 247 

floating wave attenuator, 840 

location, 238. 856. 933 

Phase II, 634. 937 

Pier 6 development, 635, 929 

slips, 238. 241 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

Other Structures & Facilities (not numbered] — Contunn'il 
Shot Park 

buildings located on, 618, 641, 1087 

cannon, 669 

fences. 1003 

location. 57. 475, 827, 991. 1031 

as staging area for Structure 280 construction, 669 

Tennis Courts, 75, 80, 641, 828 

upgrades (1850s), 41 

in winter, 827, 1094 
Smithery |0], 33, 466, 508, 508n1, 1080-1081 
Spar & Boat Shed, 1079 
Storage Sheds [41-50], 33 
Storehouse. 19, 1078-1079 
Teamsters Gate (see Gate 5) 
Tennis Courts (see also Structure 236; Structure 237) 

construction, repair, and improvements, 80, 109, 155, 
618-620 

current status, 620 

fencing, 71 

location, 75, 618-619. 828 

purpose. 618-619 
Timber Dock (see also Structure 87, Structure 90/91) 

bridge repair. 1084 

buildings on site of, 842 

causeway, 1034 

creation of, 1078 

dredging, 69 

enclosed by Battery Wharf (Ordnance Wharf), 658 

Fuel Oil Tank, 1099 

infill, 780, 996. 1088 

location, 29, 56, 842, 994 

on master plan (1828), 33 

size, 1078 

swinging gates, 1084 
Timber Shed, 1078-1079 
Timber Shed No 30, 1084 
Timber Storage Shed, 1078 
Trade School, 97 
Transducer Repair Facility (see East Coast Transducer 

Repair Facility) 
trash receptacles, 7, 375, 382, 393, 600. 1130, 1132 

as character-defining feature, 4, 372 
Utility Conduit (see Structure 280) 
utility systems 

BRA projects. 1008, 1037, 1144-1145 

compressed air system, 570 

drainage system, 1095 

electrical system, 569, 1092. 1097. 1144 

fire-protection system. 1096 

fuel oil system, 630 

fuel system, 629-630 

heating system, 570, 1096-1097 

oxygen system, 867 

sewer system. 1092, 1096, 1180 

steam distribution system, 674 

underground conduit system, 1096 

water system, 41, 63, 1092. 1096 
volleyball court, 641 
War Memorial (see Structure 279) 
Watchmen's Quarters. 447 

Water Transportation Dock, 222, 275, 588-589, 684, 856 
Waterfront Offices, 98 (see also Building 47; Building 

109) 
WAVES barracks (see Building 198) 
Weighers Office (proposed). 454 
Wet Basin [52], 33, 994 
Wireless Mast, 451-452, 899-900. 990 
Yard's End 

in BRA master plan. 235, 237, 588. 868, 1148 

current status, 274, 380 

demolition of buildings and structures. 249, 380 

development pace, 231, 380 

hotel (proposed). 247 

master plan, 862. 868 

Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital. 1155 
Yard's End Research Center (proposed), 862, 868 
Yarn Mill, 524 
Parcels 

map. 204 

1A, 616. 1147 

1A1. 1147 

1B. 1155 

1B-1.839. 839, 929. 1145 

1C. 1054, 1155 

2, 514 

2B, 929, 1145 

2B-1.839, 929, 1145 

2C, 1054, 1145-1146, 1154 

3A, 540, 1146 

3B, 932, 1147 

3B- 1.840, 1146 

3C, 937 

3C-1. 840, 1146 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



- 1269 - 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Parcels — Continued 
3D, 1054, 1145, 1154 
3E, 985, 1146 
3F, 985, 1146 
3G, 1054, 1146 
3H, 989. 1146 
31, 544, 1149 
3J, 634, 1054, 1146 
3K, 841,985, 1146 

4, 235, 238, 242, 247, 868, 1054, 1155-1156 
4A, 545, 842-848, 844, 847, 856, 1054 
4A-1, 545, 849-850, 1147 
4A2, 1155 
4B, 809, 851-856 
4C, 1054, 1155 
4D, 1054, 1155 
4E, 1155 
5 

Boston HarborWalk, 944, 1054 

BRA parcel division, 857 

current status, 274 

demolition of abandoned structures, 244 

Dry Dock 5 guidelines, 809 

HAER documentation, 945 

location, 857, 863 

in New Development Area, 944 

Pier 11 guidelines, 944 

reuse proposals, 945 

structures included in, 857, 863, 944 

6, 857-862 

allowable uses, 861-862 

as Biomedical Research Center, 862 

Boston HarborWalk, 1054 

in BRA master plan (1990), 530, 1148 

BRA parcel division, 857 

BRA proposals for, 862 

building demolition, 861-862, 868, 1018 

current status, 273 

demolition of abandoned structures, 244 

development rights, 1155 

location, 857, 863 

redevelopment guidelines, 861-862 

rehabilitation, 868 

Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, 237. 237n608, 

1155, 1157 
structures located in, 857, 944, 1148 
vacancy, 1046 
Yard's End Research Center (proposed), 862, 868 

7, 863-868 

Boston HarborWalk, 1054 

BRA parcel division, 857 

building demolition, 868, 1018 

current status, 273 

demolition of abandoned structures, 244 

development rights, 237, 1155 

financing, 237 

fuel tank (proposed), 859 

light industrial use guidelines, 868 

location, 857 

in New Development Area, 868 

rehabilitation, 868 

sale to BRA, 868 

vacancy, 1046 

Yard's End Research Center (proposed), 862, 868 
39A (Building 39A), 244, 247, 249, 505, 1154 
150 

Armed Services YMCA. 236. 241. 243, 611, 1149 

BRA and, 130, 611, 1147-1149 

Constitution Inn & Fitness Center, 247, 271 , 608, 61 1 , 
1156 

developer, 1147 

lease, 611, 1148-1149 
200 

BRAand, 130, 232, 486-487, 1144 

Building 34 wing additions, 243 

building demolition, 130, 236 

HAER documentation, 487 

in national park proposal, 199 
Piers & Wharves 

as character-defining feature, 4, 372 
reconstruction (1930-1932), 106 
1 896-905 

Aboveground Steam Line, 673, 1128 

anchor storage, 558 

buildings on. 78. 450, 565, 680, 689-690, 1095 

as ceremonial site. 579, 658. 902-903 

construction, repair, and improvements 

reconstruction (turn of the 20th century), 68 
Boundary Wall and, 742, 1095 
building construction, 1097 
building demolition, 580. 1095. 1097 
building relocation, 65, 450 
coaling plant, 24, 70 
contract for, 1096 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Piers & Wharves 
1 

construction, repair, and improvements 
reconstruction — Continued 
financing, 70n177, 580 
in Fitchburg Slip project, 70. 70n177 
deck repair (1908), 900, 1098 
repairs (1919). 900 

WPA projects, 109, 112, 900-901, 1029-1030, 
1106 
crane tracks, 901 
current status, 1, 273 
deterioration, 900 
Dry Dock 1 caisson, 772 
Electrical Substation, 1106 
fuel oil distribution system, 629-630 
Grit Hopper, 666 
harbor line exemption, 1157 
location, 52 

at Navy Yard closure, 183, 904 
portal cranes, 124, 959, 1109 
railroad tracks, 674, 901, 974-977, 1026-1027 
recommendations for, 6, 391 
redevelopment (in BNHP) 

Amelia Occasions tent space, 226 

art exhibits, 688 

Boston HarborWalk. 392 

Ferry Landing, 263, 659, 770, 1144, 1156-1157 

Ferry Landing Barges, 222, 451, 904-905, 905 

Ferry Landing Shelter, 684 

festivals and events, 253-255, 1149, 1151. 1154, 

1157 
monument dedication, 1154 
NPS rehabilitation projects (1980-1981), 226- 

227, 916, 976-977, 1144 
NPS rehabilitation projects (1999-2000), 230, 

575, 665, 904, 1027, 1151 
NPS rehabilitation projects (2009), 231 
security screening, 264, 680, 1154 
tour bus parking, 224 
Safety Shoe sign, 655 
Saluting Battery, 658. 664 
ship commissioning, 154, 252, 903, 1145, 1200 
ship repair, 135-136 

ship transfer ceremonies, 903, 1135-1136 
ships at 

Albatross //(aka Patuxent, USS), 900 
AM-483 (AM-483) (aka Mercur. HRNLMS (A-856) 
/ Onverschrokken, HRNLMS (M-886), 903 
Billfish. USS (SS-286), 303 
Bounty, HMS (replica ship), 253 
Britannia. HMY, 254, 264, 1150 
Cassin Young. USS (DD-793), 254, 258, 382, 

688, 690, 903, 1145, 1154, 1157 
Charlottestown. HMCS (FFH-339). 257 
Chatham. HMS (F-87), 257, 682-683 
Chicopee (YTM-747) (aka LT-1966. USAV). 578 
Colleton. USS (APB-36 / APL-36), 149 
Constellation. USS (IX-20). 147, 159, 175, 682, 

902, 906, 1180 
Constitution. USS (IX-21) (aka Old Constitution. 
"Old Ironsides") 
1900-1910, 172, 576, 772 
1940s, 147, 175, 253, 682 
1960s, 578 

1970s, 194, 202, 902, 906 
1990s, 257. 690, 1149, 1180 
2007, 263 

Bicentennial Salute, 904, 1152-1153 
Protection Dolphins, 682 
Conway. USS (DD-507), 148 
Dealey. USS (DE-1006). 654 
Eagle. USCG (WIX-327), 1153, 1157 
Friendship of Salem (replica merchant ship), 262 
Hawkins. USS (DD-873), 903 
Jakob Van Heemskerk. HNLMS (F-812), 257 
Kearny, USS (DD-432). 135 
Libertad, ARA (Q-2), 904, 1152 
LT-1966, USAV (aka Chicopee (YTM-747)). 578 
Massachusetts, USS (BB-2), 576 
OCallaghan, USS (DE-1051), 579 
Robert Bradley, USS (FFG-49), 257 
Rommel. FGNS (D-187) (aka DDG-30), 1135- 

1136 
Samuel Eliot Morison. USS (FFG-13), 253-254, 

1145 
Thomas C Hart, USS (DE-1092), 903 
Vital, USS (MSO-474), 252 
YC-531 {YC-W\), 900 
YFN-256 (YFN-256), 147 
on site plan (1913), 574 
streets & roadways. 163 
telephone lines, 227 
tug operations, 577-578 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Piers & Wharves 
1 — Continued 

Underground Pipe Conduit, 672 
visiting ships, 254, 256-257, 683, 691, 1150 
wireless mast, 451-452 
1 USS Constitution Pier (aka Finger Pier), 906-907 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1940s), 155, 159, 682 
replacement (1960s), 183 
rehabilitation (1980-1981), 226-227, 1144 
rehabilitation (1999-2000), 230 
rehabilitation (2007), 231 
current status, 274 
entrance, 183 
safety zone, 1149 
ships at, 1180 

Small Boat Docking Facility, 230, 907 
sub-surface drawings, 1180 

2, 908-911 

ceremonies, 910 

as character-defining feature, 373, 375 

concrete deck area, 899 

Constitution, USS 

storage shed. 176, 753, 911 

construction, repair, and improvements 
original construction (1906), 915, 1098 
Phase I reconstruction (1984). 1146 
Phase II reconstruction (1986). 1147 
Phase III reconstruction (1987). 1147 
NPS rehabilitation projects. 226, 228, 230. 910- 
911 

current status, 274 

deterioration, 910-911 

fire, 1154 

at Navy Yard closure. 184 

railroad tracks, 74. 831, 833, 909. 974. 1099 

recommendations for. 6, 391 

redevelopment (in BNHP) 

educational programs. 260-261 

Hull Lifesaving Museum boatbuilding program. 

225. 1154 
NPS rehabilitation projects, 226, 228, 230, 910- 
911 

replacement (proposed), 171. 767. 913 

ships at 

Cassin Young, USS (DD-793). 252. 774, 911 
Constitution, USS (IX-21) (aka Old Constitution. 
"Old Ironsides"), 74, 173-174. 765, 909, 915 
Don Chedi. HTMS (MSC-8), 910 
Francis M Robinson. USS (DE-220), 148 
Lynx. USS (SP-2), 83. 909 
Norns, USS (DD-859). 909 
Pone St. Louis. HMCS (YMG-183), 911 
Virginia. USS (BB-13). 909 

wharf encompassing (proposed), 834 

in winter, 832 

World War I. 83 

3, 912-914 

as character-defining feature. 375 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1905), 780, 1097 

reconstruction (1930), 106 

paving (1931), 1048 

rehabilitation (1980-1981), 1144 

BRA removal of inner portion, 916 

reconstruction plans (2007), 914 
demolition, 1146 
deterioration, 184, 262, 914 
Dry Dock caissons. 152, 785 
float, 915-916 

location in Navy Yard, 52, 1053 
at Navy Yard closure, 184 
railroad tracks, 912-913, 930. 972, 1098 
recommendations for, 6, 391 
redevelopment (in Shipyard Park) 

BRAand, 262, 914, 1146, 1149, 1156 

ferry landing, 838 

NPS, transfer to, 205 

reconstruction (proposed), 238 

rehabilitation, 1144 

reuse for recreational purposes, 785 

water shuttles, 919, 1156 
replacement (proposed), 171. 767, 913 
ships at 

Constitution. USS (IX-21) (aka Old Constitution; 
"Old Ironsides"), 173 

Nantucket II. USCG (WLV-613). 786, 914 

Spirit of Massachusetts (sail training vessel), 262, 
914 

Water Barge No. 5 (YW-5), 91 5 

YP-5 (YP-5). 913 
in Shore Station Development Plan, 155 
wharf encompassing (proposed), 834 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



1270 



Index 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Piers & Wharves — Continued 
3 Marginal Wharf, 915-916 

as character-defining feature, 375 

construction, repair, and improvements, 226, 231 , 91 2. 

1155 
current status, 274 
location, 912-913 
Marine Railway and, 835 
redevelopment, 225-226, 905, 916, 1144, 1155 
ships at, 915 
size, 912 
4,917-919 

access to, 1025 
Constitution, USS 

restoration materials, arrival of, 996 
construction, repair, and improvements 
original construction (1905), 780, 1097 
extension (proposed, 1918), 920, 926 
extension (proposed, 1919), 84 
extension (World War II), 122, 917, 927-928, 

1107, 1112 
replacement with concrete pier (1950s), 155, 
918-919 

authorization for, 1125 
contractor, 928 
cost, 161, 928 
electrical substations, 569 
Industrial Service Building, 193, 635-636, 

919 
light towers, 652, 918-919 
plan. 926 

portal crane purchases, 952, 954 
portal crane track extension, 155, 1053,1125 
in progress photos, 161. 918 
size, 918 
current status, 271. 274 
Fire Pump House. 168 
mactivation, 1137 

Industrial Services Building, 193, 635-636, 919 
location in Navy Yard, 52, 94, 104, 1053 
oxygen distribution system, 867 
plan (1900), 920 

portal crane tracks, 155, 952, 959, 968, 1053, 1125 
portal cranes, 952, 954 
quay wall, 1053 
railroad tracks, 917, 972, 1098 
recommendations for, 6, 391 
redevelopment (in Shipyard Park) 
BRA and, 919, 1149 
Courageous Sailing Center, 925, 1147 
educational programs, 260-261, 261n751 
festivals and events, 253 
NPS, transfer to, 205 
reuse for recreational purposes, 785 
as Shipyard Park, Phase II, 998 
shuttle buses, 223 
visiting ships, 254, 256 

water transportation, 222-223, 238, 838, 919, 
1147, 1155-1156 
ships at 

Apache, USS (SP-729), 921 
Cassm Young, USS (DD-793), 252 
Constitution, USS (IX-21) (aka Old Constitution, 

"Old Ironsides"), 94. 104, 173, 1053 
Courageous (yacht), 260 
Damato, USS (DD-871), 917 
Dortch, USS (DD-712), 918 
Doyle, USS (FFG-39). 919 
Iroquois. HMCS (DDH-280). 274 
John King. USS (DDG-3), 919 
Lester, USS (DE-1022), 636 
Stembel. USS (DD-634), 918 
Willis A. Lee, USS (DL-4), 652, 919 
YGN-40 (YGN-40). 636 
4A (see Pier 5 (ex-Pier 4A)) 
5 (see Pier 6 (ex-Pier 5)) 
5 (ex-Pier 4A), 920-925 

construction, repair, and improvements 
original construction (1911), 1099 
extension (proposed, 1918), 920, 926 
extension (proposed, 1919), 84 
reconstruction (1930s), 106, 921 
lengthening (1941), 927-928. 1107 
replacement of Pier 4A with new Pier 5 (1941), 

122, 133, 577. 920, 922, 927. 1108 
seawall (1945), 1115 
rehabilitation (1963-1964), 924 
current status, 271 
deterioration, 925 

location in Navy Yard, 104, 577, 929 
at Navy Yard closure, 182, 192 
Navy Yard Sesquicentennial, 148 
oxygen distribution system, 867 
Paint House, 668 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Piers & Wharves 

5 (ex-Pier 4A) — Continued 

portal crane tracks, 161,922.929,952,959.968, 1125 
portal cranes, 922, 954, 956, 959, 962. 1108 
quay wall, 1053 
redevelopment (in New Development Area) 

BRA and 

BRA master plan (1990), 922 

land disposition agreements, 925, 1155 

Pier Management Plan, 1149 

sale to, 922 

building removal, 922 

condominiums (proposed), 380 

design guidelines, 922 

in New Development Area, 922 

public access, 275 

Residences at Pier 5, 247. 925 

walkway easements, 260 
renumbering of, 122n270, 921, 988 
ship conversions, 152, 924 
ships at 

Albany. USS (CA-123 / CG-10), 924, 954 

Bridgepon. USS (Id. No. 3009), 921 

Constitution, USS (IX-21) (aka Old Constitution, 
"Old Ironsides"), 921 

Conyngham. USS (DD-371), 108 

Decatur, USS (DD-936 / DDG-31), 152, 962 

FortMandan. USS (LSD-21) (aka Nafkratoussa 
(L-153)), 142 

G-2, USS (SS-27), 921 

Goodrich, USS (DDR-831), 924 

Howard W. Gilmore. USS (AS-16), 148 

Kenneth D. Bailey, USS (DDR-713), 924 

i-77. USS (SS-51), 921 

LSr-310. USS (LST-310/ATL-310) (aka Aeolus, 
USS (ARL-42)), 133 

Marlboro, USS (APB-38 / APL-38), 139 

Mercer, USS (APB-39 / IX-502 / APL-39). 139 

Richard L. Page, USS (DEG-5), 924 

Sampson, USS (DDG-10), 919 

service craft, 192 

Southery. USS (IX-26), 104 

Suffolk County, USS (LST-1173), 154 

Tonopah, USS (BM-8), 921 

YC-763 (YC-763), 148 

KF/V-m?(YFN-302), 924 
World War II, 139, 142 

6 (see Pier 7 (ex-Pier 6)) 
6(ex-Pier5),926-929 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1904-1905), 74, 920, 926, 

1097 
extension (proposed, 1918), 920, 926 
extension (proposed, 1919), 84 
reconstruction (1931), 106, 926 
extension and rehabilitation (World War II), 122, 

927-928, 1107-1108, 1113, 1115 
replacement with concrete pier (1 956-1 957), 1 55, 
928-929 
authorization for, 918, 928, 1125 
contractor, 928 
cost, 161, 928 
electrical substations, 569 
Industrial Service Building, 193, 635-636 
light towers, 653, 928 
plan, 926 

portal crane purchases, 952, 954 
portal crane tracks. 922, 1125 
in progress photos, 161, 928 
size, 928 
current status. 274-275 
Hammerhead Cranes, 927, 983, 1165 
Industrial Services Building, 168, 193, 635-636 
location in Navy Yard, 52, 929, 1053 
at Navy Yard closure, 182, 193 
Navy Yard Sesquicentennial, 148 
oxygen distribution system, 867 
portal crane collapse, 1131 
portal crane tracks, 929, 932, 952, 959, 968, 1125, 

1128 
portal cranes, 959 
railroad tracks, 1099 
recommendations for, 391 
redevelopment (in New Development Area) 
BRA and, 929, 1149 

conveyance to Shipyard Marina Trust, 1145 
marinas, 277 

preservation guidelines, 929 
Shipyard Quarters Marina, 238, 241, 839-840, 

929, 1145 
Tavern on the Water. 259 
renumbering of, 122n270, 921. 928, 988 
ships at 

battleships, 1053 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Piers & Wharves 

6 (ex-Pier 5) 

ships at — Continued 

Calcaterra, USS (DER-390). 929 
Case, USS(DD-370), 108 
Conyngham. USS (DD-371), 108 
Cowie. USS (DD-632 / DMS-39), 1165 
Eagle 27. USS, 927 
Eagle 48. USS, 927 
Echols. USS (APB-37 / IX-504), 1165 
Knight. USS (DD-633 / DMS-40). 1166 
Perry, USS (DD-844). 150 
Wilkinson, USS (DL-5), 635 
VF/V-.?a?(YFN-302). 635 

World War II, 139 

7 (ex-Pier 6), 930-933 

appraisal photos. 1141 
but, brow, and bollard, 1195 
construction, repair, and improvements 
original construction (1900), 1095 
modernization effort (1900s), 1096 
extension (proposed, 1918), 920, 926, 930 
extension (proposed. 1919). 84 
extension and rehabilitation (World War II), 122, 

1112-1113, 1115 
replacement with concrete pier (mid- 1 950s), 155. 
931-932 

authorization for. 931. 1125 
contractor. 931-932 
cost, 161, 931-932 
dedication, 1128 
electrical substations, 569 
Industrial Service Building, 193, 635-636 
light towers, 932 

portal crane purchases, 942, 952, 954 
portal crane tracks, 922. 932. 1128 
size, 931 
steam line. 170 
Switching Station, 613 
replacement (proposed, 1960s), 855 
current status, 275 
HAER documentation, 212 
hammerhead cranes, 982 
Industrial Services Building, 193, 635-636 
location in Navy Yard, 52, 929, 1053 
at Navy Yard closure, 184 
Navy Yard Sesquicentennial, 148 
oxygen distribution system, 867 
portal crane tracks, 932. 952, 959, 968, 1128 
portal cranes, 956, 964 
railroad tracks, 930, 972, 1098 
redevelopment (in New Development Area) 
BRA and 

conveyance to Immobiliare New England, 

1147 
Pier Management Plan, 1149 
public access to pier, 933 
purchase of, 932 
Constellation Wharf Condominium, 242. 247, 

260, 277, 380, 1147 
development guidelines. 932 
floating wave attenuator, 840 
Navy Yard Realty Trust, purchase of, 1147 
public access to, 260, 260n746, 932-933 
townhouse construction, 246 
renumbering of, 122n270. 921. 931. 988 
ship commissioning ceremonies, 1200-1201 
ship conversions, 152 
ships at 

Albany. USS (CA-123 / CG-10), 929 
Bache, USS (DDE-470). 931 
battleships, 1053 
Fle'cher-c\ass destroyers, 148 
Hawkins, USS (DD-873), 933 
Kalamazoo. USS (AOR-6). 1200-1201 
LSDs, cover, 1 79 
Olympia. USS (C-6 / IX-40), 1096 
Pensacola, USS (LSD-38), cover, 179 
Springfield, USS (CLG-7) (aka CL-66), 152 
Virginia-class battleship, 931 
steam line, 170, 568, 606 
streets & roadways, 933 
7 |64] (ex -Wharf 4) 

construction, repair, and improvements, 134, 1085, 

1095-1096 
demolition, 122n270. 137. 851. 921. 931. 986. 988. 

1053, 1108 
fuel pipeline, 859 
location, 851 

on master plan (1828), 851, 986. 988 
portal crane tracks, 952 
privies, 596 

renumbering of, 851, 1095 
ships at. 1053, 1103 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



1271 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Piers & Wharves — Continued 

8 [65] (ex-Wharf 5), 934-937 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1845), 1085 

extension (1900). 1095 

reconstruction (1930), 106 

WPA projects, 935 

extension (World War II), 122, 1112 

replacement (proposed, 1960s), 161 

enlargement (proposed, 1967), 855 
demolition (proposed), 840 
deterioration, 937 
mactivation, 1137 
location, 846, 851, 856 
on master plan (1828), 934 
at Navy Yard closure, 184 
pipeline, 859 

railroad tracks, 934-935, 970 
redevelopment (in New Development Area) 

BRA and, 937, 1146, 1149 

floating wave attenuator, 840 

Immobiliare New England, conveyance to, 1146 

Navy Yard Realty Trust, purchase by, 1147 

as Parcel 3C. 937 

redevelopment guidelines, 937 

Shipyard Quarters Marina. 238, 277, 839-840, 
1146 
ship christening, 451 
ships at 

Beatty. USS (DD-756), 855 

Constitution. USS (IX-21) (aka Old Constitution; 
"Old Ironsides"), 934 

Crane Ship No 1 (AB-1) (aka Kearsarge. USS), 
148 

Gnswold, USS (DE-7 / BDE-7), 141 

Lancetfish, USS (SS-296), 138, 936, 1115 

Mason, USS (DE-529), 141, 936 

Myles C Fox. USS (DD-829), 936 

Thor. USS (ARC-4), 936 

torpedo boat, 74 

YPD-24 (YPD-24), 936, 1219 
in Shore Station Development Plan, 155 
streets & roadways, 1044 
World War II, 141 

9 [66] (ex-Wharf 6) 

archival materials, 1189 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1845-1847), 851, 1085 

extension (proposed, 1869), 851 

extension (1900), 1095 

replacement (1911-1912), 851-852 

extension (proposed, 1920s), 853 

reconstruction (1931), 106 

repairs (1931-1932), 853 

rehabilitation and lengthening (1941-1943), 122, 

853, 1112 
replacement (proposed, 1950s), 853, 855 
replacement (proposed, 1960s), 161 

demolition, 855-856, 1149 

demolition (proposed). 171-172, 839-840, 855 

deterioration, 184, 855-856 

floating cranes, 842 

floating derricks, 852, 1172 

HAER documentation, 855-856, 1189 

hammerhead cranes, 982 

hazardous materials remediation, 249 

mactivation, 1137 

location, 854, 1053 

at Navy Yard closure, 184 

pipeline, 859 

quay wall, 1045 

railroad tracks, 843, 852-853 

redevelopment, 205, 232, 851. 855-856, 1149 

ships at 

America, USS (aka Amerika) (Id. No. 3006), 852 

Compton, USS (DD-705), 855, 982 

escort ships, 148 

Fiske. USS (DD-842), 936 

Jonas Ingram. USS (DD-938), 855 

Macon. USS (CA-132), 162 

Miantonomoh, USS (monitor), 851 

Sabine. USS (sloop-of-war), 851 

William R Rush, USS (DD-714), 936 

KC-6.?5(YC-625), 853 

in Shore Station Development Plan, 155 

World War II. 146 
10 

archival materials, 1189 

construction, repair, and improvements, 106. 133- 
134. 851-855 

demolition, 856, 1149 

demolition (proposed). 839-840 

deterioration, 184, 855 

HAER documentation, 855-856, 1189 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Piers & Wharves 

1 — Continued 

hazardous materials remediation, 249 

mactivation, 1137 

Industrial Service Buildings, 853 

location, 104. 808, 854 

at Navy Yard closure, 184 

redevelopment, 205, 232, 238. 856. 1149 

ships at 

barges & service craft, 104 

Constitution. USS (IX-21) (aka Old Constitution; 

"Old Ironsides"), 133, 805, 853 
Grampus. USS (SS-523) (aka Rio Grande do Sul 

(S-11)), 143 
Grenadier. USS (SS-525) (aka P/cua(S-13)), 854 
LST-1154. USS (LST-1154 / AVB-2) (aka 

Tallahatchie County. USS), 146 
0-4. USS (SS-65), 852 
O-70,USS(SS-71). 852 
in Shore Station Development Plan, 155 
World War II, 143, 146 
10A, 853,938 
10B (see Pier 11) 

11 (ex-Pier 10B), 938-945 
appraisal photos. 1142-1143 
archival materials, 1189 
capacity, 24 

as Central Artery construction laydown space, 1154 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1941), 853, 938-939 
space created for by Navy Yard boundary 
expansion, 804 
extension (World War II), 122 
reconstruction to support aircraft carriers (1 950s), 
24, 155, 161, 940-942 
authorization for, 940. 1125 
buildings demolished for, 861 
contractor, 940 
cost, 941 

electrical substations, 569 
Industrial Service Building, 193, 635-636, 

942 
portal crane purchases, 942, 952, 954 
portal crane tracks, 942, 1125 
in progress photos. 162, 941-942 
size, 941 
HAER documentation, 1189 
hazardous materials remediation, 249 
illumination, 191 

Industrial Services Building, 193, 635-636 
location, 123, 805 
Marginal Wharf, 940 
oxygen distribution system, 867 
portal crane tracks, 162, 941, 952, 968, 1125 
portal cranes, 942, 954, 961, 964, 1134 
proposed (1908), 852 
recommendations for, 6, 391 

redevelopment, 857, 863, 944-945, 1053, 1149, 1226 
ship commissioning ceremonies, 862, 1200 
ships at 

Albany, USS (CA-123 / CG-10), 942 
Boston, USS (CAG-1), 866, 944 
Constellation. USS (IX-20), 906 
Crane Ship No. 7 (AB-1) (aka Kearsarge. USS), 

162, 940 
Essex, USS (CVS-9), 161 
Essex-class aircraft carriers, 943 
Gyatt. USS (DD-712 / DDG-712 / DDG-1), 162, 

941 
Lake Champlain. USS (CVS-39), 964 
Martha's Vineyard. SS, 771, 945, 1148 
Mount Vernon. USS (LSD-39), 944, 955 
Wabash, USS (AOR-5), 944 
Wadleigh. USS (DD-689), 162 
Wasp. USS (CVS-18), 936 
signage, 193 
sonar testing facility, 943 
12, 585, 940-941 
Angle Wharf (see Wharf 3) 
Battery and Ordnance Quay (see Ordnance Wharf) 
Cobb Wharf, 24. 29, 994, 1078-1079, 1084 
Finger Pier (see Pier 1 USS Constitution Pier) 
New Wharf, 29 
Ordnance Wharf [53] (aka Battery and Ordnance Quay), 

33, 658, 994. 995, 1052, 1087 
P-086 (Pier 8) (proposed), 157 
P-091 (Pier 3) (proposed), 157 
Pile Wharf [61] (see Wharf 2) 
Shear Wharf (see Wharf 2) 
Ship Repair Pier 3 (proposed), 913 
Stone Wharf. 1079 

Wharf 1, 574. 596. 740. 742, 896-897 
Wharf 2 (Pile Wharf / Shear Wharf) 

construction, repair, and improvements. 1085 1088 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Piers & Wharves 

Wharf 2 — Continued 
demolition, 899 
location in Navy Yard, 52. 56 
Pile Wharf [61], 29, 33, 897, 1080-1081 
railroad tracks, 970-971 
ships at 

Inca. USS (yacht), 63 
Rocket (tug), 578 

Tallapoosa. USS (sidewheel gunboat), 897 
Wabash. USS (steam frigate), 56 
Wachusett. USS (screw sloop), 1162 
on site plan (1860), 896 
Shears, 897, 1084, 1092 
wooden privies, 596 
Wharf 3 160] 

Angle Wharf [59], 908-909, 1085-1086 
construction, repair, and improvements, 908, 1081, 

1085-1086 
infill, 830 

location in Navy Yard, 62 
on master plan (1828), 33, 908-909 
ships at 

Amphitnte. USS (BM-2), 63 
Ohio. USS (ship-of-the-line). 58. 909, 995 
Wharf 4 [64] (see Pier 7 [64]) 
Wharf 5 [65] (see Pier 8 [65]) 
Wharf 6 [66] (see Pier 9 [66]) 
Portal Cranes (see Portal Cranes) 
Quarters. 45 

construction, 43 

Lower Quarters (see Building 266) 

numbering system. 429-430 

Officers Quarters (see Building 266) 

Porter's Quarters (see Quarters A) 

Upper Quarters (see Building 265) 

A 

Boundary Wall and, 272, 743, 812 
construction, repair, and improvements, 43, 102. 1079 
dating, 416n1 

demolition, 43, 45. 158, 1012. 1124 
as emergency plumbers quarters. 45 
fence enclosing yard. 102 
Gate House, 660 
Guard House, 65 
location, 45, 102 

as mail messengers quarters, 45 
Main Gate and, 661 
as porter's quarters, 45 
streets & roadways, 65 
Wall. 169, 416-417 
B-F (see Building 265) 
Captains Row (see Building 265) 
Chauffeur's Quarters (see Building 1) 
G (Commandant's House) 44, 422-427 
archival materials, 1189, 1192 
in art, 44, 1117 

Boundary Wall and, 24, 27. 220. 741. 743-746 
Building 21 (Carriage House), association with. 456- 

457 
Bunker Hill Day Parade, 27 
as character-defining feature, 373 
Constitution. USS. Bicentennial Salute, 1152 
construction, repair, and improvements 
plans (1804). 1078 

original construction (1805). 16, 43. 1078 
modifications (1825), 44 
reconstruction (1849). 43-44 
WPA projects. 44. 109. 117.424-425, 1106-1107 
NPS rehabilitation projects, 228. 230-231, 1155 
current status, 265 
dating, 422n1 
Driveway. 1050-1051 
fence replacement, 1107 

as First Naval District Commandant's quarters, 43 
furniture, 205 
gates, 816 

HABS documentation, 44. 383. 424, 741, 1189 
Historic Structure Report (HSR), 8, 394 
landscaping, 59, 1079 
location, 37, 50, 56-57 
on master plan (1828), 33 423 
National Register nomination. 197. 390 
at Navy Yard closure. 185 
outbuilding. 650 
in Preble History Gallery, 59 
primary entrance, 1050 
redevelopment (in BNHP) 

.is lunction space, 225-226. 254-255. 1150, 

1154-1155 
as museum, 246 

New England Museum Association, 225 
rehabilitation. 228, 230-231. 1155 
theme museum (proposed), 215 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



1272- 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Quarters 

G — Continued 

residents. 43, 663. 1099 
streets & roadways, 44 
sub-surface drawings, 1180 
underground tanks, 629, 631-632 
War of 1812, 19 
in winter, 1093 
H-K (see Marine Barracks (Building I)) 
L-0 (see Building 266) 
P, 438-439 

"Apple Orchard" party, 1178 

as Captain of the Yard quarters, 43 

as character-defining feature, 374 

construction, repair, and improvements, 43, 45, 439, 

1098-1099, 1149 
current status, 265 

as First Naval District Chief of Staff quarters, 43 
garages, 114 
inactivation, 1138 
location, 43, 624, 820 
at Navy Yard closure, 185 
redevelopment, 205n451, 246, 439, 1149 
tennis court, 643 

underground tanks, 629, 631-632 
Shipways 

as character-defining feature, 4, 372 
hammerhead cranes, 983 
redevelopment, 246, 1139 
1 , 980-985 

appraisal photos, 1141 
bridge across, 1053-1054 
construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1915), 81. 430, 844, 1052, 

1099 
modernization (1915), 1102 
improvements (1930s). 113, 134, 539, 804, 980, 

983, 1106 
improvements (1955), 153 
declared excess, 1131 
HAER documentation, 211 
Hammerhead Cranes. 189, 927, 982 
location, 538. 1053 
Marine Railway and, 769 
National Register nomination photos, 387-388 
Navy Yard Sesquicentennial, 148 
redevelopment (in New Development Area) 
allowable use, 205 
Boston HarborWalk, 1052 
BRA and, 232, 1146 
conversion to parking, 1134 
demolition (partial), 380 
development guidelines, 985 
Immobiliare New England, conveyance to, 1146 
Navy Yard Really Trust, purchase by, 1147 
Shipways Place Condominium. 242 
as replacement for Building 68 (West Shiphouse), 

23. 543 
shipbuilding. 139-140, 154, 1103, 1158 
2 986-989 

appraisal photos, 1141 

bridge across. 1053-1054 

as character-defining feature, 375 

construction, repair, and improvements 

original construction (1940-1941), 137, 804 
Building 104 demolition (partial). 134, 544- 

545, 633, 1108 
Pier 7 demolition, 134, 851. 921. 931, 1108 
Pier 8, impact on, 935-936 
location relative to Shipways 1, 804 
current status, 273 
HAER documentation, 211, 988 
hammerhead cranes, 982-983 
inactivation, 1138 
location, 847, 1003, 1053 
National Register nomination photos, 385 
at Navy Yard closure, 184, 193 
Navy Yard Sesquicentennial, 148 
as parking for Navy Yard employees, 634, 847 
as parking lot, 148 

redevelopment (in New Development Area) 
allowable use, 205 
Boston HarborWalk, 937. 1052 
BRA and. 232, 1146 
demolition (partial), 380 
development guidelines, 989 
Immobiliare New England, conveyance to, 841. 

1146 
Navy Yard Realty Trust, purchase by, 1147 
parking garage, 545, 985, 1134 
as residential condominiums, 242. 841. 985 
ship christenings, 1109-1111 
ship launches, 1167 
streets & roadways, 1003 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Shipways 

2 — Continued 

World War II shipbuilding, 140 

3 (see Dry Dock 5) 
Shops 

administrative organization, 1221 

directory of senior supervisors, 1221 

Anchor Shop, 506 (see also Building 40) 

Angle Shop, 94 (see also Building 40) 

Assembly & Shipfitters Shop, 507 (see also Building 40) 

Assembly & Welding Shop, 132. 612 (see also Building 

195) 
Automotive Shop. 192 (see also Building 204) 
Blacksmith Shop (aka Smith Shop / Smiths Shop). 29, 

511, 581, 598, 1078-1079 (see also Building 6; 

Building 18; Building 25; Building 42; Building 42- 

D; Building 105) 
Block Shop (aka Blockmakers Shop), 60. 98 (see also 

Building 22; Building 36) 
Blockmakers Shop (see Block Shop) 
Boat Shop, 33, 137. 585-586, 622, 638, 916 (see also 

Building 77, Building 79; Building 114) 
Boiler Shop, 189, 511, 555-556. 1099 (see also Building 

42; Building 42-D; Building 42-E; Building 106) 
Building Trades Shop, 118, 559, 1106 (see also Building 

107; Public Works Shop) 
Cabinet Shop, 98 (see also Building 36) 
Carpenters & Joiners Shop (see Building 24) 
Carpenters Shop, 56, 60, 463, 1078, 1085 (see also 

Building 8; Building 18; Building 24; Building 59) 
Carpenters Work Shop, 462 
Central Tool & Temporary Service Shop (Shop 06-99). 

507 (see also Building 40) 
Central Tool Shop, 514 (see also Building 42) 
Chain & Forge Shop, 105, 107 (see also Building 6; Build- 
ing 40; Building 42; Building 105) 
archival materials, 1176 
as character-defining feature, 4, 372, 374 
employees, 1137 
Headhouse, 81 
modernization, 153 
Chain Shop (see Building 105; Chain & Forge Shop) 
Copper Shop, 511, 555 (see also Building 42; Building 

42-D; Building 42-F; Building 43; Building 44; Build- 
ing 106; Plumbers, Tin & Copper Shops) 
Coppersmiths Shop, 60 (see also Building 44) 
Die Sinkers Shop, 189, 556 (see also Building 106) 
Electrical & Electronics Shop, 158 (see also Building 197) 
Electrical & Outside Machinists Shop. 132 (see also 

Building 197) 
Electrical Shop. 539. 614-615 (see also Building 103; 

Building 197) 
Electronics Paint Shop. 186 (see also Building 198) 
Electronics Shop. 615 (see also Building 197) 
Engine Repair Shop, 62 (see also Building 45) 
Engineers Shop, 557 

Equipment Shops, 80 (see also Building 40) 
Forge & Chain Shop (see Chain & Forge Shop) 
Forge Shop (see Chain & Forge Shop) 
Forklift Repair Shop (aka Forklift Maintenance Shop). 494, 

535 (see also Building 38; Building 96) 
Galvanizing & Electro-Plating Shop (aka Galvanizing 

Shop), 60, 462-463, 555 (see also Building 24; 

Building 106) 
Garage & Maintenance Shop (aka Garage Repair Shop), 

118. 122, 1106(seea/soBuildtng38; Building 204) 
Garage Repair Shop (see Garage & Maintenance Shop 

(aka Garage Repair Shop)) 
Grindstone Shop, 459 (see also Building 22) 
Ground Equipment Shop, 650-651 (see also Building 

245) 
Inside Machine Shop, 1109 (see also Building 42) 
Instrumentation Calibration Shop, 466-469 (see also 

Building 28) 
Iron Platers Shop, 547-548. 1092 (see also Building 16; 

Building 66) 
Joiners & Carpenters Shop (see Building 24; Carpenters 

Shop; Joiners Shop) 
Joiners Shop. 462, 1085. 1183, 1188, 1210 (see also 

Building 24; Building 33; Building 36; Building 114) 
Light Shop, 614 (see also Building 197) 
Machine & Erecting Shop, 511 (see also Building 42A) 
Machine Shop, 24, 60, 511, 1187. 1210 (see a/so Build- 

,ng 22; Building 42; Building 42A; Building 42B) 
Machine Shop No 1, 510 (see also Building 42; Building 

42-A) 
Machine Shop No 2 "Crystal Palace," 510 (see also 

Building 42; Building 42-B) 
Mast Shop, 582 (see also Building 85; Building M) 
Metalworkers Shop, 555 (see also Building 106) 
Millwrights Shop, 76(seea/soBuilding 101, Building 113) 
Missile Systems Shop, 155, 157 (see also Building P- 

084) 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Shops — Continued 

Mold (Mould) Loft, 622, 1214 (see also Building 36; Build- 
ing 40; Building 77) 
Oakum Loft. 38 (see also Building 10) 
Optical Shop, 616 (see also Building 197) 
Ordnance & Pipe Covering Shop, 117 (see also Building 

196) 
Ordnance Shop, 155 (see also Building 39; Building 42) 
Outside Machinists Shop, 130, 155, 614 (see also Build 

ing 42; Building 197) 
Paint Shop (aka Painters Loft), 488. 600, 916 (see also 
Building 5, Building 10; Building 36, Building 125; 
Building 125 (Paint Shop); Building 127; Building 
195; Building 219; Building 279) 
Pattern Shop, 511, 547 (see also Building 42: Building 
42-E; Building 66) 
archival materials, 1176 
Pipe & Assembly Shop, 191 (see also Building 195) 
Pipe Shop. 511. 539, 612 (see also Building 42; Building 
42-F; Building 43; Building 103; Building 118, Build- 
ing 195) 
Plumbers, Tin & Copper Shops (aka Plumbers Shop / 
Plumbers & Tinners Shop / Tinners Shop), 60, 62, 
447, 1055, 1089 (see also Building 23; Building 
25; Building 28; Building 33; Copper Shop) 
Plumbing & Pipefitting Shop, 555 (see also Building 106) 
Power Plant (Shop 03), 571 (see also Building 108) 
Print Shop (Shop 93), 467-468 (see also Building 28) 
Public Works Shop, 94, 100, 560, 1041 (see also Build- 
ing 22; Building 107; Building 200) 
Radiac Shop, 616 (see also Building 197) 
Repair Shop, 510 (see also Building 42; Building 45) 
Riggers & Laborers Shop, 462-465 (see also Building 

24) 
Riggers Shop (aka Riggers Loft / Rigging Loft / Rigging 
Shop), 459, 462. 581 (see also Building 22; Build- 
ing 24; Building 110) 
Rolling Mill & Heavy Hammer Shop. 506 (see also Build- 
ing 40) 
Roofing Shop, 479 (see also Building 33) 
Sail Loft, 63. 1218 (see also Building 24. Building 33) 
Sheet Metal Shop, 155, 501, 539 (see also Building 103) 
Ship Repair Shop, 458-461 (see also Building 22) 
Shipfitters Shop, 547 (see also Building 66, Building 104) 
Shipsmiths Shop, 71 (see also Building 105) 
Shipwrights Shop, 98 (see also Building 36) 
Sign Shop, 600-601, 655 (see also Building 125) 
Smith Shop (see Blacksmith Shop) 
Smiths Shop (see Blacksmith Shop) 
Spar Shop, 585 (see also Building 75; Building 85, Build- 
ing 114) 
Structural Shop, 107, 155, 1126. 1195 (see also Building 

103: Building 104; Building 104A; Building 195) 
Temporary Services Shop. 187 (see also Building 40) 
Testing Shop, 85 (see also Building 42-F; Building 43; 

Building 119) 
Timber Bending Shop, 56 (see also Building 66) 
Tinners, Plumbers, and Coppersmiths Shop (see Plumb- 
ers, Tin & Copper Shops) 
Tinners Shop (see Plumbers, Tin & Copper Shops) 
Tool Shop, 511 (see also Building 42-E) 
Transducer Repair Shop, 163 (see also Building 10) 
Transportation Shop, 122 (see also Building 204) 
Upholstery Shop. 98 (see also Building 33, Building 36) 
Woodworking & Boat Shop, 193, 217 
Woodworking Shop, 155, 585, 1099 (see also Building 

24; Building 114) 
Yards & Docks Shop, 557 (see also Building 107) 
Yards & Docks Woodworking & Machine Shop, 609 (see 
also Building 54) 
Streets & Roadways, 1000-1002 
BRA easements, 1146 
BRArepavng and reconstruction, 1000, 1008, 1037, 1145 

(see also under specific Streets & Roadways) 
crosswalks, 1035 
designations and numbering system, 1000-1001, 1029, 

1096 
footage. 1098 

paving materials, 229. 1000. 1002 
preservation guidelines, 248n678 
1st St., 158. 825. 1000. 1026-1027, 1058-1059, 1125 

(see also USS Constitution Parking Area) 
2nd St., 45, 158, 421, 746. 813. 1012 
3rd St , 1029-1030 

Aboveground Steam Line, 163 
as character-defining feature, 373 
demolition of elevated walkway. 1151 
paving, 71. 1027. 1029-1030 
railroad tracks, 976- 977 
recommendations lor. 392 
restricted access to. 1030 
Underground Pipe Conduit. 669. 672 
WPA projects. 1029-1030 
4th St. 203, 618, 1000 1031 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



- 1273 - 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Streets & Roadways — Continued 
5th St., 469, 1032 

BRA right-of-way, 1032 

construction, repair, and improvements, 18, 464, 469, 

819, 1014, 1033 
easements, 1146 
entrance security, 262 
Gate 4 road project 

building demolition, 819, 1008 

construction, 819 

easements, 1144 

First Ave., impact on, 1008 

Navy Yard, impact on, 214, 628, 1044 

purpose of, 812 

Section 106 agreement (1979). 245 
gate installation, 1014 
naming of, 469, 1000 
Navy Yard access, 219, 221, 1145 
as public street, 1032, 1146 
redevelopment, 238n610 
Underground Pipe Conduit, 670, 672 
as USS Constitution Museum Courtyard, 1150 
in winter, 1094 
6th St., 1034-1035 

BRA reconstruction of, 1034-1035 
Chelsea-Waters Streets Connector and, 219 
parades, 976 
paving, 1034-1035, 1098 
plan (1983), 1034 
as public street, 1034-1035, 1146 
railroad tracks, 975, 1034 
redevelopment, 232, 1025, 1034-1035 
as Terry Ring Way, 1035 
7th St., 1036-1037 

appraisal photos, 1140 
BRA reconstruction of, 1037 
manhole fire, 486, 503 
paving, 559, 1036-1037 
plan (1983), 1036 
as public street, 1036-1037, 1146 
railroad tracks, 1018, 1036-1037 
sidewalk, 1036 

Underground Pipe Conduit, 669-670 
8th St., 1038-1039 

BRA reconstruction of, 1039 
paving, 1038-1039 
plan (1983), 1038 
as public street, 1038-1039, 1146 
railroad tracks, 1038-1039 
Underground Pipe Conduit, 670 
9th St., 1040-1041 

along Building 42 (1920), 512 
BRA reconstruction of, 1041 
drains, 1041 

in Historic Monument Area, 1041 
Navy Yard access, 217-218 
in New Development Area, 1041 
paving, 1040-1041 
plan (1983). 1040 
as public street, 1040-1041, 1146 
railroad tracks, 972, 974, 1040-1041, 1098 
redevelopment, 1041 

Underground Pipe Conduit, 669-671, 672n1 
10th St., 985 
11th St., 542 
13th St., 1042-1044 

BRA reconstruction of, 1043-1044 

construction, repair, and improvements, 28, 100, 545, 

820, 849, 1042-1044 
conveyor bridge across, 526-527 
current status, 271 

fence, 821 

Navy Yard access, 215, 222 

paving, 100, 1042 

pedestrian bridges, 624 

as public street, 1044, 1154 

renaming, 820 

Underground Pipe Conduit, 669-670 

WPA projects. 1043 
14th St., 748. 750-751, 820, 1022, 1052 
15th St., 751 
16th St., 1045-1046 

Boundary Wall and, 749, 751 

BRA reconstruction of. 1046 

BRA removal of railroad tracks, 1046 

extension, 222, 588, 822 

paving, 1045-1046 

as public street, 1046, 1154 

railroad tracks. 1045-1046 
18th St., 193, 865 
I ii,t Ave. (Avenue E), 1003-1009 

appraisal photos, 1140 

in Boston Naval Shipyard News, 1115 

BRA guard shack, 1032 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Streets & Roadways 

First Ave (Avenue E) — Continued 
as character-defining feature, 373 
Chelsea St. connection, 222 
construction, repair, and improvements 

paving, 71, 158, 547. 1007-1008 

realignment, 454 

reconstruction (1902-1903), 1004 

relocation, 1005, 1031 

widening, 80, 811, 990, 1006-1007 
current status, 273 
fuel pipeline, 859 
Gatel, 810 
Gate House, 661 
landscaping, 553 
Marine guard, 21 
Navy Yard access, 215, 219, 221, 826, 1000, 1011, 

1032 
parades, 1005-1006 
parking, 164, 224 
as public street, 1146, 1154 
railroad tracks 

1870s, 970 

during 1902 street paving, 972 

Building 40 turnouts, 976 

connections with other tracks. 975, 1027 

construction, repair, and improvements, 164, 455, 
974, 1007, 1046 

route of, 1004, 1006, 1026 

for Track Scale, 977 
recommendations for, 6, 391-392 
redevelopment, 236, 862 
Scale House, 639 
security, 262, 264, 678 
sidewalks, 618 
on site plan (1877), 1029 
street signs, 503 
tour bus parking, 224 
Truck Scale 235, 186 

Underground Pipe Conduit, 71, 669-672, 672n1, 990 
Second Ave. (Avenue D / Main Ave), 1010-1015 
appraisal photos, 1140 
board fence, 991 
Boundary Wall and, 743 
Building 105 and, 553 
as character-defining feature, 373 
construction, repair, and improvements 

extension, 860 

landscaping, 530, 756, 1079 

narrowing with construction of Chain Forge ex- 
tension, 606 

paving, 529, 1011, 1031, 1057, 1097 

pedestnanization, 485, 499, 1000 

widening, 814, 993, 1013 
funerals, 1099 
location, 1003 

Marine Barracks Parade Ground and. 828 
on master plan (1828), 31, 33, 373, 485, 810, 813, 

1000, 1003, 1010-1011 
National Register nomination photos, 385-387 
Navy Yard access, 215 
overhead steam line, 170 
parades, 1012 

railroad tracks, 975, 1012, 1014 
recommendations for, 6, 391 
redevelopment, 243, 1011, 1014-1015 
restricted access to, 1030 
Third Ave. (Avenue C), 1016-1018 
appraisal photos, 1142 
construction, repair, and improvements 

layout, 1036 

modifications, 85, 530 

paving, 559, 1016, 1098 

restoration, 480 
National Register nomination photos, 388 
railroad tracks, 972, 1016, 1018, 1098 
redevelopment (in Historic Monument Area) 

BRA and, 1017-1018 

historic streetscape, preservation of, 244 

as public street, 1016, 1146, 1154 

utility construction, 240 
as storage area, 602, 1016, 1018 
Underground Pipe Conduit, 669-670 
Fourth Ave. (Avenue B), 865, 974, 1019-1020, 1022, 1154 
Fifth Ave. (Avenue A), 1022-1024 
13th St. intersection, 820 
16th St. connection. 822 
abandonment, 1020 
Boundary Wall and, 748, 750-751 
landscape treatment, 527 
planking, 1021 
as public street, 1024. 1154 
street grid, departure from, 1019 
Underground Pipe Conduit, 670 



Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
Streets & Roadways — Continued 

Baxter Rd .. 221, 469, 782, 1047-1048, 1149 
Building 1-269 Driveway. 1049 
Commandant's House Driveway, 1000, 1050-1051 
Dock St., 1052-1054 

construction, repair, and improvements. 842, 976. 

1052, 1131 
crane rails, 959 
location, 847, 1000 
paving, 976, 1052, 1131 
portal crane tracks, 922, 932, 968 
portal cranes, 956 
railroad tracks. 976 

redevelopment (in New Development Area) 
Boston HarborWalk, 392 
BRA and, 260, 1053-1054 
pedestrian easements, 260 
Dry Dock 1 & 2 Connector, 1055 
Flagship Ave . 1025 
Lincoln Ave, 1026-1027 
location, 1000 
naming of, 1000 
paving, 1027, 1058, 1096 
railroad tracks, 972, 975, 1004, 1026 
Marine Barracks Driveway, 1000 
Marine Barracks Loop, 228, 828-829, 1056, 1056-1057 
McKinley Ave. (Avenue G), 513, 1000, 1028 
Service drives, 1000 

USS Constitution Parking Area. 1058-1059, 1059 (see 
also 1 st St.) 
Charlestown Neighborhood Council, 248 
"Charlie Ryan " See Portal Cranes - 90 
Charlottestown, HMCS (FFH-339), 257 
Charlton, Charles H., 1099 
Charlton, Cornelius H.. 1197 
Charlton, USNS (T-AKR-314), 966, 1197 
Charrette, Nadeja Pronita (Mrs. George), 140 
Charrette, USS (DD-581) (aka Velos (D-16)), 140, 1109, 1160 

1174 
Chase, Larry, 1126 
Chatham, HMS (F-87), 257, 682-683 
Chauncey, Isaac, 31n69 
Chegodega (YTM-542). 792, 1219 
Chelsea (Mass.) 

Admiral's Hill, 380, 1082 
aerial photo (1941), 278 

Mary O'Malley Park (aka Chelsea Naval Hospital Park), 1083 
Chelsea Annex 

acquisition of, 93n223, 123, 125. 1109 
activation, 1112 
aerial photos, 125. 278 
disposal of. 125, 146, 1116 
Facilities 

crawler cranes, 124 
finger piers, 124, 128 

Marine Railway 12. 93n223, 123-125, 1109 
Marine Railway 13, 93n223, 123-125, 1109 
rehabilitation and construction, 1112 
ship repair facilities, 128 
Chelsea Creek (aka Chelsea River), 125, 1082 
Chelsea Naval Hospital (aka Naval Hospital, Boston), 1082-1083 
administration, 93, 1082, 1215 
aerial photos, 278, 1083 
Alexander Parris and, 37n84. 761, 1081 
archival materials, 1190 
closure, 1082, 1137 

construction, 37n84, 761, 1081-1082, 1084 
Facilities 

Building 1 (Naval Hospital), 1082-1083 

Building 2 (Naval Magazine), 1082-1084, 1097-1098, 

1100 
Building 3 (Quarters), 1083 
Building 4 (Radio Station), 103 
Building 22 (Naval Hospital), 1082-1083 
Building 59 (Marine Hospital), 1082-1083 
corpsmen's quarters, 619, 1082 
Pier 2, 1082 

Ropewalk relocation (proposed), 45, 52. 518, 1089 
land acquisition, 1080 
legislative jurisdiction, 1139 
location, 18n32, 1082 
National Register designation, 1082, 1137 
redevelopment, 380, 1082-1083 
site plan (1918). 1082 
World War II. 20, 124, 278 
Chelsea Naval Hospital Park. See Chelsea (Mass.) - Mary 

O'Malley Park 
Chelsea Naval Magazine. See Naval Magazine, Chelsea 
Chelsea River. See Chelsea Creek 

Chelsea Street Garage. See Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - 
Numbered Buildings & Structures - 204 



Pages 1-394 = Volume! 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1 244 = Volume 3 



1274- 



Index 



Chelsea-Water Streets Connector 
construction 

completion, 221, 1008, 1146 
easements, 219, 1144, 1146 
offices, 225. 441 
design 

legal compliance, 218, 628 
maps of proposed scheme, 217 
impact on Navy Yard 

Boundary Wall relocation, 218, 220, 427, 744, 758-759. 

1145 
Building 1 demolition (proposed), 218 
Building 1 use as construction site offices, 225 
Building 107 title transfer, 224, 628 
Building 204 demolition, 218, 628, 819 
Building 245 relocation, 218, 650-651, 757 
Building 269 demolition (proposed), 218 
Commandant's House Driveway, 1051 
Gate 1 closure, 812, 819 
Gate 2 redesign, 814 
management zoning map, 214 
Navy Yard reuse options, 232 
Little Mystic Channel Bridge, 748-749 
mitigation measures, 223-224, 628 
reconnection of Chelsea St. sections, 676, 744 
Chesapeake. USS (frigate). 22 
Chesapeake, USS (training vessel) (aka Severn. USS), 1160, 

1160n4 
Chesapeake Bay, 29 

Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, 1188 
Chester, USS (CL-1), 451 
Chicago. USS (CA-14), 658 
Chickering, E„ 576 
Chickenng, WE, 38 

Chicopee (YTM-747) (aka LT-1966, USAV), 578 
Children's Art Center. 1129 
The Children's Quarter, 238n617, 491 
Childs Bertman Tseckares & Casendino (CBT). See Childs 

Bertman Tseckares (CBT) 
Childs Bertman Tseckares (CBT) (formerly Child Bertman 
Tseckares & Casendino) 
Anchor Building, 245, 572 
Residences at Pier 5, 925 
Shipways Condominium, 841, 985 
Shipyard Quarters Marina, 840, 937 
Childs Engineering Corp.. 640, 834 
Chin, WahG., 314 

China, vessels transferred to. 1169-1171, 1174 
Chorba, John, 154 
Chrisler, Robert P., 862 

Christ Church, Boston. See Boston (Mass.) - Old North Church 
christening of ships. See under ships and other vessels 
Chnstensen, Frank B. "Barney," 1116 
Christian Science Monitor 1124 

Chung Chuan (LST-22-\) See LST- 1030. USS (LST-1030) 
Chung Hsun (LST-208). See LST-993, USS (LST-993) 
Chung Sheng (LS7-2V\). See LST- 1033, USS (LST-1033/LST(H)- 

1033) 
CID Associates, 881-882 

Cincinnati. SS (aka Covington. USS (Id. No. 1409)), 83, 996 
Circeo, Alan, 888 
Circeo, Virginia, 888 

City Point. See under South Boston (Mass.) 
City Trust Safe Deposit & Surety Co.. 780 
Civil Aeronautics Administration, 567 
Civil War 

archival materials, 1179 

Fort Fisher Campaign (1865), 50 

Fort Sumter, Attack on (1861), 1087 

Hampton Roads, Battle of (1862), 48, 1087, 1091, 1121 

Lee's surrender, 1088 

Mobile Bay. Battle of (1864). 48. 980. 1121 

Navy, U.S. 

blockade of the South. 11, 430, 1085, 1087-1088, 1123 
expansion, 11-12, 12n11. 15, 763, 1087 
Housatomc. USS, sinking of, 1161 
shipbuilding, 11-12. 50, 980-981. 1086-1087, 1205 
significant ships, 49, 980, 1121 (see also Hartford. USS 
(IX-13); Merrimack. USS (screw frigate); Virginia. 
CSS (ironclad)) 
strategy. 50 
training ships, 1088 
vessel acquisition, 578, 1183 
Navy Yard. 50-52 

improvements, 37-38, 40-41 

Building 4 acquisition, 441, 447 
Building 31 addition, 472 
Building 39 construction, 496 
"Crystal Palace," 515 
Marine Barracks repairs, 18 



Civil War 

Navy Yard 

improvements - Continued 
new buildings, 62, 98, 114 
Ordnance Wharf buildings, 994 
Water Closet construction, 596 
officers connected to, 20, 59, 420, 430, 1086-1087, 1095 
shipbuilding, 49-50, 52 

double-end gunboats, 1087 
facilities, 842 
Hartford. USS, 980, 1121 
Merrimack. USS, 980, 1121 
Pompanoosuc. USS, 541 
Quinsigamond, USS, 981 
in Shiphouse H, 981 
Shipways 2, 986 
as period of significance. 3, 366, 368 
YMCA service. 608 
Claudius, Rod, 1080 
Cleghorn Co., 867 
Cleverius, Watt Tyler, 991 
Ctoues, USS (DE-265), 1112, 1160 
CM Leach (firm), 463, 475, 764, 972, 1098 
CoalBargeNo. 90 (YC-90), 82, 1097, 1173 
Coal Barge No. 91 (YC-91). 1097, 1173 
CoalBargeNo. a?(YC-92), 1097, 1173 
CoalBargeNo. 93(YC-93), 1097, 1173 
CoalBargeNo 94 (YC-94), 1097, 1173 
CoalBargeNo. 95(YC-95). 1097, 1173 
CoalBargeNo. 96 (YC-96 /YD-20), 1097, 1173 
CoalBargeNo 97(YC-97), 1097, 1173 
CoalBargeNo 98 (YC-98), 1097, 1173 
CoalBargeNo. 99 (YC-99), 1097, 1173 
CoalBargeNo. 700(YC-100), 1097, 1173 
CoalBargeNo. 101 (YC-101), 1097, 1173 
CoalBargeNo. 7O?(YC-102), 1097, 1173 
CoalBargeNo. 70.3 (YC-103). 1097, 1173 
CoalBargeNo. 7O4(YC-104). 1097, 1173 
CoalBargeNo. 705(YC-1O5), 1097, 1173 
CoalBargeNo Z?7(YC-227 / YPD-20), 1098, 1173 
CoalBargeNo 228 (YC-228), 1098, 1173 
Coal Barge No. Z?9(YC-229), 1098, 1173 
Coal Barge No. 230(YC-230). 1098, 1173 
CoalBargeNo. 288 (YC-288), 539, 1099, 1172-1173 
CoalBargeNo. 289(YC-289), 1099, 1173 
coal barges (YC) See under service craft 
Coast Guard, U.S. 

Boston Lifeboat Station. 300 
Pier 2 pollution notice. 910, 1147 
Prohibition enforcement, 93, 576 
publicity film, 296n43 

safety (exclusion) zones, 276, 276n769, 683, 1149 
seal. 668 

Section Base 6, 92-93 

South Boston Annex and, 306, 332-333, 1137 
Support Center relocation (proposed), 306, 800 
vessels (see also specific ships by name) 
icebreakers, 1207 
lightships, 261, 786, 914, 1212 
marine railway dockings, 86, 93, 784, 831 
patrol craft, 913 
ship designations, 1203 
vessel conversions, 124, 134, 144-145, 300 
vessels transferred to, 139, 1163-1164, 1196-1197, 1207 
World War II facilities, 14 
Coast Survey, U.S., vessels transferred to, 1159 
Coastal Cement Corp., 344, 356, 892, 894-895, 1146-1147 
Coatopa (YTB-392), 793 
Coburn, F.G., 506. 539, 1028, 1096 
Cochitua'e Reservoir, 1088 
Cochituate Waterworks, 41 
Coffman. DeWitt, 451, 1099 
Cohasset (Mass.), 1100 

Cohasset Annex. See Cohasset Naval Magazine 
Cohasset Army Ammunition Activity. 1100 
Cohasset Naval Magazine (aka Cohasset Annex), 1100 
Cohasset Nike Site (BO-38), 1101 
Cold War era 
end of, 15 

in historic resource studies, 3, 363, 366-369, 372, 376 
Navy, U.S.. 13. 150, 251, 367, 367n20 [see also Cassin Young. 
USS(DD-793)) 
Cole, USS (DDG-67), Attack on (2000). 1151 
Coleman Bros . 512, 669. 767, 1011 
Colleton. USS (APB 36 / APL-36), 137n291, 149, 1115, 1160. 

1160n5 
Collins, Frank. 1126 
Color for Naval Shore Facilities (U.S. Navy manual), 7, 393 



Colorado. USS (steam frigate). 763, 1089 

Colors (flag raising and lowering), 648-649. 753. 911 

Columbia Equipment Co., 676 

Columbian Exposition, 1091 

Columbo (trawler) (aka YP-432, USS), 144 

Columbus. USS (ship-of-the-line). 34, 55 

Columbus Quincentenary, 325, 1149 

Comanche. USS (tug). See Sagamore. USS (tug) 

Comber, USS (SS-527), 1115, 1160 

Comfort. USNS (T-AH-20), 1156 

Commerce Dept, U.S., 318, 339, 894 

See also Economic Development Administration (EDA) 
Commercial Lobster Co , 343, 354, 727, 887, 889 
Commission on Navy Yards, 1091 
Committee on Terminal Port Facilities, 316 
Committee to Retain the Boston Naval Shipyard, 1128 
Commodore Isaac Hull Memorial Inc.. 1138 
Commonwealth Pier (Pier 5). See under South Boston (Mass.) 
Commonwealth Pier No. 1 See under East Boston (Mass.) 
Commonwealth Railroad Yard. 978 
Compton. USS (DD-705), 303, 855, 982 
Computer Applications Support & Development Office (CASDO), 

499, 503 
Condon Co., 602 

Confederate States of America. See also Civil War. Virginia, CSS 
(ironclad) 
commerce raiders. 52 
Hampton Roads, Battle of (1862), 48 
Mobile Bay, Battle of (1864), 48 

naval blockade against, 11, 430, 1085, 1087-1088, 1123 
submarines, 50, 1161 
takeover of U.S. navy yards, 12, 1087 
vessels salvaged by, 49, 1087 
vessels transferred to, 11 74 
Confiance, USS (screw sloop), 1088, 1160 
Congress, U.S. See also Defense Appropriations Acts; House Na- 
val Affairs Committee; House of Representatives. U.S.; Lend- 
Lease Act; National Parks and Recreation Act (1978); Naval 
Appropriations Acts; Senate. US 
Boston Army Base legislation, 317-318, 1124 
Boston National Historical Park legislation, 199, 203, 522, 

552, 769, 1137 
Charlestown Navy Yard legislation 
administrative offices. 475 
Building 38 (Cooperage) funding. 492 
Building 42 (Smithery) funding, 508 
Building 58 (Ropewalk), 43, 48, 107, 153, 516 
Building 79 (Ropewalk Coal House / Wire Rope Mil!) fund 

ing, 531-532 
Building 95 (Electric Light Station), 562 
Building 105 (Chain Forge), 107, 153 
Building 108 (Power Plant) improvements, authorization 

for, 1124 
Building 197 (Electronics and Electrical Shop) expansion 

authorization. 615, 1124 
Building 265 (Quarters B-F), 418 
building repair funds (1871), 472 
Constitution. USS, permanent home for. 196 
Dry Dock 2 authorization, 594 
expansion, proposed (1940), 24 
Fitchburg Slip reconstruction authorization (1899), 68, 

574 
Harris lawsuit, 1084 
land sales and purchases. 741, 1078 
Marine Barracks funding, 12, 19, 429-430 
Mystic/Tobin Bridge legislation, 626. 1124 
pier replacement, 1125 

public works budgets submitted to Congress, omissions 
from, 552, 602 
Chelsea Naval Hospital and Magazine funding, 1082-1083 
declaration of war on Mexico (1846), 1085 
declaration of war on Spain (1898), 1095 
Defense Dept. 

DERP-FUDS, 248 

study of Cold War resources. 366-367 
Florida navy yard authorization. 1080 
Memphis Navy Yard authorization, 11, 43n137 
National Park Service legislation, 177, 226, 1204 
Navy, US 

advancement of retired captains, 420 
expansion (1816), 48 
expansion (1939), 120 
navy yards 

Civil Engineer position. 1199 

consolidation of power plants in navy yards under Yards 

& Docks, 536, 549 
dry dock study and authorization. 34. 595. 760. 1080- 

1081 
master plan development directive. 11. 1081 
Navy Dept. report on conditions (1823), 30-31 
review ol (1827), 31 
review of (1882), 178 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1 244 = Volume 3 



1275 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Congress, U.S. 

navy yards — Continued 

ropewalks, 516 
New York Naval Shipyard legislation. 471, 1107 
Port Chicago Naval Magazine National Memorial, establish- 
ment of, 1101 
President's annual message to, 31n70, 43n137 
shipbuilding and repair, legislation concerning 
auxiliary ships, 82 
battle cruisers, 172 
bicoastal, 12 

Constitution, USS, 172. 172n360, 196, 1105 
by government yards, 12, 63 
historic vessels, transfer to private organizations, 175- 

176 
by private contractors, 12 
ship-of-the-line, 9, 15, 22 
steel warships, 12, 178 
wooden vessel repair, limits on, 12, 48 
South Boston Annex 

Barracks complex authorization, 297, 1106 
development as shipyard, authorization for, 696 
Dry Dock 3 legislation, 93, 280-281, 283. 1104, 1107 
"E" Street Annex, 307, 1128 
Marine Barracks, 283 
YMCA, authorization of, on military bases, 608 
Congress, USS (frigate), 22 

Congress Group, 236, 245, 606-607, 623-624, 1145-1146 
Congressional Medal of Honor recipients, 82, 251, 324, 1166, 1197 
Conley Container Terminal. See Castle Island Terminal 
Connecticut, USS (screw sloop) (aka Pompanoosuc, USS), 62, 
541, 1160 

See also Pompanoosuc, USS 
Connelly, Mary, 147, 1116 
Connerton, James, 1213 

Connor, USS (DD-582) (aka Aspis (D-06)), 1109, 1160, 1174 
Connors Brothers, 45, 439, 510, 598, 1096-1097 
Conroy, Terence W„ 437, 439, 481, 534, 537 
Conroy Development, 247 
Conroy-Heafitz Development Team, 437, 1146 
Consort. USS (brig), 1084, 1160 
Conspire (exhibit), 688 
Constellation, USS (IX-20) 

association with Navy Yard, 175 
decommissioning, 175 
in Dry Dock 1, 175, 763 
in Dry Dock 4 (South Boston). 175 
at Fitchburg Slip, 159 
frigate/sloop-of-war confusion, 176n366 
Pier 1 berth, 147, 159, 175, 682, 902, 906, 1180 
Pier 11 berth, 906 

transferred to private organization for restoration, ' 75-1 76, 
176n366 
Constellation Wharf Condominium 
design and construction, 242, 932 
master deed, 933, 1147 

public access to waterfront, 242, 260, 275, 933 
public observation area, 933 
residential units, 247, 277 
site plan, 933 
Constitution. USS (IX-21) (aka Old Constitution; "Old Ironsides") 
"America's Ship of State" designation, 1157 
anchor, 1193 

archival materials, 1187-1188, 1190 
mart, 1117, 1119, 1201 
battles, 1119, 1122, 1161 

Bicentennial Salute, 177, 253, 904, 1150, 1152-1153 
as BNHP component, 198, 903, 1138 
Boston (Mass.), permanent berthing in, 196, 1124 
cannon, 183, 449, 753, 993 
ceremonies, 254 

Charlestown Navy Yard associations, xii, 3, 172-177 
christening, 1117 

commanding officers, 225. 246, 421, 1078-1079, 1118, 1152 
construction supervisor, 1078 
cost, ready for sea, 1117 
crew members 

events, 182, 1152 
memorials, 1151 
parking, 217, 221n515, 1059 

quarters, 185, 198-199, 202, 246, 448-449 (see also 
Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - Numbered 
Buildings & Structures - 5) 
decommissioning, 1106 
existing conditions. 275 
figurehead, 1122 
at Fitchburg Slip, 159 
gun salute, 664-665 
historical plaque, 170. 197 
HMS Pinafore production, 1151 
launch, 1077, 1117 

Maintenance & Repair group (see USS Constitution Mainte- 
nance & Repair) 



Constitution. USS (IX-21) — Continued 
maintenance and repair 

1830s, 34, 762, 1081, 1122 

1890s, 1092, 1095 

1900s, 173, 1098 

1920s, 94, 174, 464, 765. 776, 973. 996. 1055, 1105, 

1190 
1930s, 1106 
1940s, 1115 
1950s. 1124-1125 
1960s. 176. 1128 

1970s, 176-177, 183, 194, 773, 904, 910, 1137 
portal cranes, 952, 961-962 
steam boxes, 689, 903 
viewing platform, 158, 453, 1134 
1990s, 176, 230. 261, 263, 690-691, 775, 779, 911, 957, 

1149 
2000s, 263 

dry docking history, 176n368 
equipment and materials storage, 186, 189, 274, 597, 

753, 911. 1138 
facilities, 465, 489. 581. 585, 770 
recommendations, 382 
Marblehead (Mass.) landing stage, 911 
Massachusetts Bay, restricted to, 1150 
National Historic Landmark designation, 360, 1128 
Navy, U.S., responsibility for, 199, 202 
Offices, 185, 445, 459 
"Pennies Campaign," 1105 
Pier 1 berth, 906-907 

with Constellation. USS, 147, 159, 175, 682 
construction, 155, 159 
with Dry Dock 1 caisson, 772 
panoramic photo (1904), 576 
as permanent berth of, 902 
protection dolphins, 159, 682 
subsurface drawings, 1180 
Pier 2 berth, 74, 765, 909, 915 
Pier 4 berth, 94, 104, 1053 
Pier 4A berth, 921 
Pier 8 berth, 934 
Pier 10 berth, 133, 805, 853 
Queen Elizabeth lis visit, 1139 
as receiving ship, 172 
recommissioning (1931), 1105 
recommissioning (1941), 1108 
renaming, 1102, 1105 
replica gun deck and anchor, 469 
under sail, 177, 177n376, 1150 
security 

gates, 826 (see also Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

- Gates - USS Constitution Gate) 
post-Sept 11, 2001 measures, 264, 276, 678-679, 904, 

907. 1030, 1154 
safety (exclusion) zone, 276, 680, 683. 904, 1030 
security enhancements, 681. 907 
security upgrades, 824 
visitor screening, 264, 276, 685, 1027, 1154 
tour, 174, 1106 

turnaround cruise, 578, 975, 1128 
type symbol, 1224 
with visiting ships, 256-257 
visitor services and facilities 

See also USS Constitution Museum 

gift shop, 183 

parking, 133, 158, 202-203, 217-218, 443, 824-825, 

1027, 1058-1059, 1125 
public visitation history, 253 
reopened to public (1945), 1115 
reopened to public (1975), 1138 
restrooms, 163, 169, 444-445 
security screening, 264, 276, 685, 1027, 1154 
signage, 444 

viewing platform, 158, 186, 1030, 1134 
War of 1812, 22, 172, 765, 1079, 1118-1119. 1161 
War of 1812 Bicentennial, 261 
Constitution Inn. See Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - Num- 
bered Buildings & Structures - 150 
Constitution Office Park, 241. 606 
Constitution Office Park Associates. 606-607. 1146 
Constitution Park. 607 
Constitution Quarters. See Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - 

Numbered Buildings & Structures - 42 
"Consultation in the Drafting Room" (Cnte), 1129 
Continental Navy, 1078 
Conway, USS (DD-507), 148 
Cony, USS (DD-508), 1151 

Conyngham, USS (DD-371), 108. 782. 1106. 1160 
Cooke, HMS (K.471). See Dempsey. USS (DE-267) 
Cooper Building. See Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - Num- 
bered Buildings & Structures - 38 
Cooper Leasehold Condominium. 495, 1156 
Copeland & Everett, 509 



728) 
729) 
730) 
731) 
732) 
733) 
734) 
735) 
736) 
891) 
892) 
893) 



Coral Sea, Battle of (1942). See under World War II 

Coronis, USS. See LST-1003. USS (LST-1003) 

Corps of Engineers See Army Corps of Engineers 

Corrien. Angelina M., 501 

Costello, William, 1209 

Council of National Defense, 316 

Courageous (yacht), 260-261 

Courageous Sailing Center 

educational and recreational programs, 260-262, 636 

facilities 

Building 31, 473 

Building 33. 481 

Building 230. 636 

marina slips, 238, 260, 919 

Pier 4 facilities, 261, 261n751, 274. 925, 1147 

licensing. 261n751 

opening of, 260 
Covered Lighter No. 258. See YF-258 (YF-258) 
Covered Lighter No 728 See YF-728WF- 
Covered Lighter No. 729 See YF- 729 {YF- 
Covered Lighter No 730. See YF-730 (YF 
Covered Lighter No 731 See YF-731{YF- 
Covered Lighter No. 732. See YF-732 (YF- 
Covered Lighter No 733 See YF-733 (YF- 
Covered Lighter No. 734 See YF-734 (YF- 
Covered Lighter No 735 See YF-735 (YF- 
Covered Lighter No 736 See YF-736 (YF- 
Covered Lighter No 891. See YF-891 (YF-I 
Covered Lighter No 892 See YF-892 (YF-I 
Covered Lighter No. 893 See YF-893 (YF-l 
Covered Lighter No 1226. See YFN-1226 (YFN-1226) 
Covered Lighter No 1227. See YFN-1227(YFfiA221) 
Covered Lighter No 1228 See YFN- 1228 (YFN- 1228) 
Covered Lighter No. 1229. See YFN- 1229 (YFN-1 229) 
covered lighters (YF) See under service craft 
covered lighters (non-self-propelled) (YFN) See unrferservice craft 
Covington, USS (Id. No. 1409) (aka Cincinnati. SSA 83, 996 
Cowie, USS (DD-632 / DMS-39). 1108. 1160. 1165 
Cox, Donald V., 1128 
Coxe, Trudy, 345 
Coyle, Stephen, 260n746. 933 
Cramp Shipbuilding (formerly William Cramp & Sons) 

caisson construction, 781, 785 

covered lighter construction, 1173n4 

submarine construction, 138, 138n298, 143, 1164n12 
Crandall, James L, 93n223. 830 
Crandall Dry Dock Engineers (formerly Crandall Engineering Co.), 

833 
Crandall Engineering Co., 93, 830, 833-834, 981 

See also Crandall Dry Dock Engineers (formerly Crandall 
Engineering Co.) 
Crandall family, 834 
Crane, William M , 1079-1081, 1122 

Crane Ship No 1 (AB-1) (aka Kearsarge. USS) See also 
Kearsarge. USS (BB-5 / IX-16 / AB-1) 

boom, 940 

conversion from battleship, 1203, 1219 

naming, 1203 

at Pier 2, 291 

at Pier 8, 148 

at Pier 11, 162, 940 

portal crane transport, 957 

sale for scrap, 1203, 1219 
cranes. See specific types (e.g.. bridge cranes, crawler cranes: 

floating cranes: Portal Cranes) 
crawler cranes, 639, 1203 
Craysfort Reef (Fla), 1161 
Creon, USS. See LST-1036. USS (LST-1036) 
Cretic. SS, 782, 973 
Crevalle, USS (AGSS-291). 697 
Crite, Allan Rohan, 1129-1130 

archival materials, 1187 

quay wall drawing. 875 

shipyard cleanup drawings, 600 

significance, 4 

site plan of consolidated shipyard (proposed), 171 

watercolor of Navy Yard workers, 1108 
Croatan. USS (CVHE-25), 885 
Crotty Brothers, 490. 1107 

Crouter. USS (DE-11) (aka BDE-11). 1108. 1112, 1160 
Crowley, J.M. See J M. Crowley (firm) 
Crowninshield, Benjamin. 29. 33 
cruise ships. See under ships and other vessels 
Cruiseport Boston See Boston Army Base - Facilities - Num- 
bered Buildings & Structures - 10 [119) 
Crystal Symphony MV, 325. 1071 
Cryts, Charlotte M , 502 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1 244 = Volume 3 



- 1276 



Index 



CSS Architects, 534 


DE-520. SeeLormg, HMS (DE-520) 




Cuba 


DE-521. SeeHoste, HMS (DE-521) 




Army, U.S., activities in, 314 


DE 


522. See Moorsom. HMS (DE-522) 




Bainbndge, USS. activities in, 1161 


DE 


523. See Manners. HMS (DE-523) 




Maine, USS, activities in, 1095 
Navy, U.S., activities in, 1095 


DE 


524. SeeMounsey. HMS (DE-524) 




Cullinane, James W., 1213 


DE 


525. Seelnglis, HMS (DE-525) 




Cultural Landscape Report. See under Charlestown Navy Yard 


DE 
DE 


526. See Inman. HMS (DE-526) 
558. 1115, 1169 




cultural landscapes, quidelines for, 381 










DE 


559, 1115, 1169 




Cultural Landscapes Inventory. 1 


DE 


560, 1115, 1169 




A Cultural Resources Inventory: Potential Archeological Re- 


DE 


561, 1115, 1169 




sources. Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston National Histori- 




cal Park (Mane), 2 


DE 


562, 1115, 1169 




Cumberland, USS (frigate) 


DE 


801, 1113, 1169 




in art, 1122, 1161 


DE 


802, 1113, 1169 




construction, 67. 980, 1080 


DE 


803, 1113, 1169 




conversion to sloop-of-war, 762, 1086-1087, 1160n6 


DE 


804. 1113 




Hampton Roads. Battle of (1862), 48, 1091 


DE 


805, 1113 




launch, 980, 1080, 1085 


DE 


806. 1113 




in list of ships built by Navy Yard, 1160 


DE 


807, 1113 




at Portsmouth Navy Yard, 1086 




wood from, 1091 


DE 


808. 1113 




Cumberland, USS (IX-8), 80, 82, 843, 1097, 1160 


DE 


809, 1113 




Cunard line, 793, 1149 


DE 


810, 1113 




Cuneo, John R., 593 


DE 


811, 1113 




Curacoa, HMS, 791 


DE 


812, 1113 




Curley, James M., 992 


DE 


813, 1113 




Curtis, George, 23 


DE 


814, 1113 




Curtis, Ira N., 932 


DE 


815, 1113 




Curtis Bay (Md), 14 


DE 


816, 1113 




Cushing. Leonard F., 176n366 


DE 


817, 1113 




Customs House. See under Boston (Mass.) 


DE 


818, 1113 




Cutler, John, 741 


DE 


819. 1113 




CV Dry Dock Avenue, 1155 


DE 


820, 1113 




Cyane, USS (sloop-of-war), 1084. 1122, 1160 


DE 


821, 1113 






DE 


822, 1113 




-D- 


DE 


823, 1113 






DE 


824, 1113 




D. Cicconi, Inc., 919 


DE 


825, 1113 




D-Day. See World War II - Operation Overlord 


DE 


826, 1113 




Dacey, Brian F., 342 


DE 


827. 1113 




Dacres, HMS (K.472). See Duffy. USS (DE-268) 


DE 


828, 1113 




Daly, USS(DD-519), 917 


DE 


829, 1113 




Daly. William T, 1137 


DE 


830, 1113 




Damato, USS (DD-871), 917 


DE 


831, 1113 




Daniel Marr & Son Co., 568 


DE-832, 1113 




Darrow, Charles S., 442, 447 


deSibour, J.H., 1033 




Dartmouth Construction Co., 445 


de Steiguer, Louis, 1104 




Dave Gardner, Contractor, Inc., 640, 775 


Dealey. USS (DE-1006), 654 




Davis, Amasa, 434 


Deans, Charles, 1149 




Davis, Joseph W. "Jack." 141 


Dearborn, Henry, 994, 1078 




Davis Watson Co., 91 


Decatur, Stephen, 479 




Dayton. USS (CL-105), 149, 302, 641, 886 


Decatur. USS (DD-936 / DDG-31) 
boilers. 1208 




DC-4 (aircraft), 1065 
DD-735. 145 


conversion to guided-missile destroyer, 151-152, I 
945, 1131, 1207 


J08, 922. 


DD-736, 145 


mast. 555, 1212 




DD-737, 145 


missile launcher assemblies, 924 




DD-738, 145 


stack, 555, 962 




DD-739, 145 


Decatur, USS (sloop-of-war), 36 




DD-740, 145 


Deede, USS (DE-263), 1112. 1160 




DD-905, 1115, 1168 


Deer Island Light, 300 




DD-906. 1115. 1168 


Defense Appropriations Acts. See also Naval Appropriations Acts 


DD-907. 1115. 1168 


FY 1941 Supplemental, 1107 




DD-908, 1115. 1168 


FY 1952, 551 




DD-939, USS (former German destroyer Z-39), 800 


FY 1953, 567 
FY 1954, 592 




DDG-30. See Rommel, FGNS (D-187) 


FY 1956, 568, 629, 918, 928, 940 




DE 


269. See Domett. HMS (K.473) 


FY 1957, 931. 942 




DE 


280. See Kingsmill. HMS (DE-280) 


FY 1962, 907 




DE 


425, 1113, 1168 


FY 1964, 767. 769 




DE 


426. 1113, 1168 


FY 1967, 807, 809 




DE 


427, 1113, 1168 


FY 1968. 807, 809 




DE 


428, 1113, 1168 


FY 1974, 875 
FY 1976. 324 




DE 


429, 1113, 1168 


FY 1989. 1096 




DE 


430, 1113, 1168 


Defense Authorization Act 




DE 


431, 1113, 1168 


FY 2010. 1157 




DE 


432, 1113, 1168 


Defense Contract Management Agency, 324 




DE 


433, 1113, 1168 


Defense Dept., U.S. (aka Pentagon / War Dept ) 




DE 


434, 1113, 1168 


Assistant Secretary (Installations & Logistics), 335 




DE 


435, 1113, 1168 


Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) (see Base 


Realign- 


DE 


436, 1113, 1168 


ment and Closure) 




DE 


437, 1113. 1168 


Charlestown Navy Yard 




DE 


516. See Lawford. HMS (DE-516) 


closure, 769, 834 
control of property, 19, 31 




DF 


517 See Louis. HMS (DE-517) 


criticisms of, 306. 1131 




DE 


518. See Lawson. HMS (DE-518) 


context studies for resource evaluation, 367 




DE-519 SeePasley. HMS (DE-519) 







Defense Dept, U.S. — Conlinwd 

Deputy Assistant Secretary (Installations & Logistics), 322- 

323 
Deputy Secretary, 324 
Fargo Building retention, 323-324 
hazardous materials remediation, 332 
internal production vs. private enterprise, 48 
Legacy Resource Management Program, 360. 362, 379 
Military Sealift Command (see Military Sealift Command) 
National Military Context (NMC) (see National Military Con- 
text) 
New York Naval Shipyard closure. 306. 1131 
Office of Economic Adjustment, 213 
personnel safety and security, 378-379 
Portsmouth Naval Shipyard phase out, 1131 
Section 106 compliance reminder, 203 
ship construction phase out, 984-985 
South Boston Annex occupancy concerns, 335 
Defense Environmental Restoration Program-Formerly Used De- 
fense Sites (DERP-FUDS) 
Army Corps of Engineers, responsibilities of, 248 
Army Corps of Engineers demolition & remediation projects. 
248-250 
identification of Navy Yard sites. 248, 552-553. 572-573, 

1149 
Building 105 (Chain Forge), 245, 249-250. 553, 1150- 

1151 
Building 108 (Central Power Plant). 244, 249, 380, 573. 

1150 
Building 194 (Gasoline Station), 249 
Building 203 (Incinerator), 249. 868, 1149 
Building 206 (Administration Building). 249. 862, 1149 
Building 226 (Industrial Services Building). 944-945 
Building 277 (Oxygen Storage & Filling). 249. 868. 1149 
Hingham/Cohasset Army Reserve Center. 1101 
liquid oxygen tank. 867 

Marine Railway 11, 230, 249, 249n688, 834, 1149 
Parcel 5, 244 
Parcel 6. 244 
Parcel 7, 244 

Pier 9, 244, 249, 855-856, 1149 
Pier 10, 244, 249, 856, 1149 
South Boston Annex. 248. 332, 332n211 
Structure 220 (Fuel Oil Tank), 249. 630, 758, 1149-1150 
Structure 250 (Light Tower), 249, 944 
Structure 251 (Light Tower), 249, 944-945 
Structure 252 (Light Tower), 249, 944-945 
underground storage tanks. 249. 505, 630, 1149-1150 
Congressional authorization, 248, 248n680 
Defense Investigative Service, 324 
Defense Property Disposal Office, 587, 1176, 1179 
Defense Supply Agency (DSA), 205-206, 322-323 
Delaware. USS (BB-28), 789 
Delaware, USS (ship-of-the-hne), 34, 36, 1081 
Dell Painting Co , 493 
DeLong, USS (TB-28). 580 
DeLony, Eric 

HAER photography, 7, 207-210, 384, 393 
HAER study of Navy Yard, 206, 206n467, 207n1 
Delphy USS (DD-261), 831 
Delta Africa, SS, 319 
Delta Scientific Corp., 678 
Demetn Enterprises, 725, 1151 

Dempsey. USS (DE-267) (aka Cooke, HMS), 1112, 1160, 1174 
Dennis Driscoll & Co., 642 
Dennis J. Buckley. USS (DE-553). 1115, 1160 
Department of Commerce. See Commerce Dept., U.S. 
Department of Defense See Defense Dept., U.S. 
Department of the Interior See Interior Dept.. U.S. 
Department of the Navy See Navy Depl , US 
Department of the Treasury. See Treasury Dept , US 
Department of Transportation Act (1966), 218, 218n493, 1220 
deperming, definition of, 939. 1203 
Depression. See Great Depression 
DER-539 See Wagner. USS (DE-539 / DER-539) 
DER-540. See Vandivier. USS (DE-540 / DER-540) 
DERP-FUDS See Defense Environmental Restoration Program- 
Formerly Used Defense Sites 
Desmond, Childs & Adams. 183, 328 

destroyer escorts See ships and other vessels - escort vessels 
destroyer minelayers. See under ships and other vessels 
destroyers See under ships and other vessels 
Detroit, USS (screw sloop) See Canandaigua, USS (screw sloop) 
DEW See Distant Early Warning Line 
Dewey, George, 4n10. 764, 1096 
DeweyiyD-2) See YD-2 {YD-2) 
Dexter, Aaron, 1080, 1082 
Deyo. Morton L , 426. 1116. 1189 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



1277- 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



die-lock chain, 107 

compared to wrought iron and cast steel chain, 107 
development of, 105. 107, 485, 550, 1105. 1121 
first use of, 107 

last made by Navy Yard, 107, 1137 

manufacture of (see also Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 
- Numbered Buildings & Structures - 105) 
dies, 194, 194n401 
equipment, 153, 165 
process, 107, 1209 
production line, 209 
television program about, 1125 
as Navy standard, 107, 550, 1105 
in Navy Yard statement of significance, iii, 3, 360 
storage, 115 

as U.S. Lighthouse Service standard, 1105 
Diminic, Jasenka (Hrska), 997 
Dionne. USS (DE-261), 1112, 1160 
Distant Early Warning Line (DEW), 1197 
Divers Boat No 7. 915 
D.J. Donovan's Sons, 493 
DLJ-Hoffman Inc., 1145 
DM-23, 145 



DM 
DM 
DM 
DM 
DM 



-24, 145 
-25, 145 
-26, 145 
-27, 145 
1-28, 145 

DMS-24. See Forrest. USS (DD-461 / DMS-24) 
DMS-25. See Fitch, USS (DD-462 / DMS-25) 
DMS-39. See Come. USS (DD-632 / DMS-39) 
DMS-40. See Knight. USS (DD-633 / DMS-40) 
DMS-41. See Doran. USS (DD-634 / DMS-41) 
DMS-42. See Earle. USS (DD-635 / DMS-42) 
Dobbin, James C , 471, 816 
Dodge, Frederick A., 1213 
Doherty, Hugh, 1213 
Doherty, John W. "Jack," 183, 501, 717 
Dolezal, Doug, 481 

Dolezal Architecture & Interior Design, 481 
Domett. HMS (K.473). See Eisner. USS (DE-192) (aka Domett, 

HMS (K.473)) 
Don Chedi. HTMS (MSC-8), 910 
Don Giannangelo Contractors, 1139 
Donahue, C, 1126 
Donley, H. Lee, 655 
Donnell, William, 758 
Donnelly, Brian, 325 

Donner, USS (LSD-20), 1115, 1160, 1165 
Dorado. USS (SS-526), 1115, 1160 
Doran, USS (DD-634 / DMS-41), 1108, 1160 
Dorchester (Mass.). See also Federated Dorchester Neighborhood 
Houses 
Columbia Point, 259 
Dortch, USS (DD-712), 918 
Dowling, Michael, 688 
Downes, Carrie, 981 
Downes, John 

assuming position of Navy Yard Commandant, 1084-1085 
Building 10 recommendations, 450 
Building 31 recommendation, 470 
Building 42 recommendations, 508 
Building 79 recommendations, 531 
career overview, 1122 
Dry Dock 1 safety recommendations, 762 
First Ave. paving recommendations, 1004 
portrait, 1081, 1122 
Quarters G repairs, 423 
Doyle, USS(FFG-39), 919 
Dragone, R , 1126 
Draper, William F. 927 
Draper & Kramer, 515 
drop hammer, 153, 1183 
Dry Dock 3 Park. See South Boston Annex - Facilities - Other 

Structures & Facilities - Brian R. Skerry Memorial Park 
Dry Dock Caisson (Dry Dock I), 1173 
Dry Dock Engineers, 798 
dry docks. See also floating dry docks 

See also under Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities; Long 
Beach Naval Shipyard, Mare Island Naval Shipyard; New 
York Naval Shipyard; Norfolk Naval Shipyard; Pearl 
Harbor Naval Shipyard; Philadelphia Naval Shipyard; 
Portsmouth Naval Shipyard; Puget Sound Naval Ship- 
yard; San Francisco Naval Shipyard. South Boston An- 
nex - Facilities 
definition of, 760, 1204 
pump houses, 595 
Drydock Associates, 1147 



Dubiel, Lynne. 261 

Duffy, USS (DE-268) (aka Dacres. HMS), 1160. 1174 

Dukakis, Michael S., 1139 

Duke, C, 1126 

Duke of York. See Andrew, Prince (United Kingdom) 

Duncan, Charles A., 47 

Duo-Gard Industries, 684 

Durasteel, 679 

DwightD. Eisenhower. USS (CVN-69 / CVAN-69), 107, 1137 



"E" Street Annex. See under South Boston Annex 

Eagle. USCG (WIX-327), 256. 1153. 1157 

Eagle 27. USS (PE-27), 927 

Eagle 48. USS (PE-48). 927 

Earle. Mrs. Ralph, 1110-1111 

Earle, Ralph. 1110 

Earle. USS (DD-635 / DMS-42), 140, 1108, 1110-1111, 1160 

Early 20th Century South Boston Waterfront Development district 

(proposed), 362 
Easby, John W„ 547 

East Boston (Mass.). See also East Boston Fuel Depot Annex; 
East Boston Fuel Pier; Lockwood's Basin 
Army shipping from. 317 
Commonwealth Pier No. 1, 123 
damage from Building 114 explosion, 860 
General Ship Corp. property, 337n264 
Logan Airport, 351, 874. 877 
National Dock, 123 
Naval Operating Base, 1124 
Noddles Island, 15 

shipyards [see also under Bethlehem Steel Co., Bromfield 
Corp.; General Ship Corp ; McKay, Donald) 
Dry Dock 1 Caisson rehabilitation, 230. 770, 775, 1149 
timber-bending machine, 546-547 
tunnels, 1150 

view from Navy Yard, 37, 145, 174, 1174 
view of Navy Yard from, 510 
World War II Navy activities, 92-93. 123-124, 278 
East Boston Fuel Depot Annex, 123-124, 125, 146, 1109, 1128 

fuel pipeline, 123-125 
East Boston Fuel Pier, 123-124, 125 
Eastern National, 226, 255, 426, 449, 759. 1155 
Echols, USS (APB-37 / APL-37 / IX-504), 1115, 1160. 1160n7. 

1165 
Eclipse (freighter) (aka Mount Olympus. USS (AGC-8), 145 
Economic Development & Industrial Corp. of Boston (EDIC), 335- 
336 

See also Boston Marine Industrial Park 
archival materials, 1188, 1192 
Army, U.S., conveyance of land to, 1148 
Board, 345n316 
Boston Army Base 

disposition parcels, 322 

Facilities (see specific facilities under Boston Army Base 

- Facilities) 
homeport proposal, 324 
purchase of, 333, 1145 
redevelopment, 344-345 
BRA merger, 336, 1149, 1204 
director, 342n286, 892 (see also Dacey, Brian F , Swartz Lloyd, 

Marilyn; Westgate, Michael) 
Economic Development Plan for BMIP, 1139 
Environmental Impact Report, 1139 
establishment, 1134 
General Ship Corp. mortgage, 337n264 
grants awarded to, 1144 
Industrial Job Training Center, 1139 
lease agreements 
conditions, 334 

South Boston Annex lease from GSA, 1138 
summary table, 340 
5-11 Drydock LLC (Parcel B), 1151 
Au Bon Pain (Parcel O / Building 29), 715. 1145 
Boston Port Service (Parcel M / Building 31). 347n347 

717. 876, 1146 
Boston Sand & Gravel (Building 16), 698. 1150 
Boston Ship Repair (Dry Dock 3), 693. 961 
Boston Thermal Cogeneration Corp. (Building 30), 341 
Boston Thermal Cogeneration Corp. (Parcel F|Y]), 1148 
Boston Thermal Cogeneration Corp (Parcel X), 891 
Braswell Shipyards (Parcel V / Dry Dock 4), 727, 800- 

801, 1138, 1144 
Building 114 piecemeal leases, 344 
Coastal Cement Corp. (Parcel K / Building 116). 344, 

1146 
Coastal Cement Corp. (Parcel Z). 894 
Commercial Lobster Co (Building 56), 343 
CV Dry Dock Avenue (Building 114), 1155 
Demetri Enterprises (Parcel L2 / Building 54), 725, 1151 



Economic Development & Industrial Corp of Boston (EDIC) 
lease agreements — Continued 

DLJ-Hoffman Inc. (Parcel I / Building 114), 1145 

Dry Dock 3 short term leases. 337, 339, 709, 963, 1139 

Drydock Associates (Parcel J / Building 114), 1147 

First Trade Union Bank (Building 15), 870-871 

Frank Bean, Inc (30 Drydock Ave), 732 

General Ship Corp (8th St ). 1075 

General Ship Corp (Dry Dock 3). 709, 791. 793 

General Ship Corp (Parcel S / Building 53), 723 

General Ship Corp. (Parcel V / Dry Dock 4). 337, 337n262, 

339, 343, 723. 727, 800-801, 1145 
Geo-Trans International / Neil Fitzpatnck (Parcel T / Build- 
ing 19), 341, 703. 872, 1150 
Harbor Gateway Associates (five buildings), 1148 
Harpoon Brewery (Parcel S / Building 53), 354 
ICCNE LLC (Parcels D, E, T, T-1), 341, 703, 870. 872. 

1155 
John J. Daly Co. (Parcel L2 / Building 54), 724-725 
John J. Daly Co. (Parcel R / Building 18), 339, 701, 1145 
JohnNagleCo. (Parcel S / Building 53), 343, 723, 1146, 

1156 
Leonard Silver Manufacturing Co. (Parcel T / Building 

19). 703 
Marlyn Utilities (Parcel G / Buildings 20. 40. and utility 

system). 707, 1139 
Mass. Bay Brewing Co (Parcel S / Building 53). 343. 

723. 1156 
Massport (Buildings 117 and 118), 347, 347n346, 1144 
Massport (Parcel M-1). 348, 733, 876, 1144 
MIP Parking Facility Trust (Parcel Y), 342n286, 892, 1 1 48 
New Boston Seafood Center (Parcel X), 891, 1150 
New England Design Center (Parcel F / Building 114). 

1146 
O'Connell Seafood (Parcel W / Building 57), 342-343. 

343n294, 887, 1145 
Park Realty Trust (Parcel P / Building 1 4), 694, 1145 
Purolator Courier (Parcel D / Building 1 2). 340. 871 , 11 45 
PX Engineering (Parcel N / Building 16), 697-698. 1144 
Stavis Seafood (Parcel U / Building 17). 343, 700. 1145 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners Local 33 

(Building 15), 870-871 
Verizon (Parcel G / Building 40), 720 
VII Corp, (Parcel W / Building 57), 343, 887, 1145 
Wharf 8 Associates (Parcel W/ Building 56) 727, 1154 
Massport 

development agreement with, 1144 
disputes with, 347 
offices, 354, 721, 871 
seafood processing, 881-882, 891 
South Boston Annex 

development rights for, 1144 
"E" Street Annex, 347 
easements, 1147 

Facilities (see specific facilities under South Boston An- 
nex - Facilities) 
financing, 334 

lawsuit with federal government, 334, 1144, 1148 
portal cranes, 956 
possession of, 337, 337n255 
purchase of. 334, 334n229, 1139 
Economic Development Administration (EDA), 337, 997 
Ed-Mac Inc., 784 

EDA See Economic Development Administration 
EDG See Engineers Design Group 
Edgeworth Tool Co., 1088 

EDIC See Economic Development & Industrial Corp of Boston 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., 90 

See also Boston Edison Co 
Edisto, USS (AGB-2). 954 
Edward H. Allen. USS (DE-531). 1113. 1160 
Edward McDonnell. USS (DE-1043), 1222 
Edwards & Kelcey, 882 
Einhorn Yaffee Prescott, 685 

Eisner. USS (DE-192) (aka Domett. HMS (K 473)), 776, 1160, 11 74 
Elden. USS (DE-264), 1112, 1160 
Eldndge, Benjamin W, 442, 1058, 1088 
Elizabeth II, Queen (United Kingdom), 177, 256. 1139 
Elkus Manfredi Architects, 847 
Elliott, Jesse D. 

appointment as Navy Yard Commandant, 1081 
career overview, 1122 

Navy Yard facilities and. 34 458, 482 516, 810. 813 
portrait, 1081. 1122 
Ellis, William H. See W.H. Ellis & Son Co 
Ells. Alfred, 1183 
Endicott & Co , 50 

Engineers Design Group (EDG) 892-893 
Ennghl, Earl F. 1109, 1112 
Enterprise. USS (schooner), 479, 1106. 1205 
Environmental Protection Agency barge acquired from. 222 770. 
905. 958. 1144, 1157 



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Pages 1077-1 244 = Volume 3 



1278 



Index 



Environmental Waste Technology, Inc ., 630 

Epstin, Harold. 833 

Erie, Lake, 11n6 

Erie Concrete & Supply, 11 73n4 

Erncolo, James R, 1210 

Essex. USS (CVS-9). 161, 874. 1066 

Essex, USS (IX-10). 1160, 1160n8 

Essex-class aircraft carriers, 303, 790, 943 

Eugene A. Greene. USS (DE-549), 1115, 1163 

Eugene R, Eisenberg, Inc., 626 

Europa. MV, 735 

Evacuation (St. Patricks) Day Parade. 976. 1127 

Evans, Samuel (Captain). 29 

Evans. Samuel Emrys (artist), 477 

Evarts. USS (DE-5 / BDE-5), 1108-1109, 1163, 1165 

Evatt Construction Co., 89, 511, 602, 609, 858 

Everett F. Larson. USS (DE-554). 1115. 1163 

Everhart, Gary E„ 218, 245 

Exchange Authority LLP, 725, 1156 

Executive Order 7034, 1106 



F- 



Facilities Review Board, 426 

Fairbanks-Morse, 639 

Fall River (Mass.), 771 

Falmouth. USS (sloop-of-war), 1081, 1122, 1163 

Fargo Building (aka Barnes Building). See under South Boston 

(Mass.) 
Fargo Real Estate Trust, 297 
Fargo Street Terminal, 307, 1063 
Farragut, David G. 48, 980, 1121-1122 
Farrell, Hopper & Co., 780 
Fatsa. TCG (M-502). 1 53 
Fay, Christopher J., 502 
Fay, Frederic H., 315-316 
Fay, Spofford & Thorndike, 315-316, 798, 809 
Federal Employees Credit Union. See Charlestown Navy Yard - 

Facilities - Numbered Buildings & Structures - 32 
Federal Employees Veterans Association (FEVA), 1115 

See also National Association of Government Employees 
(NAGE) 
Federal Highway Administration, 218, 351, 628 
Federal Lands Highway Program (FLHP), 230 
Federal Property and Administrative Services Act (1949), 234, 

234n591, 332 
Federated Dorchester Neighborhood Houses, 342. 883. 1150 
Fehlaber Pipe Co., 696 
Felch. Cheever, 1079, 1120 
Fern's Diner, 883 
Ferranti. Lawrence L., 1210 
ferry boats. See water shuttles and ferry service 
FEVA See Federal Employees Veterans Association 
FHWA. See Federal Highway Administration 
Fillmore, Millard, 1086 
Finagle A Bagel shop, 491 
Fire Prevention Parade, 503, 1006 
Fire Prevention Week, 299. 1006 

First Charlestown Development Corp. See Navy Yard Plaza De- 
velopment Associates 
First Naval District. See also Supervisor of Shipbuilding & Con- 
version (SUPSHIPS) Boston 
abbreviations for, 1193, 1202 
archival materials, 1176, 1179, 1186-1187 
Band, 619 
Chief of Staff (see also Leverone, Robert M.) 

quarters, 43. 185. 439 
Commandant (see also Charlestown Navy Yard - Comman- 
dant; Deyo, Morton L.; Momsen. Charles B., Rumble. 
Richard E.; Snyder, Roy D.; Thebaud, Hewlett, Wylie, 
Joseph C.) 
activities under, 1215 
archival materials, 1189 
Building 4 proposals, 444 
as Commander, Naval Base Boston, 1116 
on Fargo Building costs, 323 
flag, 649 

historic structures survey and, 196-197 
offices, 468 

quarters, 43, 246, 422, 426, 1115 
separation from Navy Yard Commandant post. 43. 426, 

1082, 1112, 1115 
ships named for, 426 
War Memorial unveiling. 667 
facilities 

barracks. 480-481 

Chief of Staff's quarters, 43, 185, 439 



First Naval District 

facilities — Continued 

Commandant's quarters, 43, 246, 422, 426, 1115 
documentation of, 94, 103, 484, 1101, 1178 
headquarters, 186, 298. 1193. 1215 
historic structures survey. 196-197 
net depots. 699 

offices, 96, 297-298, 447, 468, 499, 1107 
personnel facilities, 480-481 
Public (Officers) Quarters, 869-870 
South Boston Annex staff quarters, 328 
utility systems, 565, 704 
Legal Officer, 944 
National Park proposal, 198 
Public Works Officer (see Husband, Alexander C.) 
ship conversion efforts, 144 
Transshipment Pool, 304 
First Trade Union Bank, 870-872, 893 
Fish & Wildlife Service, U.S., 593 
Fish Pier (Pier 6). See under South Boston (Mass.) 
Fiske. USS (DD-842). 936. 1211 

Fitch, USS (DD-462/DMS-25), 137, 987-988, 1107. 1163, 1177 
Fitchburg Railroad. See also Hoosac Docks Branch. Hoosac 
Stores No. 1 & 2 
Navy Yard railroad tracks. 970 
as part of Boston & Maine Railroad, 70n177, 972 
Pier 1 and Fitchburg Slip improvements 
building construction, 78, 580, 1096 
building demolition, 68, 78, 450-451, 580, 898, 1096 
financing, 70n177, 898, 1095 
legislation, 1095 
Pier 1 reconstruction, 70 
use agreement, 70n177, 898 
Fitchburg Slip 

historic vessels assigned to, 159, 682 
physical relationship to Pier 1, 826 
Railroad Gate, 823 
reconstruction 

Boundary Wall changes, 742, 898 
building demolition, 65, 68, 78, 574, 898 
completion, 68 
financing, 70n177, 1095 
legislation, 899, 1095 
steel sheet piling, 902 
use agreement, 898 
seawall, 898-899, 902 
security measures, 276, 682-683 
Fitzgerald, John F„ 172 
Fitzpatrick, Neil, 341, 703, 872 
F.J. O'Hara & Sons, 1157 
flags 

Colors (flag raising and loweing), 648-649, 753, 911 
Fort McHenry flag ("Star Spangled Banner"), 479 
Flagship Wharf. See Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - Num- 
bered Buildings & Structures - 197 
Flagship Wharf Realty Trust. 617, 1147-1148 
Flaherty, Joseph, 481 
Flaherty, Thomas A.. 24 
Fleet Bank, 337n264 

Fleet Rehabilitation And Modernization, Mark I (FRAM I) (SCB- 
206) 

average time for completion, 150n308 
Navy Yard projects, 150, 807, 809, 933, 953, 1128, 1131 
prototype ship, 150, 150n308 
purpose, 150, 807 
Fleet Rehabilitation And Modernization. Mark II (FRAM II). 150. 

767 
FleetBoston Pavilion See Bank of America Pavilion 
Fleming, USS (DE-271) (aka Carlies, HMS). 1163, 1163n9 
Fletcher-c\ass destroyers, 140, 148, 150, 1124, 1165 
FLHP See Federal Lands Highway Program 
floating cranes (YD), 1219 
Floating Derrick No. 2 (YD-2). See YD-2 (YD-2) 
Floating Derrick No 13 (YD-1 3). See YD- 13 (YD-1 3) 
Floating Derrick No. 21 (YD-21) See YD-21 (YD-21) 
Floating Derrick No. 22 (YD-22). See YD-22 (YD-22) 
Floating Derrick No. .35 (YD-35). See YD-35 (YD-35) 
Floating Derrick No. 77IYD-77). See VD-77(YD-77) 
Floating Derrick No 779(YD-179). See YD- 179 (YD-1 79) 
floating derricks (YD) See under service craft 
floating dry docks (YFD), 14, 1219 
Floating Pile Driver No 5 See YPD-5 (YPD-5) 
floating pile drivers (YPD) See under service craft 
Floating Workshop No. 1 (YR-1 / YD-23). 1097, 1173 
floating workshops (YR) See under service craft 
floats (platforms), 1207 
Florida. USS (BB-30), 94. 104. 283, 789 
F/or/da-class battleships. 789 
Flushing (NY). 426 



Flynn. Joseph E., 931 
Flynn, Raymond L., 336, 344n313 

Flynn Park See South Boston Annex - Facilities - Parcels - Z 
Foley. HMS (K.474). See Gillette. USS (DE-270) 
Foley, William. 680 
Ford, Gerald, 194 
I ord Motor Co., 927 

Fore River Dock & Dredge (South Portland, Me), 905. 1157 
Fore River Shipyard (Quincy, Mass.). See also Bethlehem Steel 
Co.; General Dynamics 

labor strike, 151-152 

manager (see Bergeson, Lloyd) 

shipbuilding, 85, 138, 790, 793, 1200 
Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ), 339 

foreign transfer of vessels. See under ships and other vessels 
Formichella, Andrew. 888 

Forrest. USS (DD-461 / DMS-24). 137, 987, 988, 1107, 1163 
Forrest Sherman. USS (DD-931), 686 
Forrest Sherman-c\ass destroyers. 151 
Forrestal, James V, 1112 
Forrestal. USS (CVA-59 / AVT-59), 1193 
ForrestaMass aircraft carriers, 107, 153, 180, 304. 790. 1124 
Fort Clark (N.C.), 1123 
Fort Devens. See under Ayer (Mass.) 
Fort Dix (N.J.), 324 
Fort Fairfield (Me), 1121 
Fort Fisher Campaign See under Civil War 
Fort Hatteras (N.C.), 1123 

Fort Independence. See under South Boston (Mass.) 
FortMandan, USS (LSD-21) (aka /Vafl<rafouss3(L-153)), 142, 1115. 

1163, 1174 
Fort Mason. See under San Francisco (Calif.) 
Fort Point Channel. 279 
Fort Sumter. See under Charleston (S.C.) 
Foulkes, T, 1126 
Fournier Towing & Dredging, 943 
Fowler, Orson S., 470 
Fox, Gustavus V, 15 
FRAM I See Fleet Rehabilitation And Modernization, Mark I (FRAM 


FRAM II See Fleet Rehabilitation And Modernization, Mark II 

(FRAM II) 
France 

King George's War, 258-259 

Navy Yard ship repairs, 134, 301, 949 

Quasi-War, 172 

World War I, 12, 316 

World War II, 120. 949, 1107, 1114 
Francis M. Robinson. USS (DE-220), 148 
Frank Bean. Inc., 732 
Franklin, Aretha. 889 
Franklin, Paul J.. 1189 

Franklin, USS (ship-of-the-line), 55, 1085-1086 
Franklin D Roosevelt, USS (CVA-42), 793 
Franklin Environmental, 553 

Frazier, Daniel (aka James North), 479, 1106, 1205 
Frazier. USS (DD-607), 479 
Fred T Berry, USS (DDE-858), 767, 953 
Fred Williams Inc., 867 
Frederick, USS. See Maryland, USS (CA-8) 
Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site See under Brooklino 

(Mass.) 
Frederick Raff Co.. 630 
Freedom Trail See under Boston (Mass) 
Freight Lighter No. 77 (YF-77 / YR-11), 1102, 1173 
Freight Lighter No. 7fl(YF-78), 1102, 1173 
Freight Lighter No 79(YF-79 / YFN-79), 1102, 1173 
Freight Lighter No 50(YF-80 / YFN-80). 1102, 1173 
Freight Lighter No 81 (YF-81 /YFN-81), 1102, 1173 
Freight Lighter No 82(\f-82 I YFN-82), 1102. 1173 
freight lighters (YF). See under service craft 
Fremont, John C. (1813-1890), 1099 
Fremont John C. (1851-1911). 828 .098 1099 
French, John W , 608. 611 
Friedman, Juliet, 1153 

Friends of the Charlestown Navy Yard, 248. 999. 1155 
Friends of the Museum of Printing. 258 
Friendship (merchant ship). 1122 
Friendship Club See later name Boston Marine Society 
Friendship of Salem (replica merchant ship). 262, 382 
Frolic. USS (sloop-of-war), 22. t '2n45, 1079 
FT 5. HMS (aka APc-55. USS). 1196 
FTZ See Foreign Trade Zone 
Fullam. USS (DD-474). 988. 1109. 1163. 1176 
Fyffe, Joseph, 1090. 1092 



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Pages 395-1 076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



1279 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



G-2. USS (SS-27), 921 
Gage, Thomas, 546 

Garbage Lighter No. 5(YG-5 / YGN-5), 82, 1097, 1173 
garbage lighters (YG). See under service craft 
Gardiner. HMS (DE-274), 1112, 1174 
See also O'Toole. USS (DE-274) 
r ,, 1 1 c 1 1 1. r . I 1 1 1< f 1 1 M 

Garlies, HMS. See Fleming, USS (DE-271) (aka Garlies. HMS) 
Gearing-class destroyers, 150, 768, 1128 
Gemini 9 (spacecraft), 723 
Gemini 12 (spacecraft), 955 
General Dynamics, 1200 

See also Fore River Shipyard (Quincy, Mass.) 
General Electric Co., 466, 1092 
General HW. Butner, USS (AP-113). 1197 
General Painting & Maintenance Corp., 568 
General Services Administration (GSA) 

Boston Army Base disposal, 322-324, 1145, 1148 
Charlestown Navy Yard and, 183, 248, 1007, 1139, 1144, 1195 
Fargo Building disposal, 323-324 
Hingham facilities disposal, 149, 1100-1101 
South Boston Annex and 
appraisal, 329, 333, 890 
Boston's plan to purchase, 335 
Coast Guard interest in, 332 
"E" Street Annex disposal, 1131 
EDIC lease agreement, 336-337, 337n255, 1138 
Historic Preservation Act requirements, 333 
"K" Street Annex disposal, 1128 
photographs, 328 
reuse proposals, 334-335 
sale to Government Land Bank. 333, 1139 
General Ship Corp. 

CA/T project and, 351 
East Boston facilities, 337n264 
financial difficulties, 337, 337n264 
lease agreements 

Building 21 use, 709 
Building 38, 337, 337n262. 723 
Building 53, 337, 337n262. 723 
Building 56, 337, 337n262, 343, 723. 727 
Dry Dock 3, 339, 709, 791, 793 

Dry Dock 4, 337, 337n262, 339, 723, 727, 800. 1145 
Pier 5, 1145 
Pier 6, 1145 
streets included, 1075 
parking and storage areas, 884 
portal cranes, 964-965, 967 
ship repair, 339, 793, 800-801 
Genesee, USS (aka Hatlie C. Besse), 50, 1087, 1163 
Geneva Convention, 1207 
Geo-Trans International, 703, 1150 
George, USS (DE-276) (aka Goodson, HMS), 1163, 1174 

See also Goodson, HMS (DE-276) 
George lawley & Son, 138 
George W. Harvey (firm), 26, 661, 1096 
Georgia Institute of Technology 

Center for Architectural Conservation 
Preservation Tech Notes, 607 
Germany 

expansionist threats (1930s), 12, 577 
vessels transferred to, 1135-1136, 1169, 1174 
World War I 

submarines, 83, 760 

U.S. declaration of war against, 83, 316, 1102 
vessels sunk by, 83, 760 
vessels taken from, 82-83, 788, 996, 1105 
World War II 

outbreak, 120, 1107 
submarines, 134-135, 145, 766, 791 
U.S. declaration of war against, 1108 
vessels damaged/sunk by, 135-136, 766, 791, 1166 
vessels taken from, 800 
Geron/mo(/7"-779/YTM-119), 107n244, 108, 766, 1105, 1163 
Gherardi, Walter R, 1106 
Gilbert Islands, USS (CVE-107 / AKV-39) (aka Annapolis, USS 

(AGMR-D), 302.949 
Gillette, USS (DE-270) (aka Foley, HMS), 1163, 1163n9, 1174 
Ginsberg, Doug, 1209 
Glacier, USS (AGB-4), 697 
Gladstone Associates, 336 
Glassman. Jack I., 2 

Gleason's Pictorial Drawing Room Companion, 423, 517. 1187 
Gleaves, Albert, 1104 
G/eaves-class destroyers, 1129, 1166 
Glover, USS (FF-1098), 339, 947 
Glynco Naval Air Station, 1137 
Godding, Paul D., 1137 



Goethals, George W., 316 

Gold, Pleasant D., Jr.. 425-426, 500. 567. 656, 1116, 1124 

Goldberg, A George, 625 

Golden Princess, MV, 325 

Goldman, Max M., 991, 1213 

Goodall, HMS (aka Reybold, USS). 1112. 1174 

See also Reybold, USS (DE-275) 
Gooding, Robert C , 500, 1125, 1134, 1199 
Goodrich, USS (DDR-831), 924 
Goodson, HMS (DE-276) (aka George, USS), 1112, 1174 

See also George, USS (DE-276) 
Gore, HMS (DE-277) (aka Herzog, USS), 1112, 1174 

See also Herzog, USS (DE-277) 
Gosport Navy Yard. See Norfolk Naval Shipyard 
Goudreau Corp., 910 

Gould, HMS (K.476). See Lovermg, USS (DE-272) 
Government Land Bank, 333, 333n222, 334, 713, 1138-1139, 1148 
Grady, Mrs. Ronan C, 1109 
Grady, Rhoda C, 1109 
Grady, Ronan C, 1109 
Grafton (Ohio) 

Nancy's Mainstreet Diner, 342, 883 
Grainger (firm). 872 
Grampus, USS (SS-523) (aka Rio Grande do Su/(S-11)), 143, 

1115, 1163, 1174 
Grant, Ulysses S„ 1088 
Grant Administration, 55 
Gray's Ropewalk, 521 
Great Britain 

American Revolution 

Breed's Hill landing site, ill, 3, 15, 360. 362, 446, 546, 

1077 
Breed's Hill landing site plaques, 15,197, 362, 446, 546, 

1106 
burning of Charlestown, 15. 1077 
Charlestown settlers (1625), 1077 
Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1123 
royal dockyards, 31n69 
Royal family visit, 262, 1139, 1152 
visiting ships, 257. 262 
War of 1812, 11n6, 19, 22, 1079, 1086 
World War I, 603, 1105 
World War II 

Charlestown Navy Yard vessel repair, 301 

Lend-Lease Act and, 134, 1107, 1165 

outbreak, 120, 1107 

transport ships, 317, 766 

vessels loaned to, 1163. 1163n9, 1168, 1168n14, 1171, 

1171n18 
vessels transferred to 

escort vessels, 120, 134, 141, 1108, 1160, 1163-1164, 

1168, 1170-1171 
list of, 1174 
naming of, 1159 

tank landing ships, 142, 1109, 1114, 1169 
Great Depression, 12, 1129 
Great Esker Park. See under Weymouth (Mass.) 
Great Lakes, 11n6, 153, 951, 1200, 1219 
Great Republic (clipper ship), 477 
Grebe. USS (AM-43), 172, 831 
Greece 

vessels transferred to, 1160, 1163, 1174 
Green Turtle Floating Bed & Breakfast, 840 
Greenling. USS (SS-213), 302 
Green's Shipyard. See Richard T Green Shipyard 
Gregory, Francis H„ 41, 471, 531, 816, 1086 
Grenadier, USS (SS-525) (aka Picua (S-13)), 854, 1115, 1163, 

1165, 1174 
Griffiths, John Willis, 55, 62, 546, 547, 1089 
Grindall. HMS (K 477). See Sanders. USS (DE-273) 
Griswold, DonT, Jr. 141 
Griswold. Margaret N. (Mrs. Don T, Sr). 141 
Griswold. USS (DE-7 / BDE-7), 141, 1108-1109. 1163 
Grosshandler. Horace, 1211 
Grossman, Maryrose, 1129 
Groves, USS (DE-543), 1113, 1163 
GSA. See General Services Administration 
Guadalcanal. Battle of (1942) See under World War II 
Guam, 14 

Guerriere, HMS (frigate), 1079. 1119, 1122, 1161 
Guemere, USS (screw frigate), 1088. 1161. 1163 
Guertin, Joseph, 932 

Guest, USS (DD-472) (aka Para (D-27)), 1109, 1163, 1174 
guided missiles, 150-152, 367 

See also Nike-Ajax (missile); Polaris (missile); Talos (mis- 
sile); Tartar missile system: Terrier (missile); Tomahawk 
(missile) 
Guile, Marcus H., 1109 



Guile, Marjone, 1109 

Gulf of Maine See Maine, Gulf of 

Gulf of Mexico See Mexico, Gulf of 

Gulf of Tonkin Resolution (1964). 1128, 1131 

Gulf Squadron. 1161 

Gundlach. William. 437 

Gurney. Hugh D . 219, 426, 769, 1138, 1144 

Guthrie, Patrick B., 2 

G.W. Bromley & Co.. 280 

Gwm, USS (DD-433) 

in Boston Harbor, 1166 

construction, 134, 983, 1158 

launch, 1107 

in list of ships built by Navy Yard, 1163 

World War II sinking of, 1129, 1166 
Gyatt. USS (DD-712 / DDG-712 / DDG-1), 151-152. 162. 623. 

806, 941, 1125 
Gyatt, USS (DE-550), 1115, 1163 
Gygax. Felix X., 1109, 1115, 1123 



H- 



HABS See Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) 

Hackensack (N.J .). 138n298. 143 

Hadfield, George. 43n128. 422 

HAER See Historic American Engineering Record 

Hague, Wesley McL, 1115-1116 

Haiti 

vessels transferred to, 1164, 1170, 1174 
Hall. USS (DD-583) (aka Lonchi (D-56)), 1109, 1163, 1174 
Halligan. USS (DD-584), 140, 1112, 1163 
HALS See Historic American Landscape Survey (HALS) 
The Halvorson Co., 894 
Hambleton. USS (DD-455), 134, 145 
Hamilton, Allen, 825 
Hamilton, Harold. 1137 
Hamilton. Paul. 19. 428, 1078 
Hammerberg. USS (DE-1015). 809, 831 
Hampton Roads (Va ) See under Port of Embarkation 
Hampton Roads, Battle of (1862) See under Civil War 
Handi-Hut Inc., 838 

Handkerchief Shoal (lightship station), 1l60n3. 1212 
Hannoosh, Alfred A., 1137 
Hapag Lloyd (cruise line), 735 
Haraden. USS (DD-585), 140, 1112, 1163 
Harbor & Land Commissioners, 899 

Harbor Commissioners' line. See under Charlestown Navy Yard 
Harbor Development Associates, 1151 
Harbor Gateway Associates, 1148 
Harbor Gateway Project, 340-341, 345, 1063 
Harbor Place, 872, 1063 
Harbor Seafood (formerly Pilot Seafood), 348 
Harbor Seafood Center See South Boston Annex - Facilities - 

Parcels - M-3 
Harbor Tug No. 779(YT-119) See Geronimo (YT- 1 1 9) 
Harborlights Pavilion See Bank of America Pavilion 
Harborpark, 260, 1054 
Harborpark Day. 253. 437, 998-999 

HarborView. See Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - Other Struc- 
tures & Facilities - HarborView at the Navy Yard 
Harding, Chester, 31 

Harold J. Ellison, USS (DE-545). 1115. 1163 
Harper's New Monthly Magazine. 1 208 
Harpoon Brewery. 343, 354, 723, 1147 

Octoberfest, 723 
Harris, John (landowner), 1003, 1081, 1084-1085. 1189-1190 
Harris, John (Marine Corps Commandant), 429 
Harris, Richard, 1081, 1188 
Harris et at v. Elliott. 1084 
Harrison. Myra. 205 
Hart, William. 418 
Hartford. USS (IX-1 3) 

Civil War service, 48-49, 1121 

commanders (see Farragut, David G., Luce. Stephen B.) 

construction. 1123 

in Dry Dock 1. 763 

launch. 980-981, 1087 

in list of ships built by Navy Yard, 1163 

in Long Island Sound. 49 

sinking, 48 

transfer to private organization for preservation, 175 
Hartt, Edmund, 22, 22n47, 172 
Hartt, Edward, 22 
Hartt's Shipyard, 1077 



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Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1 244 = Volume 3 



1280 



Index 



Harvard University 
Baker Library 

Baldwin Collection (Baldwin Family Papers, 1724-1880). 
1188 
Cambridge Electron Accelerator, 722-723 
professors (seeTreadwell, Daniel) 
as South Boston Annex tenant, 339, 722-723 
Harvey. George W. See George W. Harvey (firm) 
Harwin, Steve, 883 
Haskell, Arthur C, 44 
Hastings, Charles, 557, 994 
Hattie C. Besse. SS. See Genesee, USS 
Havana Harbor (Cuba), 1095 
"Have Your Pass Ready" (Cnte). 1108 
Hawaii, U.S. acquisition of, 12 
Hawkins. USS (DD-873), 903, 933, 1133 
Haxtun. Milton, 1091 

Hayden. Harding & Buchanan. 931-932, 940 
hazardous materials remediation. 

See also Defense Environmental Restoration Program-For- 
merly Used Defense Sites (DERP-FUDS) 
asbestos removal, 672, 709 
Hazelwood. USS (DD-531), 807 
head (toilet), 1206 
Heafitz. Lewis, 437. 439. 534, 537 
Healey, Kerry, 346 
Heath, John A., 264 
heaving down (careening), 33, 761 
Helsingborg (Sweden), 760 
"Hen and Chicks" (photograph), 782 
Henderson, Moses, 1137 
Hennessey, Sean, 1154 

Her Majesty's Royal Marine Band Plymouth, 1152 
"Hercules." See YD-11 (YD-11) 

Hercules, USS. See Quinsigamond. USS (aka Herculesl Oregon) 
Heritage Partners, 2n7 
Herzog, USS (DE-277) (aka Core. HMS). 1163 

See also Gore. HMS (DE-277) 
HeywoodL. Edwards. USS (DD-663) (aka Anake (DD-184)), 140. 

1113. 1163, 1174 
Hickey, J.. 1126 
Hickey. Thomas, 1137 
Highland Marine LP, 698, 1154 
Hill, Catherine, 231 

Himmelfarb. David. 4. 48n148, 521, 1181 
Hines. John Fore, Jr., 1110-1111 
Hines, Mary (Mrs. John Fore, Jr. ), 140, 1110-1111 
Hmgham (Mass.) 

Bare Cove Park, 1100 
Hingham/Cohasset Army Reserve Center, 1100-1101 
Hingham Naval Ammunition Depot (aka Naval Magazine, 
Hmgham), 1100-1101 
administration, 93 
authorization, 1097, 1100 
closure, 1116 
declared surplus, 1128 
establishment, 1098 
Facilities 

Building 15 (Magazine). 1101 
Building 100 (Storehouse), 1101 
Building 114 (Administration Building), 1101 
Naval Magazine, 103 
Quarters A, 1101 
maintenance status, 1116 
safety, 1100 

transfer of materials to. 1083, 1098 
Hingham Naval Industrial Reserve Shipyard (aka Hingham Naval 
Storehouse), 146-147. 149. 698. 1116 
See also Bethlehem Steel Co. - Hingham Shipyard 
Hingham Naval Storehouse See Hingham Naval Industrial Re- 
serve Shipyard 
Hissem, USS (DE-400 / DER-400), 806 

Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), 7, 391, 391n45 393, 
956, 1189 

See also specific facilities under Charlestown Navy Yard - 
Facilities 
Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) 
archival materials, 1189 

Charlestown Navy Yard documentation, 207-212 (sec also 
specific buildings and structures under Charlestown 
Navy Yard - Facilities) 
archival materials, 7, 1189 
funding. 206 
inventory numbers. 396 
recommendations for, 7, 206 
recommendations of, 206 
as Section 106 compliance procedure, 249 
establishment. 383 
guidelines for military/industrial complexes. 384. 391, 391 n45 



Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) — Continued 

mission, 207, 383 
Historic American Landscape Survey (HALS), 391 
Historic Monument Area. See under Charlestown Navy Yard 
Historic Naval Ships Association. 250 
Historic New England (formerly Society for the Preservation of 

New England Antiquities), 258. 1188-1189 
historic resource study, definition of, 1 
Historic Sites Act (1935), 1215 
Historic Venues, Inc., 426. 759 

See also former name Amelia Occasions 
Historical and Urban Environmental Studies Program (HUES), 260 
"History of the Boston Navy Yard" (Preble), 59, 1191 
History of the Boston Navy Yard, 1797 1874 (Preble), 9n1, 30, 

1185 
H.K. Porter (firm), 971 
HL Hunley. CSS (submarine), 50, 1161 
HMFH Architects, 894-895 
HMS Pinafore (operetta), 1151 
HoggattBay, USS (CVE-75), 301 
Holbrook, Cabot & Rollins Corp., 281, 788 
Holland, F. Ross. Jr., 219 
Holland-America Line, 326 
A Home for All (Fowler), 470 
Homeland Security Dept. U.S., 1224 

Hoosac Docks, 24, 898, 1093 (see also Charlestown (Mass) - 
Hoosac Pier) 

Grain Elevator, 24, 255, 898, 1093 
Hoosac Docks Branch (Fitchburg, later Boston & Maine Railroad), 

823, 970, 972, 975 
Hoosac Pier. See under Charlestown (Mass.) 
Hoosac Stores No. 1 & 2. See under Charlestown (Mass.) 
Hopkins, G.M.. 971 
Hoptree, USS (YN 83 / AN-62), 1196 
Hornet (sloop), 22 
horsecars. See streetcars 

Hoste. HMS (DE-521) (aka Mitchell), 1113, 1168, 1168n14, 1174 
hotel ships. See ships and other vessels - barracks ships 
Hough, Henry H„ 498, 1104-1105 
Housatonic. USS (screw sloop), 50, 1087, 1161, 1163 
House Naval Affairs Committee, 58 
House of Representatives, U.S., 29, 1137 

See also Congress, U.S.; House Naval Affairs Committee; 
Senate, U.S. 

Members (see Donnelly, Brian; Fitzgerald. John F.; Kennedy. 
John F.; McCormack, John W.; Moakley, John Joseph; 
Myers, John T.; O'Neill, Thomas P., Jr.) 
Housing & Urban Development Dept.. U.S., 1139 
Houston (Tex.) 

NASA Manned Spacecraft Center, 723 
Howard, William E„ Jr., 303. 307, 932, 1125 
Howard F. Clark. USS (DE-533), 1113, 1163 
Howard W Gllmore. USS (AS-16), 148 
Howison, Henry L , 1095 
Hubbard, Anna S.. 1103 
Hubbell. Ardie May, 143 

Hudson, USS (DD-475), 1087, 1109, 1163, 1176, 1184 
Hudson, William L, 1087, 1189 
Hudson River, 760 
Hufnagle, Nora B., 501 
Hugh Purvis. USS (DD-709), 150, 807 
Hughes-Foulkrod Co., 696 
Hull, Ann (Mrs. Isaac), 810, 1079, 1089 
Hull. Isaac. 1079 

Building 4 ownership. 442 

career overview, 1119 

as Charlestown Navy Yard Commandant 
appointment, 1079 

Boundary Wall recommendations, 740 
detachment, 1079 
Dry Dock 1 inauguration, 34 
Main Gate Guard House, 416 
Marine Hospital, 18 
Porter's Quarters, 416 
reappointment. 1079 
relief as Navy Yard Commandant, 1080 

as Commander of Constitution. USS. 1119 

as New York Navy Yard Commander, 1119 

as Norfolk Navy Yard Commander. 1119 

portrait, 1079, 1119 

as Portsmouth Navy Yard Commander, 22. 22n48, 1079. 1119 

sale of land to Charlestown Navy Yard, 1079 

as Washington Navy Yard Commander, 1119 
Hull-c\ass destroyers, 151 
Hull Lifesaving Museum 

BMIP facilities, 261, 354, 721 

boathouse. 262. 911, 1154 

educational programs, 260-261, 911 



Hull Lifesaving Museum — Continued 

office and classroom space, 225. 457 

rowing and boatbuilding program. 225. 261, 457, 721, 911. 
1154 
hull numbers. See under ships and other vessels 
Humboldt, USS (AVP-21 / AG-121), 139, 1107, 1163 
Hunt. Phil, 246 

Hi mi. i s Point Naval Dry Dock. See San Francisco Naval Ship- 
yard 
Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard. See San Francisco Naval Ship- 
yard 
Hurricane Carol (1954), 310, 693, 695, 796. 1012-1013, 1124 
Hurricane Diane (1955). 472. 1037 
Husband, Alexander C, 932 
Hutchins. USS (DD-476). 1109, 1163 
Huygens & DiMella, 606, 624 
Hyde Windlass. 764. 776. 778-779. 787, 1097 
Hynes, John B.. 667 



I- 



ICA. See Boston (Mass.) - Institute of Contemporary Art 

ICCNE LLC, 703,872, 1155 

Idaho. USS(BB-42). 14 

III, Mrs. Charles L. (Florence), 1201 

Illinois. USS (BB-7). 973 

Immobiliare-Congress Group, 245 

Immobiliare/Congress Ventures, 552 

Immobiliare New England 

acquisition by Raymond, 238, 616-617, 868 
BRA, agreements with 

Land Disposition Agreement (1977), 237, 868, 1144. 1148 
Parcel 4A-1 (Building 104) - Flagship Wharf agreement. 
242. 849 
joint ventures (see Building 103 Associates; Immobiliare- 
Congress Group; Immobiliare/Congress Ventures) 
New Development Area 
development projects 

Building 42 (Constitution Quarters), 514, 1144 

Building 105, 1146 

Building 127 demolition, 1144 

Building 196 demolition, 1144 

Building 197 (Independence Quarters / Flagship 

Wharf). 242, 616, 849 
McKinleyAve., 1028 
Parcels 1B-1, 2B-1, 3B-1, 3C-1 (Shipyard Quarters 

Marina). 241, 634, 839-840, 929, 1146 
Parcel 3B / Pier 7 (Constellation Wharf condomini 

urns), 260, 260n746. 868, 932-933, 1147 
Parcels 3B-1, 3C, 3C-1, 2C, 3J / Pier 8 (Shipyard 

Quarters Marina, Phase II), 937, 1146-1147 
Parcels 3E, 3F (Shipways Condominium), 985, 1146 
Parcel 3G I Shipways 2 (Shipways Garage), 1146- 

1147 
Parcel 3H / Shipways 2 (Shipways Condominium, 

Phase II), 988-989, 1146-1147 
Parcel 3K / Shipways 2 (Shipways Garage), 841. 

1146-1147 
Parcel 4A, 849 
Parcel 4A-1, 849, 1147 
Parcel 4B, 856 
Pier 5, 925 

Shipways 1 (Shipways Garage), 841, 1146-1147 
development rights, 237, 856, 862, 868, 1139 

acquired by LDAAcquisition, 238, 247, 844, 862. 868. 

925 
acquired by LDA Pier 9, 856 

Parcel 4A-1 (Building 104) - Flagship Wharf agree- 
ment, 242, 849 
financing BRA's purchase of, 237. 277. 1144 
parent firm, 237 

bankruptcy. 238. 247. 844 
Shipyard Marina Trust, control of, 929 
Imperial Beach Naval Air Station, 1137 
Inca, USS (yacht), 63 
Incubator Associates, 491, 1145-1146 
Independence. USS (ship-ofthe-line) 
Algiers, war on, 22 
construction. 16, 22, 1079, 1120 
conversion to frigate, 762, 1084, 1163n10 
launch, 22, 1079 

in list of ships built by Navy Yard, 1163 
as Receiving Ship, 49, 55. 1080 
Independence Quarters. See Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

- Numbered Buildings & Structures - 197 
Indonesia 

vessels transferred to. 1169. 1174 
Industrial Brownhoist, 103. 833 

The Influence of Sea Power Upon History. 1660-1783 (Mahan), 
420 



Pages 1 -394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395- 1 076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



1281 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



The Influence of Sea Power Upon the French Revolution and 

Empire. 1793-1812 (Mahan). 420 
Inglis, HMS (DE-525), 1113, 1168, 1174 
Ingraham, USS (DD-444), 1129 
Inman, HMS (DE-526), 1113, 1168, 1174 
Inner Space Services, 910 

Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA). See under Boston (Mass.) 
Interior Appropriations Acts 

FY 2013 (projected), 672 
Interior Dept., U.S., 218, 551n1, 1137 

Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA), 771 
International Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners Local 33, 870- 

871 
International Cargo Center of New England, 869-872 

See also South Boston Annex - Facilities - Parcels - D 

buildings replaced by, 355, 870 

construction, 341, 872, 893, 1074 

creation, 341 

lease agreement, 341, 1155 

location, 355, 1063, 1074 

opening, 703 

parcels occupied by, 869-870 

Phase I, 869, 1156 

Phase II (proposed), 353, 703 

principals, 341, 341n279, 872 

street view, 355, 1063, 1074 
International Cargo Development LLC, 1154 
International Cargo Port. See Boston Army Base - Facilities - 

Numbered Buildings & Structures — 8 [118] 
Intrepid, USS (steam torpedo ram), 55, 896, 1089, 1162-1163 
Iowa, USS (BB-61), 790 

Iowa, USS (steam frigate). See Ammonoosuc, USS (steam frig- 
ate) 
Ironsides Place. See Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities - Num- 
bered Buildings & Structures - 36 
Ironworkers Union, 728 
Iroquois, HMCS (DDH-280), 274 
Irwin, Samuel, 1213 
Island End River, 1082 
Ismay Imrie & Co., 782 
Italy 

naval vessels, 908 

vessels transferred to, 1164, 1170, 1174 

World War II, 1108 
Ivas, Paul, 153, 1179 
Iwo Jima (Japan), 1114 

IX-311. See Benewah, USS (APB-35 / APL-35 / IX-311) 
IX-502. See Mercer, USS (APB-39 / IX-502 / APL-39) 
IX-503. See Nueces, USS (APL-40 / APB-40 / IX-503) 
IX-504. See Echols, USS (APB-37 / IX-504) 
IXSS-297. See Ling, USS (SS-297 / AGSS-297 / IXSS-297) 

-J- 

Jackson, Andrew, 34, 178, 517, 761, 1084, 1122 

Jakob Van Heemskerk, HNLMS (F-812), 257 

James, Reuben, 479 

James Hook & Co., 707 

James O. McFarland Inc., 552 

Japan 

expansionist threats (1930s), 12, 109, 120, 577 

Marine Corps service in, 675 

Maritime Self-Defense Force, 140 

merchant marine, 426 

Perry expedition, 1085 

Shinto shrines, 675 

vessels transferred to, 140, 1163, 1170, 1174 

World War II 

Guadalcanal. Battle of (1942), 140 

Gwin. USS, attack on, 1166 

Okinawa kamikaze attacks, 146, 251 

Pearl Harbor, Attack on (1941), 82, 85, 140. 251, 927, 

1108 
Pecos, USS, sinking of, 1103 
surrender, 12 

U.S. declaration of war on, 1108 
Wakefield, USS, bombing of, 296 
Jarvis, John Wesley, 1079 
Jarvis Engineering Co., 596, 858, 866 
Java, HMS, 22, 1118 
Java. USS (frigate), 55 
Jefferson, Thomas, 9, 16, 178 
Jenkins, Nneka, 1153 
Jesse L. Brown, USS (DE-1089). 21 
Jewel of the Seas, MV, 794 
J.F. FioreCo., 719 

J.F. Fitzgerald Construction Co., 722, 804-805, 921, 935. 1108 
J.F. White Co.. 932 



"Jiggs" OToole (dog), 675 

Jimmy's Harborside Restaurant. See under South Boston (Mass.) 

J J Daly Co., 352, 701 

J.M. Crowley (firm), 467, 490, 1098, 1202 

John Adams (frigate), 22 

John F. Fitzgerald Expressway. See Central Artery 

John F. Kennedy, USS (CVA-67 / CV-67), 357-358. 734. 875, 877, 

1066 
John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum 

at Charlestown Navy Yard (proposed), 233-234, 259, 1138 
Josiah Johnson Hawes Photographs (1863-1897). 1189 
John Forward Inc., 864-865 

John Hancock. USS (steam tug), 830n1, 1086, 1163, 1163n11 
John J Daly Co., 339-340, 724-725, 1145 
John J O'Hagan, SS. See Aries, USS (AK-51) 
John J Powers, USS (DE-528), 1113, 1163, 1166 
John King, USS (DDG-3), 919. 1184 
John M. Bermmgham, USS (DE-530), 1113, 1163 
John Nagle Co., 343, 354, 723, 1146, 1156 
John Paul Jones House. See Charlestown Navy Yard - Facilities 

- Numbered Buildings & Structures - 120 
John Paul Jones LP, 593, 1146 
John Prescott (schooner), 764 
Johnson, Andrew, 109, 1089 
Johnson, Anthony R., 675 
Johnson, Jay L, 177, 1150 
Johnson, Lyndon B., 13, 180, 1128. 1134 
Johnson, Mortimer L., 1096 
Johnson, Philip D., 485, 1108 
Joinery Shop Associates, 587-588, 1147, 1156 
Joint Task Force Seven, 426 
Jon Roll & Associates, 339 
Jonas Ingram (DD-938), 578, 855 
Jones, Frank C, 180, 305, 500, 668, 1125, 1128 
Jones, Leslie, 1187 
Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co.. 83 
Jones, Stuart C, 218, 437, 444, 1125, 1134 
Jones, William, 896 
Jones & Meehan, 590, 1097 
Jordan Gruzen Partnership, 616 
Jorrin, Victor A., 426 
Joseph, Chapin, 1137 
Joseph E. Bennett Co., 619 

Joseph J. Luna. MV (aka Bulwark, USS), 887-888, 888n1 
Joseph P. Kennedy. Jr., USS (DD-850), 337, 800 
JRC Ventures, 593, 1150 
Junior League of Boston 

Decorator's Show House, 225, 254, 427, 457, 1150, 1154 



-K- 



"K" Street Annex. See under South Boston Annex 

Kadashan Bay, USS (CVU-76), 979 

Kaes, T, 1126 

Kaes, William J., 521 

Kahn, Albert, 85n219, 364. 602 

Kaiser Engineers. 158, 171, 313, 1131, 1134 

Kalamazoo (Mich), 1200 

Kalamazoo, USS (AOR-6), 1200-1201 

Kalinin Bay, USS (CVE-68), 301 

Kaloupek, William E., 811-812 

Kaltenbach (firm), 124, 212, 955-956, 966-967. 1107, 1109 

Kaplan, Ruth A., 502 

Kasaan Bay, USS (CVHE-69), 302 

Katahdin, USS (armored ram), 1092, 1187 

KatyD. (trawler) (aka YP-409. USS), 144 

Kavanagh Advisory Group, 1157 

Keane, John F., 119 

Kearns, John, 1213 

Kearny. USS (DD-432), 135-136 

Kearsarge, USS (BB-5 / IX-16 / AB-1), 311, 719, 1203, 1219 

See also Crane Ship No. 1 (AB-1 ) 
Keats, HMS (K.482) (aka 7Vsda/e, USS (DE-278)), 141. 1112.1171. 

1174 
keel blocks, 1222 

Keen Development Corp., 587-588 
Kell, Elizabeth Jean. 119 
Kelly, Paul, 218 
Kempthorne, HMS (K.483) (aka Trumpeter, USS (DE-279)), 120, 

1112, 1171, 1171n18, 1174 
Kendall Development Group, 527, 1146 
Kennedy, Edward M. "Ted," 461, 919, 1137, 1151 
Kennedy, John F.. 13, 318-319, 626, 927, 1151 
Kennedy, Thomas "Fid," 337. 1066 
Kenneth D. Bailey. USS (DDR-713), 924 



Kenneth D Bailey. USS (DE-552). 1115, 1163 

Kenney, Robert T., 238, 245, 248, 481 

Kenney Development, 238, 247, 483. 504-505, 1154 

Aeo/<uMYTB-771), 957 

Ker-Mac Drilling Barge No. 1, 143 

See also YFN-893 (YF-893) 
Kerr-McGee Oil Industries, 143 
Key West Naval Base and Naval Station, 1137 
Keywadin. USS (screw frigate). See Pennsylvania. USS 
Kilkee LP, 1149 
Kimberly, Lewis A., 1089-1091 
King, Edward J.. 306 
King. James W, 419 
King George's War, 258-259 
"Kingfisher" (aircraft), 1197 
Kings Bay (Ga), 15, 367n20 

Kingsmill. HMS (DE-280), 1112, 1168. 1168n14, 1174 
Kinnier, Richard R., 213 

Kittery Navy Yard. See Portsmouth Naval Shipyard 
Kleihues, Josef Paul, 754-755. 837 
Kleihues + Kleihues, 754-755, 837 
Kleppe, Thomas S., 206 
Kneeland, Ralph P., 1126. 1213 
Knight. USS (DD-633 / DMS-40), 1108. 1164, 1166 
Knox, Frank. 109, 251, 798, 946, 948 
Knox, Robert, 1191 
Knox-c\ass frigates, 801 
Koehring Co.. 1203 

Kolombangara (Solomon Islands), 1166 
Korea 

"discovery" of, 1123 

off-shore council of war (1871). 1089 
Korea, Democratic Peoples Republic of (North Korea) 

invasion of South Korea, 1116 
Korea, Republic of (South Korea) 

Ambassador, 836 

invasion by North Korea, 1116 
Korean War 

archival materials, 1185 

Armistice, 998, 1124 

commemoration, 239, 250, 836, 998 

Dry Dock 4 use, 800 

Medal of Honor recipients, 1197 

memorial (see Massachusetts Korean War Veterans Memo- 
rial) 

Naval expansion, 251 

onset, 1116 

in periods of significance, 3, 368 

reactivation and modernization of ships, 13, 150, 251, 301- 
302, 1204 
Krim, Joanne, 501 
Knm, William, 501 
Kronpnnzessin Cecilie. See Mount Vernon. USS (Id. No 1466) 



L-4. USS (SS-43), 765 
L-8. USS (SS-48), 595 
£-77, USS (SS-51), 921 
Lafayette, Marquis de, 1080 
Lafayette-c\ass ballistic missile submarines. 809 
Lake Champlain. USS (CVS-39), 964 
Lake Erie. See Erie, Lake 
Lake Erie, Battle of. See under Wat of 1812 
Lake Geneva, USS (Id. No. 421 5-B). See Aries, USS (AK-51) 
Lake Ontario. See Ontario, Lake 

Lancetfish, USS (SS-296), 138, 936, 1115, 1164, I164n12. 1176 
landing craft, medium (LCM) See under ships and other vessels 
Langone, Helen A., 501 

Lansdale. USS (DD-426), 108, 1107, 1164, 1166 
Latimer. Julian L., 1100 
Law, Don, 346, 889 

Lawford. HMS (DE-516). 1112, 1168, 1174 
Lawler, William J., 1095 

Lawrence E. Martin Laboratories. See Massachusetts Biomedi- 
cal Research Corp 
Lawson. HMS (DE-518), 1168, 1174 
LDA Acquisition 

HarborView Point, 844 

New Development Area development rights 

transferred from Immobiliare. 238, 247, 844, 862. 868. 

925 
transferred to Partners HealthCare System (Parcels 6 
and 7), 1155 

principals, 238 

Residences at Pier 5, 247, 925 

Yard's End Research Center (proposed), 862, 868 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1 244 = Volume 3 



1282 



Index 



LDA Pier 5 Associates LLC, 1155 

LDAPier 9, 856, 1155 

Le Fantasque (French destroyer), 949 

Leach, CM. See CM. Leach (firm) 

Leachmore Point LLC, 725, 1156 

League Island Navy Yard. See Philadelphia Naval Shipyard 

Leahy, Albert M., 550 

archival materials, 1179 

chain innovations. 107, 485, 550, 1105. 1121 

in Master Mechanics & Foreman's Association, 1126 

portrait, 550 

as shop master, 1213 
Lee, James, 46 
Lee, Robert E.. 1088 

Legal Sea Foods, 348-349, 357, 878, 880-881, 882, 1154 
Legion of Merit recipients, 1123 
Lehman, John F , Jr., 324 
Lend-Lease Act (1941), 134, 1107, 1165, 1196 
Leonard Silver Manufacturing Co.. 703 
Leonhardt, Richard, 1191 
Lester, Eben A., 761 
iesier, USS (DE-1022), 636 

Lets TakeA 7bp (CBS-TV children's program). 1125, 1176 
Leverone, Robert M„ 426 
Leviathan, HMS, 1174 

Leviathan, SS (passenger ship) (aka Vaterland), 282, 789, 1105 
Lewis, USS (DE-535), 1113. 1164 
Lexington, USS (CV-2), 283 
Leyte (Philippines). 1114 
Leyte, USS (AVT-10 / CVS-32), 301, 874, 1124 
Libertad, ARA(Q-2). 904, 1152 
Liberty, Harold F„ 218. 866-867 
Liberty Bonds. 991 
Library of Congress 

as HABS repository, 1189, 1206 

HAER 

establishment of, 383 

repository for, 7, 384, 393, 396, 1206 

Manuscript Division 

Papers of Daniel Dodge Brodhead (1821-1853), 1179, 

»1189 
Papers of John Shaw (1798-1895), 1189 
Papers of Morton L. Deyo (1911-1981), 1189 
Papers of William Leverreth Hudson (1821-1889), 1189 
Records of the Charlestown Navy Yard (1801 -1805), 1189 
Prints & Photographs Division 
Boston Naval Shipyard, 1189 
Detroit Publishing Company Collection, 1189 
Historic American Buildings Survey, 1189 
Historic American Engineering Record, 1189 
Light Vessel No. 4 (aka Brilliant], 1087, 1160, 1160n3, 1212 
Lighthouse Board, U.S., 1087, 1160, 1160n3, 1212 
Lighthouse Service, U S„ 550, 1105, 1212, 1224 
lightships. See under ships and other vessels 
Lincoln, Abraham, 50, 1000, 1026, 1087 
Linde Air Products Co ., 193, 867 
Lindsay, HMS (DE-519). See Pasley, HMS (DE-519) 
Ling, USS (SS-297 /AGSS-297 / IXSS-297), 138, 138n298. 143, 

1164, 1164n12 
Lionfish, USS (SS-298), 138n298, 337, 794, 1164n12 
botta, Charles, 655 
Little Mystic Channel 

Chelsea St bridge, 28, 582, 585, 589, 742, 747-748 
Chelsea-Water Streets connector project bridge, 748-749 
location, 52, 749 
manna, 587 

Pier 11 redevelopment restrictions, 945 
Little Rock, USS (CLG-4), 1210 
Livermore. USS (DD-429). 149 
L.L Leach & Sons 

Building 103 contract, 539. 1098 
Building 104 contract, 542, 548, 554, 1096 
Building 105 contract, 1097 
Building 106 contract. 542, 548, 554, 1096 
Building 107 contract. 557, 562, 1096 
Building 108 contract, 557, 562, 1096 
LNRC Venture. 1146 
Locatelli, J.E., 526, 1099 
Lockwood's Basin, 92-93 

as Charlestown Navy Yard annex, 93. 278, 1104 
as Coast Guard Section Base 6, 92-93 
declared surplus, 93, 1116 
disposal of, 93, 146 
Facilities 

Building 1 (General Headquarters), 92 

(Building 2, 92 
Building 8 (Carpenters Shop), 92 
Marine Railway. 92-93 
Pier D. 92 



Lockwood's Basin — Continued 

Naval Frontier Base, 124 

Naval Local Defense Force, 123 

Navy acquisition of, 92-93, 1102 

World War I, 93 

World War II, 92-93, 124 
Lodge (engraver), 1077 
Logan, Burt, 1150 

Logan Airport See under East Boston (Mass.) 
Lonchi (D-56). See Hall, USS (DD-583) 
London Naval Treaty, 1930, 12, 1105, 1203 
Long, John D , 70 

Long Beach. USS (CGN-9), 153, 793 

Long Beach Naval Shipyard (aka Terminal Island Naval Dry Dock; 
Terminal Island Naval Shipyard) 

aerial view, 371 

Building 132 (Machine Shop), 288, 696 

closure (disestablishment), 15, 1137, 1150 

as core navy yard, 13. 1 80 

dry docks, 12-14, 1108 

Drydocker. 502 

establishment, 1112 

inactivation. 13, 1116 

on map of naval shipyards, 11, 14 

reactivation, 13n17, 1116 

World War II, 9 
Long Island Sound, 49 
Longshoreman's Union, 1066 
Lormg, HMS (DE-520), 1113, 1168, 1174 
Louis, HMS (DE-517), 1112, 1168, 1174 
Lovenng. USS (DE-272) (aka Gould, HMS), 1112, 1164, 1174 
Lowell National Historical Park, 226, 468 
LST-301, USS (LST-301 /ATL-301), 142, 1109, 1169, 1174 
-302), 142, 1109, 1169, 1174 
-303), 142, 1109, 1169, 1174 
-304), 142, 1109, 1169, 1174 
-305), 142, 1109, 1167, 1169, 1174 
-306) (aka Bernalillo County, USS), 



LST-302. USS (LST-302 /ATL 
LST-303, USS (LST-303/ATL 
LST-304, USS (LST-304 / ATL 
LST-305, USS (LST-305 /ATL 
LST-306. USS (LST-306/ATL 

1109, 1169 
LST-307, USS (LST-307 / ATL 
LST-308, USS (LST-308 / ATL 
LST-309, USS (LST-309 / ATL 
LST-310, USS (LST-310/ATL 



-307), 1109, 1169 
-308), 1109, 1169 
-309). 1109, 1169 
-310) (aka Aeolus, USS (ARL-42)), 

133, 1109, 1114, 1159, 1169 
LST-980, USS (LST-980) (aka Meeker County, USS), 1113, 1169 
LST-981. USS (LST-981). 1113, 1169 
LST-982, USS (LST-982), 1113, 1169 
LST-983. USS (LST-983) (aka Middlesex County, USS / Teluk 

Tomani), 1113, 1169, 1174 
LST-984. USS (LST-984), 1113, 1169 
LST-985, USS (LST-985), 1113, 1167, 1169 
LST-986. USS (LST-986), 1113, 1169 
LST-987, USS (LST-987) (aka Millard County, USS), 1113, 1169, 

1174 
LST-988. USS (LST-988) (aka Mineral County, USS), 1113, 1169 
LST-989, USS (LST-989), 1113, 1169 
LST-990, USS (LST-990), 1113-1114, 1169 
LST-991. USS (LST-991), 1113, 1169 
LST-992, USS (LST-992), 1113, 1169 
LST-993, USS (LST-993) (aka Chung Hsun(lST-208)). 1113, 1169, 

1174 
LST-994. USS (LST-994), 1113, 1169 
LST-995. USS (LST-995), 1113, 1169 
LST-996, USS (LST-996), 1113, 1169 
LST-997, USS (LST-997), 1113, 1169 
LST-998. USS (LST-998), 1113, 1169 
LST-999, USS (LST-999), 1113, 1169 
LST-1000. USS (LST-1000), 1113, 1169 
LST- 1001, USS (LST-1001), 1113, 1169 
LST-1002, USS (LST-1002), 1113, 1169 
LST-1003. USS (LST-1003 / ARL-10) (aka Coronis. USS), 1113, 

1169 
LST-1028, USS (LST-1028), 1115, 1169 
LST-1029. USS(LST-1029). 1115. 1169 
LST-1030, USS (LST-1030) (aka Chung Chuan (LST-221)), 1115, 

1170. 1174 
LST-1031. USS (LST-1031). 1115. 1170 
LSI '1032. USS (LST-1032) (aka Monmouth County. USS). 1114- 

1115, 1170 
LST 1033. USS(LST-1O33/LST(H)-1O33)(akaC/?un9Sften0(LST- 

211)), 142, 1114-1115, 1170, 1174 
LST-1034. USS (LST-1034). 142, 1115. 1170 
LST-1035. USS (LST-1035). 1115. 1170 

LST-1036. USS (LST-1036 /ARL-11) (aka Creon. USS). 1115. 1170 
LST- 1037. USS (LST-1037). See Poseidon. USS (ARL-12 / LST- 

1037) 



LST-1153. USS (LST-1153) (aka Talbot County. USS). 146, 805- 

806, 1170 
LST-1154, USS (LST-1154 / AVB-2) (aka Tallahatchie County, 

USS), 146, 148, 983, 1115, 1170 
LST-1155. USS (LST-1155), 1115, 1170 
LST-1171. USS(LST-1171), 1181 
LST-1174. USS (LST-1174), 1181 

LST(H)-1033. SeeLST-1033. USS (LST-1033 / LST(H)-1033) 
LT-1966. USAV (aka Cn/copee (YTM-747)), 578 
LT-1970. USAV, 250 

LTG William B Bunker. USAV (LSV-4), 257 
Luce, Stephen B., 178, 435 
Lunnin, Josephy W., 546 

Lutts, Carleton G "Doc," 4, 107. 485, 550, 1105, 1108, 1121 
Lyman, W., 761 

Lynde Air Products Co. See Linde Air Products Co. 
Lynx, USS (SP-2), 83, 909 
Lynx II, USS (SP-730), 92 
Lyons, Kenneth T,, 1115 



M 



MacDonald, Gertrude C, 1181 

Macdonough, USS (DD-351), 107-108, 1105-1106, 1164 

Macey, Arthur, 991 

Macey, Arthur F.. Jr.. 991 

Macon, USS (CA-132). 162 

Madison. USS (DD-425), 108, 1107, 1164, 1166 

magnetic mines, 939 

Magnolia Drilling Barge No 1 Sec YF-891 (YF-891) 

Mahan, Alfred Thayer, 4n10, 420 

Main Interior Building. See under Washington (DC.) 

Maine, Gulf of, 280 

Maine. USS (battleship), 1095 

Maine Central Railroad, 1019 

Maine Electric Co.. 797 

Majestic. RMS (passenger ship), 283, 1105 

Malchman, Herbert M.. 502 

Maiden (Mass.) 

Nitre Depot, 93. 1088-1089 
Maloney. Mark, 346 
Man, Amir, 606 

Manhattan. SS (passenger liner). See Wakefield, USS (AP-21) 
Manila Bay, Battle of (1898) See under Spanish-American War 
Manila Bay, USS (CVU-61). 302 

Manitou. USS (screw sloop) (aka Worcester. USS). 1089, 1164 
Manned Spacecraft Center, See under National Aeronautics & 

Space Administration (NASA) 
Manners. HMS (DE-523), 1113, 1168, 1174 
Manning, Frank V, 1126 
Mansfield, George OQ, 1130 
Mania. USS (SS-299). 138n298, 1164n12 
Maratanza. USS (sidewheel gunboat) (aka Salnave). 1087, 1164, 

1174 
Marblehead (Mass). 177, 911 
Marcus Island. USS (CVHE-77), 302 
Mare Island Naval Shipyard (aka Mare Island Navy Yard) 

closure (disestablishment), 15, 1150 

Commandant (see Howison, Henry L ; Rodgers, John) 

establishment, 11, 1086 

Facilities 

Building 110 (Pump House). 595 
Building M37 (Marine Barracks), 365 
Dry Dock 1, 70. 595. 1095. 1107 
Dry Dock 2, 70, 595, 1095, 1107 

HABS/HAER documentation, 391n45 

images of 

19th century, 10 
aerial view, 371 
color photography, ixnl 

Independence. USS (receiving ship), 22, 49 

on map of naval shipyards, 11,14 

merger with San Francisco Naval Shipyard, 180. 1131 

Monadnock. USS. 50 

on National Register, 363 

Navy file code. 1215 

rigging production, 63 

World War II, ixnl, 9 
Mare Island Navy Yard See Mare Island Naval Shipyard 
Mane, Audrey R , 2 
Marine Barracks. Boston. See Marine Corps, U.S. - Barracks. 

Boston 
Marine Corps, U.S. 

archival materials, 1186, 1189 

Barnes Building recruiting office. 324 

Barracks, definition of, 428n1 

Barracks, Boston. 430, 1215 



Pages 1-394 = Volume 1 



Pages 395-1076 = Volume 2 



Pages 1077-1244 = Volume 3 



- 1283 



Charlestown Navy Yard Historic Resource Study 



Barracks, Charlestown (see Charlestown Navy Yard - Facili- 
ties - Other Structures & Facilities - Marine Barracks 
(Building I)) 
Barracks, Washington (DC), 428n1 
barracks architecture, 365 

in Charlestown Navy Yard, 18-21 (see a/so Charlestown Navy 
Yard - Facilities - Other Structures & Facilities - Ma- 
rine Barracks (Building I); Charlestown Navy Yard - 
Facilities - Other Structures & Facilities - Marine Bar- 
racks Parade Ground) 

Colors (flag raising and lowering), 479, 648-649 
commissioning ceremonies, 686 
Constitution, USS, Bicentennial Salute, 1152 
detachment assigned to, 1078 
duties, 20-21 

Purple Heart ceremony, 20 
sentries, 26, 60. 423, 811, 816 
Commandants (see Harris, John; McCawley, Charles G,; 

Wharton, Franklin) 
Commandant's House, Washington, DC 422 
Headquarters, 431 
History Division, 1189 
rank designations, 1194 
service in Okinawa and Japan, 675 
Marine Hospital 

Brighton (Mass.), 18n32, 1082 
Charlestown (Mass.), 18, 30, 43, 1078, 1080 
Chelsea (Mass.), 18n32. 1082 
marine railways. See also underCharleston Naval Shipyard (S.C.); 
Charlestown Navy Yard; Chelsea Annex; Lockwood's Ba- 
sin; Washington Navy Yard 
appropriations for, 830, 1102 
constructors, 93, 830 
definition of, 93, 830, 1213 
Marinette Marine, 1219 
"Marion." See ra-7J(YD-13) 
Marion, USS (sloop-of-war), 1084, 1122, 1164 
Marion Steam Shovel Co., 212, 955, 965, 1109 
Maritime Administration, U.S., 318, 771, 947, 1224 
Maritime Commission, U.S., 12, 318, 1205 
Marlboro, USS (APB-38 /APL-38), 139, 1109, 1115, 1164 
Marlyn Utilities, 707, 1139 
Marron, Adrian R„ 1112, 1115, 1123 
Marshfield, USNS (T-AK-282), 794 
Martha's Vineyard (Mass.), 771 
Marthas Vineyard, SS, 771, 945, 1148 
Martin, William A.K., 479 

Mary O'Malley Park. See under Chelsea (Mass) 
Maryland, USS (CA-8) (aka Frederick, USS/ 69-70, 780-781, 

1098, 1119, 1188-1189 
Mason. USS (DE-529), 141, 936, 1113, 1164 
Mass. Bay Brewing Co., 343, 723, 1156 
Massachusetts 

Governor (see also Butler, Benjamin Franklin; Dukakis, 
Michael S.; Sargent, Francis W, "Frank") 
Boston-area highway projects and, 218, 1041 
Constitution, USS, drydocking salute, 34 
jurisdiction of former Navy properties, 1139 
Governor (acting) (see Healey, Kerry) 
Massachusetts (passenger steamer), 82 
Massachusetts, USRC, 477 
Massachusetts. USS (BB-2), 576 
Massachusetts, USS (BB-59), 337, 794, 796 
Massachusetts Air National Guard, 318 
Massachusetts Bay, 177. 1150 
Massachusetts Bay Colony, 477 

Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA). See also 
Boston Elevated Railway Co.; Metropolitan Transit Authority 
(MTA) 
boxcars, 227 

bus service, 223, 676, 837, 1150, 1155 
rapid transit system, 698 
Silver Line route (see Silver Line South Boston Waterfront 

Transitway project) 
water shuttles, 222, 838, 1155 
Massachusetts Biomedical Research Corp. 
Building 75 

lease transfer, 530, 1155 
Building 114 

lease transfer, 588, 1151 
Building 149 

lease transfer, 607, 624, 1150 
rehabilitation of, 1147 
relocation to, 243 
Building 199 

lease transfer, 624, 1150 
Massachusetts Bureau of Marine Fisheries, 93 
Massachusetts College of Art, 236, 606, 1139 
Massachusetts Commissioner of Public Works, 626 



Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (formerly 
Department of Environmental Quality Engineering) 
Bank of America Pavilion license, 345-346, 889. 1151 
BMIP Central Parking Structure approval, 1154 
BRA Waterfront Activation Plan approval, 1156 
Chapter 91 license review and approval (see Chapter 91, 

Mass. General Laws) 
lawsuit against Immobiliare, 260, 932-933 
Pier 2 environmental concerns, 910 
Pier 10 reconstruction approval, 1147 
Small Boat Docking Facility permit, 907 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Quality Engineer- 
ing. See Massachusetts Department of Environmental Pro- 
tection 
Massachusetts Department of Public Works 

CA/T project, 351 (see also Central Artery/Tunnel (CA/T) 

project) 
Chelsea-Water Streets Connector project, 21 5, 21 7, 225, 230 

(see also Chelsea-Water Streets Connector) 
Gate 4/5th St. project, 221, 230 
South Boston Annex expansion, approval of, 285 
South Boston Annex pier condition warning, 332 
Massachusetts Environmental Police, 225, 916, 1144 
Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, 1139 
Massachusetts Executive Office of Transportation, 1156 
Massachusetts General Court 

Navy Yard Collimation Tower (Structure 110), approval for, 874 
Navy Yard expansion, approval for, 1095, 1104, 1116, 1157 
Navy Yard land purchase, approval for, 1077 
Navy Yard pier extension, approval for, 927-928 
Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). See also Partners 
Healthcare 
archival materials, 1192 
Building 120 lease, 593 
Building 149 research laboratories, 236, 607, 624, 1147 (see 

also Massachusetts Biomedical Research Corp.) 
Children's Center, 437 

Institute of Health Professions, 243, 491, 1151 
Massachusetts Biomedical Research Corp. (see Massachu- 
setts Biomedical Research Corp.) 
shuttle service, 223 
Massachusetts General Hospital-East. See Massachusetts Bio- 
medical Research Corp. 
Massachusetts Highway Department. See also specific project 
by name 

BNHP parking lot construction, 223 
Central Artery/Tunnel project, 347-348, 351, 728, 877-878, 

1149 
Chelsea-Water Streets Connector project, 223, 441, 1051 
Commandant's House Driveway repaving, 1051 
Intermodal Surface Tr